first_img MyanmarAsia – Pacific News RSF_en May 31, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts News US journalist held in Yangon prison notorious for torture Help by sharing this information MyanmarAsia – Pacific May 12, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Myanmarcenter_img March 19, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Regime bans magazine articles by historian RSF asks Germany to let Myanmar journalist Mratt Kyaw Thu apply for asylum Thai premier, UN rapporteurs asked to prevent journalists being returned to Myanmar News to go further May 26, 2021 Find out more News 03.20.2003The Censorship Office banned publication in early March of articles by Burmese historian Than Tun. The move is thought to be linked with his remarks on the US-based Radio Free Asia about the recent discovery of three white elephants in western Burma. The military regime said they were a very good sign of the country’s future prosperity, but Than Tun said there was no connection between them and national development. Burma is in deep economic crisis.The magazine Irrawaddy, published in Thailand, said the move could be due to articles by the historian in the monthly Klaya about how Burma was governed in the 18th century. Censors may have spotted references to how the country was currently being run by the army, it said.————————————-Military junta bans reporting on banking crisis03.18.2003A month-old news blackout imposed by the military junta on a crisis in Burma’s banking system is flagrant violation of the right of the Burmese people to be freely informed, Reporters Without Borders (Reporters sans frontières) and the Burma Media Association (BMA) said today. Newspaper editors have been threatened with reprisals if they violate the ban.”The Burmese government, one of the few in the world to impose prior censorship on privately-owned publications, has yet again shown its inability to accept the free flow of economic news,” the two organisations said, reiterating their call for an immediate end to news censorship.The Literary Works Scrutinising Committee (LWSC), the interior ministry offshoot responsible for censorship, summoned the editors of Burma’s main privately-owned newspapers to a meeting on 19 February at which they were threatened with reprisals if they published any reports about the serious banking crisis. This news blackout would prevent the crisis from being exacerbated and put a stop to rumours, officials said.Journalists based in Rangoon told Reporters Without Borders and the BMA in the past few days that it was still impossible for them to report on the banking crisis. “I wrote three stories on the subject and they were all rejected. It’s very frustrating,” one said. No report has appeared on the crisis, not even in the privately-owned English-language Myanmar Times.The banking crisis was set off by the government’s decision to close a dozen savings and loan institutions that were offering better interest rates than the banks. On 20 February, the central bank limited transfers and cash withdrawals from the country’s 20 banks. Hundreds of Burmese line up outside banks every day, especially the Asia Wealth Bank, in an attempt to make cash withdrawals on their savings.A serious financial crisis in 1988 set off the first demonstrations that led to the emergence of the pro-democracy movement led by Aung San Suu Kyi.Burmese language foreign radio stations meanwhile reported that the authorities had banned the publication of any reports about the death on February 17 of 14 students in a bus crash on the road from Syriam to Rangoon. Organisation last_img read more

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first_img Previous articleLimerick councillor calls for an end to ‘financial terror’Next articleCutting Edge award for Limerick theatre company Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie The past presidents of Limerick Chamberby Bernie [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Limerick Chamber, one of the oldest and most important institutions in the city will be celebrating its 200th anniversary in 2015. As part of the celebrations, an important new book on the Chamber’s history has been commissioned and is being researched and written by two well-known professional historians, Dr Matthew Potter and Sharon Slater.Although the Chamber’s bicentenary is dated from the granting of its charter by King George III on 2 June 1815, it had actually been in existence for eight years before that.On 7 May 1807 a number of Limerick merchants met and resolved that “it appears to this meeting that it would be serviceable to the trade of this city to establish a Committee of Merchants or a Chamber of Commerce.’Thus began an institution which has made an enormous impact on Limerick over the past 200 years. Starting with 60 members in 1807, it now boasts more than 450 members drawn from every sector of the region’s business community.The purpose of the Chamber was to promote and protect the interests of the business community of Limerick and from the beginning it set about these tasks with gusto.In the early nineteenth century, Limerick city had a booming economy, which was reflected in the building of the magnificent Georgian quarter of Newtown Pery, but its dynamic business community was being held back by an antiquated administrative structure and the port was seriously neglected.The Chamber took over the running of the port itself for a few years and carried out significant improvements to facilitate its use by more ships. It also regulated the highly important butter trade, improved the collection of tolls and worked hard to promote the linen industry in the city.Later, the Chamber persuaded the British government to reduce the huge debt incurred by the Harbour Commissioners in developing the port. As a result, the Limerick Chamber became one of the busiest and most dynamic chambers in the world at the time.Over the years, the Chamber had many dynamic presidents, whose names are a reminder of Limerick’s renowned commercial traditions: Sir James Spaight, James Bannatyne, Sir Alexander Shaw, Sir Thomas Cleeve. Some of these names are also a reminder that the Chamber was once a bastion of Unionism.In 1885, when the nationalist-dominated Corporation refused to meet the Prince and Princess of Wales (later King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra)  on their visit to Limerick, the Chamber greeted them instead at a reception held in the railway station.Between 1808 and 1824 the organisation spent considerable sums to encourage economic development in areas like agricultural improvements, protecting the Shannon salmon fishery, repairing the city market and regulating slaughterhouses.It threw its weight behind Muintir Na Tir Community schemes such as the Penny in the Pound Scheme of 1941-45 which provided cheap and free fuel to the city’s poor. The scheme provided 1 pence of every pound earned by employers and employees to go towards free fuel for the poor. Another scheme at the time was the Potato Scheme. Of the 126 acres planted at Shanagolden and Murroe, the Chamber had secured 100 acres on behalf of its members for the growing and selling of cheap potatoes.The present home of Limerick Chamber (96 O’Connell Street), had an interesting history and to this day retains much of its original Georgian layout and architectural detailing.  Memories from Bridie Breen, who was born in the building 93 years ago, will add colour to this chapter.These are only a few episodes from the history of Limerick Chamber, which promises to be a comprehensive, lively and lavishly illustrated book, packed with dramatic events and interesting personalities, all set within the larger context of Limerick’s economic and social history. From a Limerick perspective, It will be one of the most interesting books to appear on the bookshelves this year. Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live TAGSDr Matthew PotterlimerickLIMERICK ChamberSharon Slater Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email Printcenter_img WhatsApp WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Twitter Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live NewsBreaking newsChamber brought to bookBy Staff Reporter – July 10, 2015 602 Facebook Linkedin Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgLuke Fairfield scored four touchdowns in four different ways, Will Omey had a hat trick as well and the St. Bernard’s Crusaders put up 59 points in the first half of a 61-28 demolition of the visiting Albany Cougars in the first round of the North Coast Section Division-IV playoffs, Saturday afternoon in Eureka.After stretch of five difficult games during which the Crusaders went 1-4 to end their season, No. 5 seed St. Bernard’s (7-4) enjoyed its first easy day in quite some time against No. …last_img

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first_imgWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material 20 September 2010 A South African consortium has been chosen to host one of two African regional mobile applications laboratories, focal points for Africans seeking to increase the competitiveness of innovative enterprises working in mobile content and applications. The consortium, comprising the Meraka Institute of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), the Innovation Hub, Innovation Lab and Ungana-Afrika, will host the Southern African laboratory of the African Regional Mobile Application Laboratory. Another consortium, comprising Nairobi’s iHub, eMobilis, the World Wide Web Foundation and the University of Nairobi School of Computing and Informatics, has been chosen to host the East African laboratory. Announcing the two winners at the AITEC East African ICT Summit in Nairobi earlier this month, infoDev’s lead ICT policy specialist, Tim Kelly, said they had been chosen from 39 applicants. “Mobile applications hold great promise for Africa’s development,” Kelly said. “On the user side, applications such as M-Pesa in Kenya, or the Shuttleworth Foundation M-Novels initiative for promoting literacy in South Africa, are good examples of the potentially transformational effect they can have. “On the supply side, Africa’s developers are well-positioned to break into this emerging market, which is characterised by high growth and low barriers to entry.” According to infoDev, a global development financing programme founded and supported by the World Bank, the establishment of the two labs is evidence of the increasing power of mobile technology to support socio-economic development. Each lab will be a platform for building the technical skills, business knowledge and personal relationships needed to transform scalable mobile solutions into thriving businesses that address social needs. Besides providing state-of-the-art equipment, the labs will also offer technical training and workshops, and connect developers and entrepreneurs with potential investors, academic experts, and public sector leaders. The African Regional Mobile Application Laboratory is part of a joint programme of the government of Finland and mobile giant Nokia. Nokia will be partnering with infoDev and the local consortia to make sure that developers have access to the latest mobile technologies and training programmes. The Southern African m-apps lab will be based at the Innovation Hub outside Pretoria. “As an established ICT research, development and innovation institute, Meraka will combine its expertise and experience with the world-class facilities and incubation experience of the Innovation Hub,” Laurens Cloete, acting executive director of the CSIR Meraka Institute, said in a statement. “This is further enhanced by the contributions from Ungana-Afrika and Innovation Lab. “Our collective strong links with government, universities and business in South Africa, and the many successful ICT collaborations within southern Africa, bode well for the potential of the m-apps lab,” Cloete said. “We see this as an ideal opportunity to continue to strengthen our collaboration with industry, in line with the recent call from the Department of Science and Technology.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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first_imgzoom Monaco-based tanker owner Scorpio Tankers has priced its previously announced underwritten public offering of 50,000,000 shares of its common stock, par value USD 0.01 per share, at USD 4 per share.The offering is expected to close on May 30, 2017. The company has also granted the underwriters a 30-day option to purchase up to 7,500,000 additional common shares.The company intends to use the net proceeds from the offering to provide cash to further strengthen the balance sheet and enhance liquidity and for the payment of costs related to the company’s proposed merger with Navig8 Product Tankers.In addition, the net proceeds will be used to fund the purchase price of the previously announced acquisition of four LR1 tankers from Navig8 and the remainder, if any, for general corporate purposes.Under the merger agreements, Scorpio Tankers will acquire four LR1 tankers prior to the closing of the merger. The remaining 23 ships will be acquired upon the closing of the merger in exchange for the issuance of 55 million shares of Scorpio common stock to the Navig8 shareholders.In a separate announcement, Norwegian shipowner Ocean Yield ASA informed it has accepted Scorpio Tankers’ request to amend the bareboat charter parties between wholly owned subsidiaries of Ocean Yield and Navig8 Product Tankers, following the announced merger between Scorpio and Navig8.The changes will reflect that Navig8 Product Tankers is replaced by Scorpio as charter guarantor and certain other changes related to the new counterparty, Ocean Yield said.“Through this transaction, which is expected to close in the second or third quarter of this year, Ocean Yield gains a stronger counterparty financially. STNG is one of the largest product tanker companies globally, and the largest US listed owner of product tankers with a delivered fleet of 105 vessels following the merger. Our contracts with NPTI, and now STNG, represents 9% of our contracted EBITDA backlog of USD 2.8 billion,” Lars Solbakken, Ocean Yield’s Chief Executive Officer, commented.last_img read more

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first_imgzoomMumbai Maersk; Image Courtesy: Maersk The Danish Maritime Authority launched a pilot project on digital certificates for seafarers, according to a notice released on May 29.The project is being undertaken aboard the 2018-built containership Mumbai Maersk, that is scheduled to sail from Denmark’s Port of Aarhus for destinations in Europe, Africa and Asia with crew certificates that are entirely digital instead of traditional paper certificates.“This is simpler, faster and safer for seafarers, shipping companies and authorities,” Danish Maritime Authority said.During the voyage, the 190,326 dwt ship will call ports in Germany, Morocco, Singapore, China and South Korea, where it will collect data and knowledge about the use of digital certificates for seafarers. In particular in connection with Port State Control.“The pilot project aims to explore the advantages of digital certificates and hopefully pave the way for global acceptance and utilization,” the authority concluded.last_img read more

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first_img Twitter Login/Register With: “Our three 2017 shortlist finalists are all remarkable artists with significant careers dedicated to the creation of solid bodies of work that demonstrate the excellence of contemporary Canadian photography,” said Edward Burtynsky, Chair of the Scotiabank Photography Award jury and internationally renowned Canadian photo artist. “We look forward to announcing the winner of this year’s Scotiabank Photography Award on May 9.”Scotiabank has a long-standing history of acknowledging the importance of photography in Canada and around the world through the Scotiabank Photography Award, as the sponsor of the CONTACT Photography Festival, and as Founding Partner of the Canadian Photography Institute – a global centre for excellence in photography at the National Gallery of Canada.The Scotiabank Photography Award Jury is composed of pre-eminent members of the Canadian arts community:Robert Enright, Professor and University Research Chair in Art Theory and Criticism, University of Guelph, Ontario, and Senior Contributing Editor Border Crossings Magazine, Winnipeg, ManitobaMarie J. Jean, Executive and Artistic Director, VOX centre de l’image contemporaineMark Lewis, ArtistThe winner of the 2017 Scotiabank Photography Award will receive a cash prize of $50,000, a major solo exhibition at the Ryerson Image Centre, and a primary exhibition at the 2018 Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival. In addition, Gerhard Steidl of Germany will publish and internationally distribute a book of the winner’s work. The two shortlisted artists will receive cash prizes of $10,000 each.The 2016 Scotiabank Photography Award winner, Suzy Lake, will have a solo Primary Exhibition at the Ryerson Image Centre during the 2017 Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival and beyond, open to the public free of charge, from April 28 to August 13, 2017.The 2017 Scotiabank Photography Award winner will be announced on May 9, 2017, at the Ryerson Image Centre. For more information about the prize please visit www.scotiabank.com/photoawardAbout ScotiabankScotiabank is Canada’s international bank and a leading financial services provider in North America, Latin America, the Caribbean and Central America, and Asia-Pacific. We are dedicated to helping our 23 million customers become better off through a broad range of advice, products and services, including personal and commercial banking, wealth management and private banking, corporate and investment banking, and capital markets. With a team of more than 88,000 employees and assets of $887 billion (as at January 31, 2017), Scotiabank trades on the Toronto (TSX: BNS) and New York Exchanges (NYSE: BNS). For more information, please visit www.scotiabank.com and follow us on Twitter @ScotiabankViews. Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Scotiabank proudly celebrates the creative vision of Canada’s most gifted photographers with the 2017 Scotiabank Photography Award shortlist finalists:Raymonde April, Montréal, QuébecDonigan Cumming, Montréal, QuébecShelley Niro, Brantford, OntarioKnown as one of Canada’s largest and most prestigious photography awards, the Scotiabank Photography Award recognizes the achievements of an established mid to later career artist and the outstanding contribution that he or she has made to contemporary art and photography in Canada.“The extraordinary 2017 finalists capture our imaginations, expose us to new ideas and enable us to see the world through a different lens,” said Barb Mason, Group Head and Chief Human Resources Officer at Scotiabank. “Scotiabank is proud to play a role in celebrating excellence in Canadian contemporary photography and to help to raise the international profile of Canadian artists.” Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgEDMONTON – Premier Rachel Notley told business leaders from B.C. that legislation which could curtail oil flows to the west coast is about the long-term health of the entire country.Notley says her government doesn’t want to impose hardship on B.C. businesses and families, but says Alberta also must safeguard its interests.About 100 business leaders from B.C. flew over the Rockies to join 200 colleagues from the Edmonton and Calgary chambers to hear Notley speak in Edmonton.Val Litwin, with the B.C. Chamber of Commerce, says turning down the taps would not be received well in his province but says the legislation is focusing attention and spurring debate on the Trans Mountain pipeline.Notley’s government passed legislation this week that would allow it to intervene in the energy sector to reduce oil and natural gas exports to B.C. and elsewhere.The B.C. government has been fighting the expansion of the Trans Mountain line and Alberta’s legislation, if implemented, could lead to gasoline price spikes and other higher fuel fees in B.C.The Trans Mountain expansion, which has been approved by Ottawa, would triple the amount of oil flowing from Alberta to tankers on the B.C. coast.last_img read more

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first_imgChicago: Rapper R. Kelly has been released from jail here after the $161,000 he owed in child support was paid. The Cook County sheriff’s office said the money was paid on Saturday morning and he was set free shortly afterwards, reports bbc.com. It is unclear who made the singer’s payment. The R&B artist was last month charged with 10 counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse, involving four alleged victims, three of whom were minors. Also Read – Hilarie Burton, Jeffery Dean Morgan tie the knot He pleaded not guilty to all the charges and was released on bail after spending three nights in jail. If convicted, he faces three to seven years in prison on each charge. As he walked out of jail on Saturday, CNN quoted him as saying: “We’re going to straighten all this stuff out.” The singer had been prepared to pay up to $60,000 of what he owed to his former wife, Andrea Kelly, and their three children, but the judge had required the full amount and ordered him detained. The singer’s defence attorney had previously said the singer was having financial difficulties and his finances were a “mess”. Kelly has been a target of a boycott campaign, and his recording contract has been cancelled.last_img read more

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