first_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday More Cool Stuff First Heatwave Expected Next Week Giving Back Tournament of Roses Foundation Announces 2016 Grant Recipients From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, May 25, 2016 | 2:11 pm Make a comment Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Subscribe HerbeautyRed Meat Is Dangerous And Here Is The ProofHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Female Celebs Women Love But Men Find UnattractiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeauty Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenacenter_img 5 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. The Tournament of Roses Foundation is pleased to announce the 2016 grant awards totaling $200,000 presented to 42 civic, educational and cultural organizations in the San Gabriel Valley. Six of the 42 organizations funded are first-time grant recipients. These organizations are: California Ladyhawks, Jackson PTA, Los Angeles County Community Development Foundation, Marshall Fundamental PTSA, Oakwood Brass – Outreach Project and The Theatre @ Boston Court.Since its inception in 1983, the Tournament of Roses Foundation has funded close to $3 million in charitable contributions on behalf of the Tournament of Roses Association. The Foundation assists charities in the Pasadena area by funding sports and recreation, visual and performing arts, and volunteer motivation and leadership development. These grants, ranging from $1,400 to $10,000 will help support new and ongoing programs benefiting children, teens, adults and seniors.The 2016 Tournament of Roses Foundation grant recipients are:In addition to the new grant recipients, the Tournament of Roses Foundation also announced the election of Philip V. Orozco and Amy Wainscott to the board of directors. These new members replace outgoing board members Laura V. Farber and Karen Palmersheim who provided a combined five years of outstanding service and leadership.Members continuing to serve on the Foundation Board are Katherine Martinez Kleine, president, Maxine Harris, vice president, Norma Garcia Kachigian, treasurer, Jerri Price-Gaines, secretary, Shannon Boalt, Nancy Neal Davis, Mitchell Ing, Rick Jackson, Charlie Martinson, Bob Miller, and Libby Evans Wright.About the Pasadena Tournament of Roses FoundationThe Tournament of Roses Foundation is a tax exempt, non-profit public benefit corporation established in 1983 to receive and manage contributions from the Pasadena Tournament of Roses Association, its supporters, and the general public. The Foundation supports charities in the Pasadena area by funding sports and recreation, visual and performing arts, and volunteer motivation and leadership development. The thirteen-member board of directors is made up of community leaders and Tournament members, appointed by the Pasadena Tournament of Roses Association. Organizations or individuals interested in making a contribution or requesting a grant application may contact the Foundation at (626) 449-4100 or visit its website at www.tournamentofroses.com/foundation.About the Pasadena Tournament of Roses®The Tournament of Roses is a volunteer organization that annually hosts America’s New Year Celebration® with the Rose Parade® presented by Honda, the Rose Bowl Game® presented by Northwestern Mutual and a variety of accompanying events. The Association’s 935 volunteer members will drive the success of 128th Rose Parade themed “Echoes of Success,” on Monday, January 2, 2017, followed by the 103rd Rose Bowl Game. For more information visit www.tournamentofroses.com and follow us on social media: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube. Community News Business News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Top of the News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDSlast_img read more

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first_imgIn celebration of their 50th anniversary, pioneering English prog-rockers King Crimson recently announced a three-night run of shows at London’s Royal Albert Hall, set to take place on June 18th, 19th, and 20th, 2019.While the Royal Albert Hall shows are the only 2019 dates officially booked for King Crimson at the moment, their website lists the dates as part of a “2019 Celebration Tour (Worldwide),” indicating that additional shows are in the works. Here’s hoping the “worldwide” language means they have some U.S. dates on the docket.According to King Crimson’s press release, “The band’s packed three-hour shows regularly include material from twelve of their thirteen studio albums, including many of the songs from their seminal 1969 album, In The Court of the Crimson King…The new 8-piece line-up plays many historic pieces which Crimson have never played live, as well as new arrangements of Crimson classics.”Tickets for King Crimson’s upcoming three-night London run go on sale this Friday, November 30th, here.Last night, King Crimson opened up an extensive run of late-2018 dates in Asia with a performance at Tokyo’s Orchard Hall. For more information and a complete list of King Crimson’s upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website here.last_img read more

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first_imgSt. Nicholas 8th Grade Volleyball Season opened over the weekend at the Oldenburg Academy 8th grade volleyball tourney on August 15.St. Nick defeated South Dearborn and St. Louis. It was a fun day of volleyball for the girls; they worked together as a team and had a great start to the season.The team did an excellent job at passing which led to them being able to set the ball up and attack throughout both matches.St. Nicholas would like to thank Ned Rogers and the OA volleyball team for hosting the tourney.Courtesy of Trojans Coach Debbie Gregg.last_img

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first_img Published on December 27, 2016 at 10:37 pm Contact Lucy: [email protected] AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Comments After getting rocked in its last outing against St. John’s, Syracuse (8-5) beat Cornell (3-9), 80-56, to wrap up its nonconference schedule. Syracuse was led by 20 points and 10 rebounds from sophomore Tyler Lydon. Here’s a graphical breakdown of the Orange’s victory.MORE COVERAGESyracuse fans react to SU’s 24 point victory over CornellSyracuse men’s basketball uses its size advantage to dominate Cornell, 80-56, in final nonconference gameWhat we learned from Syracuse’s 80-56 victory over Cornell Facebook Twitter Google+last_img

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first_imgMary Massei hit three home runs last weekend in a single outing against Illinois – matching her career total at the time. She also knocked into five RBIs.[/media-credit]Whether it’s hitting the ball out of the park, rallying from large deficits or shutting out opponents, the Wisconsin softball team continues to find various avenues for success.The Badgers (24-13, 8-4 Big Ten) have reached the halfway mark on their Big Ten calendar and are sitting in a very favorable position, tied for third place in the conference. They will look to continue their success and improve their rank this weekend as conference foe Penn State journeys into Madison.Wisconsin has won in about every way possible lately, triumphing in 10 of its last 11 games. This past weekend started out with a complete game shutout against Illinois by pitcher Cassandra Darrah, which was followed by a near miraculous comeback that fell one run short in the second game. The final game witnessed the Badgers breaking a school record by hitting six home runs as a team and prevailing 10-7.Winning with a surplus of long balls has not been the typical formula of victory for Wisconsin this season, but head coach Yvette Healy figures it is a product of steady commitment to team hitting.“We haven’t traditionally been a long ball team this year,” Healy said. “But our bats have really been carrying us. Coach [Randy] Schneider has done a great job with the hitters, and they’re really swinging the bats right now.”Leadoff hitter Mary Massei owns quite a stake in the recent team hitting success, putting together a memorable performance last Sunday. Entering the game, Massei had hit only one home run on the season and only three in her career. She matched that career total in just one game, with each of her three hits landing over the outfield fence.Her three home runs were good for another school record, while her five RBIs now stand as a career high. For Massei, the team effort and recognition are all that matter.“It was great to be able to contribute our six home runs and beat a school record as a team,” Massei said. “It was amazing as a team that we came together and that we’re making a difference.”This Badger team is definitely making a difference. They recently set a school record with nine straight victories, and are making a push for their first top-three conference finish ever.Their obstacle this weekend is the Nittany Lions. Wisconsin and Penn State will meet for two games Saturday, followed by a third Sunday afternoon.Penn State holds a 5-7 record in the Big Ten, but has won five of its last six after starting the season at 0-6. Its record may not stand up to the strength displayed by the Big Ten’s elite teams, but Wisconsin will not be taking Penn State lightly.“We see them as a very good team,” Healy described. “It will be a big matchup for us to see just how far we have come as a team, so we’ve really challenged the group to get excited about this series.”Traditionally considered a solid Big Ten squad, Penn State is looking to make its second NCAA tournament appearance in a row, but is just 13-23 on the season.The Nittany Lions are headlined by junior outfielder Cassidy Bell, who paces the team with a .356 batting average. If not for a midseason injury, and the fact that Penn State started the Big Ten schedule against juggernauts Michigan and Purdue, its record would likely look considerably better.Nonetheless, they will be travelling more than 700 miles to face a Badger offense that has been a dangerous machine from top to bottom lately. While the likes of Massei and Whitney Massey may provide the brawn at the top of the lineup, an unheralded freshman at the bottom of the order is actually leading the Badgers in hitting.Maria Van Abel jumped onto the scene at the beginning of the season as she claimed a starting spot in the Badger outfield. She began the season hitting above .400, grabbing the second spot on coach Healy’s lineup card.While she has since cooled down from her torrid pace, Van Abel has sustained her average at .360, doing so now from the last spot in the order. Healy has been very impressed with the freshman, noting that even when she is at the bottom of the lineup, Van Abel can still play a big role offensively.“She’s been our nine [batter] for the last 10 games or so, and she’s done a great job,” Healy noted. “She’s almost like our second leadoff, so if she gets on it really starts a lot of offense for us.”With the team’s best hitter, statistically speaking, in the No. 9 spot, offense is sure to build around her. The last spot can be thought of as a demotion or an intrinsic position. Van Abel prefers the latter, embracing the role she has been given.“I just try to put the ball in play a lot and make the defense make plays,” Van Abel said. “I just try to be a nuisance for the defense every time I get up.”In just her first stint as a Badger, Van Abel may still be learning the ins-and-outs of the Big Ten, but she still understands the team goals for each weekend in conference play.“We have been really hungry this year,” Van Abel said. “We’ve got to keep pushing that little bit extra at the end of the season to come out on top.”last_img read more

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first_imgBritish lawmakers have voted to postpone a vote on the terms of the UK’s departure from the European Union.In a dramatic Saturday sitting of the parliament, Prime Minister Boris Johnson failed to secure enough backing to hold a vote on the Brexit deal he negotiated in Brussels on Thursday.In a 322-306 vote, British lawmakers agreed to revisit the proposed Brexit deal next week.Prime Minister Johnson says he will still try to meet his deadline at the of this month.However, he may have to ask the EU for an extension beyond the October 31st deadline if British lawmakers continue to withhold their approval.The move comes after lawmakers backed a motion to rule out a no-deal exit during a rare Saturday sitting of the parliament.last_img

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first_imgPope Francis’ visit to the United States is of great interest to Catholics and the public in general, escalating this week with his Year of Mercy statement calling on priests to forgive the sin of abortion.Still, area Roman Catholic churches have been slow to organize any events to celebrate the pontiff’s trip. Pope Francis will be in the U.S. from Sept. 22 to Sept. 27, with appearances in Washington, D.C., New York City and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.This week The Two River Times reached out to 10 Two River area Catholic Churches to see what has been planned. Those who responded to phone calls said nothing has been planned.One parish, however, St. Benedict, 165 Bethany Road, Holmdel, sees an educational opportunity. The seventh and eighth graders in the accompanying school will participate in a “Pope Watch Party,” and watch Pope Francis’ historic address to a joint session of Congress on Thursday, Sept. 24, the first Catholic Pope to do so. During the session, teachers will be live tweeting on Twitter about their students’ reaction and the event with the hashtag #pope2congress, according to Denise Contino, St. Benedict’s director of religious instruction. This is being done in conjunction with the Ignatian Solidarity Network, which describes itself as a national social justice education and advocacy network inspired by the work of St. Ignatius of Loyola.Contino plans to repeat the viewing the following week for the non-St. Benedict religious instruction students.This summer St. Benedict had emailed to parish and student families information about “Flat Francis” – an approximately one-foot cutout of the pontiff – asking them to honor the pope’s coming visit by taking the good-natured photos with the cutout while on vacation or traveling, sending photos to Catholic Extension, a Catholic charitable organization, by way of the Twitter hashtag #FlatFrancis. “There’s ton of pictures on that already,” Contino said.Rayanne Bennett, director of public relations for the Diocese of Trenton, acknowledged this week while many individual Catholics have obtained the tickets for Pope Francis’ appearances in New York City and Philadelphia, “it’s slow in coming,” for the diocese’s various parishes to organize events in recognition of the visit. Given in August things slow down as many take their vacations, there wasn’t much in the way of organizing, Bennett pointed out. But now, she suspected church groups and parish volunteers will likely be working on get-togethers, watching parties, to catch the Papal events with friends. “And I think more are in formulation,” to be announced shortly.The diocese will put together a list of various parish activities to commemorate the Pope’s visit. That will be released to the media shortly, according to Bennett.last_img read more

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first_imgENTRIES FOR OPENING DAY, DEC. 26, TO BE TAKEN WEDNESDAY; GRADE I LA BREA, GRADE II MATHIS BROTHERS MILE & GRADE III SAN SIMEON ALL PART OF BLOCKBUSTER NINE-RACE PROGRAM ARCADIA, Calif. (Dec. 19, 2016)–Headed by Breeders’ Cup Sprint Champion Drefong, Santa Anita’s prestigious Grade I, seven furlong Malibu, to be run on opening day, Monday, Dec. 26, has attracted a star-studded roster of 22 three year old nominations, with entries to be taken for the Malibu and three other graded stakes on Wednesday.Trained by Bob Baffert and owned by Baoma Corp., Drefong, who also won the Grade I, seven furlong Kings Bishop Stakes at Saratoga Aug. 27, has five wins from six starts and is a leading candidate to be voted America’s Eclipse Champion Sprinter for 2016.Drefong is likely to be joined in the starting gate by Mind Your Biscuits, who finished a close third in the Breeders’ Cup Sprint here on Nov. 5 and has remained in training at his Belmont Park base for trainer Robert Falcone, Jr.Trainer Mark Casse’s multiple stakes winning Awesome Banner, currently based at Palm Meadows in south Florida, is also considered probable for the 65th running of the Malibu, which was won last year by eventual Eclipse Sprint Champ Runhappy.Also prominent among the Malibu nominees is Baffert’s Mor Spirit, who’s been idle since well beaten in the Kentucky Derby May 7. Owned by Michael Lund Peterson, he was a winner of the Grade I Los Alamitos Cash Call Futurity at two and the Grade III Robert B. Lewis Stakes here on Feb. 6. He was subsequently second in both the Grade II San Felipe Stakes March 12 and the Grade I Santa Anita Derby on April 9.Although Breeders’ Cup Classic winning Arrogate is also among five horses nominated by Baffert, the grey son of Unbridled’s Song is expected to run instead in the Grade II San Pasqual Stakes at 1 1/16 miles on Jan. 1, as he points to an epic rematch with California Chrome in the inaugural $12 million Pegasus World Cup Invitational at Gulfstream Park on Jan. 28.In addition to the Malibu, three other opening day stakes closed on Friday; the Grade I, $300,000 La Brea, for 3-year old fillies at seven furlongs, the Grade II, $200,000 Mathis Brothers Mile (turf) for 3-year-olds, and the Grade III, $100,000 San Simeon, for 3-year-olds and up at 6 ½ furlongs down Santa Anita’s hillside turf course.Santa Anita will present a nine-race card on opening day, with special early first post time at 12 noon. Admission gates open at 10 a.m. and fans will once again receive Santa Anita’s popular 2017 wall calendar free, with paid admission. Courtesy of Mathis Brothers Furniture, the first 5,000 kids 12 and under will receive a plush Thoroughbred toy and all paid attendees will receive a Mathis Brothers gift certificate.For more information on opening day events and racing at Santa Anita, please visit santaanita.com, or call (626) 574-RACE.last_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest As farmers prepare for their 2018 crop, newly released research shows that a large majority of those whose fields drain into western Lake Erie are adhering to ag experts’ guidelines for fertilizer rates and application practices. The study concludes, however, that the recommendations themselves should be re-examined to better protect western Lake Erie from pollution resulting from agricultural runoff.The findings are presented in a special issue of the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation published by the Soil and Water Conservation Society (SWCS).“Our surveys found that up to 80% of farmers are following the most up-to-date guidelines available regarding fertilizer application and general stewardship practices,” said Doug Smith, USDA soil scientist, who co-authored an article in the Journal detailing the research. “But even though the vast majority of growers are applying nutrients at or below recommended levels, the reality is that roughly 70% of the phosphorous entering Lake Erie is from streams and rivers, where agriculture is often the dominant land use. So we have to acknowledge that the agronomic data and information on which farmers are basing their fertilizer application decisions may not be giving enough consideration to the importance of minimizing nutrient runoff into western Lake Erie.”Smith points out that fertilizer recommendations currently provided to farmers in the western Lake Erie region were developed by researchers 40 or more years ago.“Since then, there have been drastic changes in factors like tillage methods, crop varieties and nutrient formulations that alter phosphorous cycling in soil and water,” Smith said. “The science that drives fertilization practices needs to catch up. The scientific community and the agricultural industry must ask whether current practices are in step with the goal of achieving optimum balance between economic outcomes and preserving environmental quality.”Public concern over nonpoint source agricultural pollution of western Lake Erie, however, continues.“The researchers believe that reconsideration of existing nutrient recommendations and wider adoption by farmers of the most effective agronomic practices can bring about a sustainable agricultural system in the western Lake Erie region,” said Clare Lindahl, SWCS CEO. “The role of SWCS is to provide the forum where researchers, extension specialists, crop advisors and growers can engage in the collaboration needed to maintain farm productivity while preserving environmental resources.”The study is available at: http://www.jswconline.org/content/73/1/48.full.pdf+html.last_img read more

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first_imgOff the Tracks will feature many top FCPX editors. In this interview, the director shares his experience filming with these experts.Have you ever been interested in learning more about the mistakes Apple made in releasing FCPX and killing off FCP7? If so, the documentary film Off the Tracks aims to answer your questions about the work that went into building FCPX. It also features many of the top FCPX editors discussing their likes and dislikes of their preferred Final Cut Pro workflows.Take a look at the trailer, which also happens to have a brief glimpse at one of our earliest reviews of FCPX.To learn more about the film, we reached out to Director Bradly Olsen for more insight. Here’s what we learned.PremiumBeat: For Off the Tracks, you interviewed many of the top FCPX users in the world. In your trailer, they all discuss their disappointment with the initial launch. Why did many of them stay with the platform? Bradley Olsen: Some of them actually stuck with Final Cut Pro 7 for a while and waited six months to a year to see what would happen with Final Cut Pro X. By that point, Final Cut Pro X had come a long way in terms of functionality. Most of the original major complaints had been addressed by that time. I think many of them looked around at the other options, but after getting used to FCPX, everything else just seems old fashioned.Even though a lot of people were negative in the beginning, there were a few voices out there that believed Apple’s message that FCPX is the future of editing. I remember paying close attention to what Steve Martin and Mark Spencer were doing — that was an indicator to me of whether or not FCPX would even have a future. Peter Wiggins was paying attention and wrote a lot about what was happening on his site FCP.co. And eventually Chris Fenwick added his voice with his podcast FCPX Grill. There’s an entire community that has rallied around this piece of software and supports it. You just have to know where to look.Randy Ubillos, designer of Final Cut Pro 1-7, Final Cut Pro X, and Premiere via Off the Tracks.PB: You had the chance to interview the original designer of FCPX, what insight did this offer regarding Apple’s choice to create such a radical redesign?B.O.: Randy Ubillos, who created Adobe Premiere in the early ’90s and went on to make the original Final Cut Pro, had a lot of really interesting things to say about that. For most people, getting into editing Final Cut Pro 7 took a lot of time and energy. There were entire classes devoted to tips and tricks that involved complicated steps in order to accomplish tasks that could have been made simpler in the application itself. According to Randy, this pointed to an underlying problem with the software.Randy talked to editors who were doing long-form projects, and when they were close to being done, they didn’t want to make any changes at the beginning of a sequence because they were afraid they might accidentally knock things out of sync further down the timeline. The vertical relationships between titles, music, effects, and the corresponding video clips only existed in the editor’s head. The existing software had no mechanisms to keep track of that. Clearly there were some fundamental issues with the traditional track-based paradigm that could use some improvement.It’s interesting to look back at what lead up to Apple making this change. By Final Cut Pro version 5, Apple had come to be a dominant NLE and the preferred choice for many editors, especially people making documentaries and working outside of the Hollywood system. But the only thing that really differentiated Final Cut from the competition at that time was its lower price. It pretty much functioned the same way as the other systems. If you think about it doing the same thing as everybody else only for cheaper is not really the Apple way of doing things.From what I’ve gathered, there must have been a 64bit version of Final Cut being developed sometime after the release of Final Cut Pro 5 or 6. It was probably what most editors wanted at that time: a 64bit version that looked and functioned largely the same way as the previous versions. Steve Jobs saw that and told the Final Cut team that that wasn’t the direction they would be taking. If they were going to rewrite the software for 64bit, there was an opportunity the rethink the fundamentals of video editing for the modern digital era. Isn’t that what Apple is about? “Think Different.”FCPX is powerful yet easy-to-use software. That was what Apple set out to do when they started making it. Because Apple is a company with multiple revenue sources, they could afford to take a risk with Final Cut in a way that software-only companies can’t do as easily. A software-only company can’t risk alienating their existing users even if it means that they’ll get a wider user base in the long run. Based off the information I’ve been able to gather, it appears that Final Cut Pro X has done far better financially than its predecessor did, so I’d say Apple took a gamble and won.PB: For many people, the redesign of Final Cut Pro was the catalyst to switch to Premiere. Did many of your subjects attempt the switch as well? If so, what made them stick with FCPX?B.O.: A few of them did talk about trying Premiere. First I’d like to clarify that my documentary isn’t really about NLE wars, although I certainly could’ve taken it that direction. I compare the differences between the paradigms of course, but I didn’t feel like it would be productive to slam one piece of software in an attempt to build up the other.Now with that out of the way, people may or may not remember, but when FCPX was launched in 2011, Adobe Premiere CS5 was not really a suitable replacement for Final Cut Pro 7. CS6 was released in 2012, and that was Adobe’s attempt to get Premiere up to speed. If you were paying attention to FCPX, then you knew that it was also undergoing rapid development at that time. If you were excited by the new ideas in FCPX 10.0 but bugged by the lack of XML, Multicam, and Broadcast Monitoring, then the majority of your complaints were addressed by early 2012. If you were turned off by Apple’s ideas for Final Cut entirely then Premiere was the comfortable choice.Several of the editors I talked to did try Premiere for a time. But they had serious issues with its stability in a professional environment. I’ve heard plenty of stories about how Premiere had failed when put under pressure, and that’s unacceptable when you’re on a job. Most of those stories were from a few years ago, and Premiere has come a long way since that time. Although I do hear about serious bugs from time to time. In fact, there was that whole deleted media assets debacle just a couple months ago. But even I use Premiere on occasion; it has a solid foothold in the professional video world.I think what makes people like me prefer FCPX is that we’ve worked a lot in traditional systems, and we’ve embraced this new way of doing things. We see that we can get things done faster. It’s hard to convince experienced editors on other platforms that it really is much faster. When they try it out for the first time, the magnetic timeline seems counter-intuitive. But once you get over the learning curve, there’s a switch that just clicks in your head, and editing has never been more enjoyable. Beginners don’t have that learning curve because they aren’t mired down in old ways of thinking. They get up to speed quickly and accomplish previously complicated tasks with ease. That means more kids are going to get into this and that makes me hopeful for FCPX’s future.PB: During your research, did you find that Apple was surprised at the resistance and lackluster reviews at the launch of FCPX?B.O.: I would assume that most of the FCPX team saw the resistance coming to some extent. In fact, Randy told me that he knew there was going to be a problem a year in advance. His idea was to give away a copy of 7 with every new purchase of X. Obviously he was overruled. But I don’t think anybody had anticipated the level of negativity Apple got for the release of FCPX. If Apple had understood the full extent of the backlash they would get ahead of time, I’m sure they would have handled the launch differently. They underestimated how loud professionals can be — probably because professionals make up such a small number of their overall customer base.Michael Cioni, Senior Vice President of Innovation of Panavision and Light Iron, told me that if you’re successful you’ll have enemies. People like seeing Goliath fall, and this story certainly made for a good headline along those lines. But a lot of those articles and early reviews didn’t tell the whole story. In fact, most of the people who were very negative hadn’t actually used the software, not in any real-world scenario anyway. Many of us who actually did give it a fair shot saw its potential. We saw room for improvement and new possibilities. A lot of people are still missing out because their minds are stuck in 2011.Glenn Ficarra, co-director of “Focus” and “Whiskey Tango Foxtrot” via Off the Tracks. PB: To me, there seems to be a bigger message with your film. What did you learn about how people react to change?B.O.: I’ve learned that in many cases it is the default mode of the human condition to be resistant to change. A lot of people don’t want to learn new things, especially if they’ve spent a lot of time learning something already that they think does the job just fine. There is also a lot of fear and uncertainty involved when taking the risks associated with making changes. I find it ironic that video editors, who work in an industry that revolves around constant technological evolution, often have the most luddite mentalities out of anybody when advancements are made.What Apple did with FCPX is divide editors into different camps. There were valid reasons to be upset at Apple in 2011, but those people who are remain angry to this day largely define themselves by their tools. They feel like they had put so much time and energy into learning where all the buttons, dials, and knobs were on the previous system, and they didn’t have the energy to learn an entirely new way of doing things. Telling them that Apple had made editing easier was not reassuring either. So now some kid can come along and do the same thing as me without any training? But if that’s how you felt, then you forgot what you actually should have been learning all along, which is storytelling! That skill can translate to any tool that you end up using.To be clear, I don’t believe that everybody who abandoned ship with FCPX are tool users only. A lot of creatives are happily telling stories with Premiere. They’ve adapted to change in their own way. But if you’re still hung up about FCP7 going away after all these years, then maybe you should ask yourself why that is. The people who got onboard with FCPX not only accepted change, they embraced it. So there’s an entire spectrum of people out there who reacted in different ways to what Apple did in 2011. The people that frustrate me the most are the ones that stopped paying attention entirely, spread misinformation about FCPX, and bury their heads in the sand when anybody tries to talk about it.Ultimately it’s probably a good thing that some older established people get stuck in their ways. It allows younger people to break in and take charge.One Infinite Loop, HQ of Apple Inc. via Off the Tracks.PB: What insight did you personally gain about FCPX through interviewing these top FCPX editors? B.O.: FCPX is being used in every imaginable way on all kinds of projects. Nobody thinks it’s perfect, but it’s going in the right direction. I think I’ve gained more insights into the people who use the software than the software itself. People who use FCPX are very interesting, perhaps a bit crazy. In general, they’re very optimistic about the future of media and enjoy challenging old ways of thinking and doing things. FCPX users are all very opinionated and don’t always agree with each other on what features should be added to FCPX next. But I think they can agree that we want to see a larger talent pool of editors using FCPX to be built up so that this tool can be used in more places. I hope my documentary can inform people in high places about the validity of FCPX as a storyteller’s tool.To learn more about this upcoming film, visit www.offthetracksmovie.comWhat are your opinions on FCPX? Let us know in the comments.last_img read more

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