first_imgA fundraising auction is to take place in Mary Alice’s Tea Room in Church Hill on Sunday with the aim of raising vital funds for a children’s playgroundThere will be a host of items on display, from Daniel O’Donnell tickets to signed local sporting items, in what is sure to be an entertaining afternoon.So, if you’re looking for a nice relaxing Sunday with a bit of cheer then the auction will start at 3pm on April 7, with viewing starting from 12pm. For more information contact Bernie on 0858510473 Church Hill community to hold auction to raise funds for local playground was last modified: April 7th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgComputer users familiar with Photoshop and other image processing programs know that an image can be divided into “layers” for making color corrections, evening out contrast and enhancing details.  Your eyes do that, too, says Alan Gilchrist in Current Biology.1  He shows a stunning optical illusion to make the point: transparent chess pieces against differing cloudy backgrounds appear darker in one than the other, even though they are identical (see image and source paper by Anderson and Winawer in Nature.2)  Clearly, the brain is interpreting the pieces in relation to their context.    The rods and cones in your eye are not just light collectors that pass on signals direct to the brain.  Image processing is done before the brain gets the data (see 05/22/2003 entry).  Scientists are narrowing down theories for how this works.  Apparently, the rods and cones are not just sharing data with neighboring receptors, nor are they arranged into frameworks like states on a map.  The leading theory is that the eye decomposes the image into layers, and uses complex mathematical algorithms to “decompose” the combined image into its parts, including contrast, brightness, hue, illumination and saturation:For example, a red book on the dashboard of your car casts a red reflection in the windshield.  Through the reflection you perceive distant objects, including green grass, in their normal colors.  Light from the green grass and the red reflection physically mix to produce yellow.  The yellow is observed when seen through a small hole punched in a piece of cardboard held up so it blocks out the surrounding context.  Without the cardboard, however, no yellow is seen, only the red and green layers.  The brain is thought to split the yellow light into the red and green layers using rules that invert the usual rules of color mixing.  This is called scission.    Or consider the image of a white house reflected in the shiny surface of a black car.  Neither the house nor the car appears gray where their images overlap.  Rather the light at that location is perceptually split into a white and a black layer.    Strictly speaking, the illumination that falls on surfaces is not a separate layer.  But the same scission algorithms that work for transparent layers can be effectively applied to the illumination.  Mathematically a shadow and a sunglass lens have the same effect on the image.    When the processes of image formation are inverted in this way, surface reflectance is not merely computed, it is recovered.Does the fact that optical illusions can fool us (and fool everybody, systematically) mean that the “visual software employed by the brain” has bugs?  Not necessarily; “In principle, the errors could be accounted for by partial failures in the scission process,” Gilchrist says; ”But such efforts to model the errors have not proven very effective.”  Instead, the brain may combine the layer algorithm with a framework algorithm that is even more complicated.  Proponents of both theories are still trying to figure all this out.  “Both sides are open to an integration of the two approaches,” he says.  “Stay tuned.”1Alan L. Gilchrist, “Lightness Perception: Seeing One Color through Another,” Current Biology, Vol 15, R330-R332, 10 May 2005.2Anderson and Winawer, “Image segmentation and lightness perception,” Nature 34, 79-83 (3 March 2005) | doi: 10.1038/nature03271.Stay tuned: that implies we have limited ability to fathom such design.  Speaking of staying tuned, our ears do a similar kind of processing.  Students of advanced mathematics know that through Fourier Analysis and other techniques, one can separate out the individual contributors to a complex waveform.  For instance, your ear hears a hugely complex single waveform when listening to a symphony orchestra, but you are able to discern the individual sounds of the oboe, violin, trumpet, horn, timpani and all the rest.    It should be noted that our confusion with optical illusions should not cause us to infer errors in the code.  For one thing, our eyes were designed to operate in our natural habitat, not in the pages of books of optical illusions.  Second, the ability of humans to trick the software with illusions shows that humans have creative ability to alter a designed system and understand how it was tricked.  The algorithms of our image processing organs work for the environment for which they were designed.  They pull together the best responses to a vast array of possible inputs.  This is constrained optimization, the art of achieving the ideal compromise between competing inputs and priorities.    Gilchrist credits Johannes Kepler, one of the champion creation scientists in our online book, with discovering “that an image of whatever we look at is projected onto the rear inner surface of the eye,” just like in a camera obscura.  Ever since then, he says, “it has been natural to assume that the rods and cones function much as modern day photocells, reporting the point-by-point intensity of light in the image.”  Now we are realizing that the truth is far more amazing.  If Kepler’s discovery was marvelous to him, how much more should these recent discoveries make us stand in awe of the supreme optician of the universe?  (See also 05/09/2002 entry.)(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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first_img Details of the master plan for the Greater Bernard Lodge Development in St. Catherine are being finalised.Urban Planner, Martin Addington, said establishment of the water and sewerage infrastructure and the allocation of remaining blocks of land to interested private developers, are among the areas being firmed up.“A competitive tendering process will begin for the land development in short order,” he told JIS News during a media sensitisation and tour of the areas to be developed under the project on February 22.Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, in March 2018, announced that Cabinet has approved the Bernard Lodge Land Use Master Plan for the development of a new town in the area once dedicated to sugar-cane farming and sugar manufacture.The development includes the provision of shared infrastructure services, residential housing, commercial offices and light industrial operations.The Greater Bernard Lodge Development is situated on roughly 4,677 acres of land and falls between the Spanish Town and Portmore urban areas.Mr. Addington noted that the project area is bordered by the Lakes Pen main road to the north, Portmore Municipal Boulevard and Caribbean Estates to the south, and Phoenix Park and the Dunbeholden Road to the west.Approximately 2,338.5 acres will be used for the construction of 17,000 houses, and establishment of light manufacturing plants and agro-processing facilities. Social services such as schools and health facilities are included.The remaining 2,338.5 acres of land space will be placed into agriculture with existing irrigation facilities relocated and established in this zone. Markets will also be set up.In an interview with JIS News during the tour, Chairman of the Enterprise Team formed to lead the Bernard Lodge master plan, Joseph Shoucair, said the overarching aim is to have an integrated development with “farming, manufacturing, light industry and housing”.“It will not only provide accommodations but it will move away from the dormitory concept, which exists in Portmore where everybody sleeps there but works in Kingston and Spanish Town. So you would have people who live here (in the Bernard Lodge Development) but also work there,” he noted.Mr. Shoucair informed that there are 122 leases for land in the area, and people occupying those parcels will be compensated and some relocated.“We are putting them (farmers with agriculture leases) in an area that will be dedicated to farming. Those people who are squatting will be compensated too for growing crops or relocated,” he said.The touring party, led by Mr. Shoucair, visited lands located at the now defunct Bernard Lodge sugar factory as well as those lands located along the Lakes Pen main road. Story Highlights Details of the master plan for the Greater Bernard Lodge Development in St. Catherine are being finalised. “A competitive tendering process will begin for the land development in short order,” he told JIS News during a media sensitisation and tour of the areas to be developed under the project on February 22. Urban Planner, Martin Addington, said establishment of the water and sewerage infrastructure and the allocation of remaining blocks of land to interested private developers, are among the areas being firmed up. last_img read more

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first_imgImage Courtesy: ALEHeavy lifting and transportation company ALE completed the load-in of the Sewol wreck using a record-breaking number of self-propelled modular transporters (SPMTs), as part of a complex salvage operation in the East China Sea in April. At 17,000 tons, this was the heaviest piece ever to be transported by SPMTs, according to the company.ALE was contracted to perform the load-in operations of the ferry, which tragically capsized three years ago.Although the wreck was estimated to weigh between 11,000 and 13,000 tons, moving of the ferry posed a challenge, as there was no way of confirming its actual weight and CoG position until it was lifted from the sea and positioned onto the barge, ALE said.After the arrival at the load-in location, it was discovered that a significant amount of mud remained inside the vessel, that increased the weight by 4,000 tons. The company said it had to mobilize the additional 144 axle lines to receive the semi-submersible vessel from the barge onto 600 axle lines of SPMT.The ferry transport position – laying on the side rather than on the hull – and the widespread damages to the ferry’s hull and superstructures, posed an additional challenge to the ALE team because of the potential unpredictable deformations of the cargo during the load transfer from the grillage beams and the transport phase, according to the company.“This was an extremely strategic project, not only for ALE’s South East Asia region, but for the entire ALE group. Despite the short notice for mobilisation, the complete load-in operation was controlled by ALE, included the engineering and project management,” Roberto Radicella, General Manager of ALE’s Malaysia branch, explained.The ferry sank off Jindo Island on April 16, 2014, killing 304 people, 250 of which were high school students on a school trip.last_img read more

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Credit: Courtesy of NikeOn Saturday against Penn State, Ohio State will take the field at Ohio Stadium sporting a look different than its familiar scarlet and gray uniforms: black jerseys. Rumors about the possibility of the Buckeyes donning the alternate kits have been swirling for years, but on Oct. 3, Nike officially released an image of the exact style. The black jersey features big scarlet digits outlined in gray. On the sleeves, there is a scarlet stripe of medium thickness sandwiched between two smaller white stripes, which are then outlined by thinner gray stripes. For the pants, a similar looking stripe runs vertically down the side. The helmets — which junior running back Ezekiel Elliott called “beautiful” after OSU’s win over Maryland — are matte black, with black facemasks. Down the center of the dome piece runs the same style stripe from the pants and sleeves. “They’re gonna look sick,” junior defensive end Joey Bosa said. The idea for OSU to deviate from its usual scarlet tops and gray bottoms to the all-blacks came not from the athletic department or anyone in Columbus, but rather from Nike’s headquarters in Beaverton, Oregon. About two years ago, according to OSU athletic director Gene Smith, Nike pitched the possibility of veering away from the traditional threads for a game.The idea, however, was not as well received at first — at least for OSU coach Urban Meyer. “No way, no chance,” he said of when he initially heard of the concept.But then he saw them.“I looked and said ‘whoa,’ and it looked pretty sharp,” he said.  Meyer said after his approval Smith and others affiliated with the team — such as two-time Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griffin — poured over the design. But what they reviewed is not what fans will see on Saturday. Smith said they did not approve the exact prototype Nike proposed. He, along with other program confidants, made revisions to be more in line with OSU’s history and tradition.Stripes on the side of the pants, along with adding more of scarlet hue to the numbers, were two of the main updates that they orchestrated, Smith said.This process — Nike proposing an idea, then OSU offering its modifications after consulting with select players, former players and certain administrators before settling on a final product — happens every time the Swoosh suggests alternates, Smith said. Nike and OSU have been collaborating on alternate uniforms since 2009, when the Buckeyes debuted their version of the Pro Combat uniform series against Michigan. Since then, the Buckeyes have worn a handful of other Nike-designed alternates, including Pro Combat installments in 2010 and 2011, as well similar variations of the chrome uniforms worn in the 2013 Orange Bowl and against Penn State last season. When they go about formulating different jersey concepts, Smith said there is always a balance between respecting the tradition of OSU’s football team, but also trying to recognize a shift in demographic and move the program forward. “So there is that balance of respect, our history and tradition, but also moving ourselves further into the 21st century, which kind of the landscape defines that for you,” he said. “And the uniforms are part of that.” Despite the desire to move further into the 21st century, OSU does not intend to ever turn into a school like Oregon, which seemingly has different uniforms each week, Smith said. Rather, each year the school will try to pick one game to suit up in nontraditional garb. The athletic director added that next year’s jerseys are already being designed. As for what those will those look like, Smith said, “Give me a break. I’m just trying to get through the day. Obviously, I can’t share that.” OSU is set to take on Penn State — wearing the black jerseys — on Saturday at Ohio Stadium. Kickoff is slated for 8 p.m. read more

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first_imgLiverpool have agreed to sign AS Roma goalkeeper Alisson for a world record fee of £66m, reports the Liverpool EchoThe Brazil international emerged as one of the most promising young goalkeepers in European football after replacing the Juventus-bound Wojciech Szczesny as Roma’s new number one last season.After many standout performances in both the Serie A and the Champions League, Alisson had caught the interest of many European giants for a move this summer with Real Madrid leading the way.But with the La Liga side set to now sign Thibaut Courtois from Chelsea this summer, Liverpool look set to sign Alisson themselves.This new development comes, despite Roma president James Pallotta having stated back in April that they had no interest in selling.“We have no intention of selling him,” said the 60-year-old.divock origi, liverpoolReport: Origi cause Klopp injury concerns George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Divock Origi injury in today’s game against Newcastle is a cause for concern for Jurgen Klopp.Perhaps with one eye on Tuesday’s trip to Italy…“I mean zero at all. I’m sure some people will probably come in with some bids, but I don’t have any interest in selling him, he’s a great goalkeeper.”But it appears that Liverpool have got their man.The Reds have been linked with a move for the 25-year-old in the past 12 months and appear to have increased their efforts following Loris Karius’ blunders in last season’s Champions League final.Earlier this week in fact, Liverpool had a £60m bid rejected by Roma but they appear to have made a breakthrough in talks with the club now prepared to make Alisson the expensive goalkeeper of all-time.With a fee now having been agreed on, Liverpool can now officially approach Alisson and begin discussing personal terms,While the signing of the Brazilian goalkeeper will increase Liverpool’s spending this summer to over £150m, Jurgen Klopp has decided that it is a necessary addition to his squad as they look to mount a challenge for the Premier League title in the new season.last_img read more

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first_img Related Items:ground breaking, st. elizabeth, wind farm munro Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Long Bay High School construction starts RED STRIPE TO INVEST US$10 MILLION OVER FIVE YEARScenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppMONTEGO BAY, Feb. 26 (JIS): Ground was broken for the construction of a US$89 million 36.3-megawatt wind farm at Munro, St. Elizabeth, on February 25, by Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Phillip Paulwell.He was joined by representatives of BMR Jamaica Wind Limited, the United States Embassy and the Jamaica Public Service Company Limited (JPSCo). The project will generate electricity using 11 Vesta Model V-112 wind turbines, and power will be transmitted to the national grid via a 69kV transmission line running 18 kilometres from the wind farm to the JPSCo’s 138/69kV Spur Tree substation in Manchester.Speaking at the ground breaking ceremony, Mr. Paulwell said the project forms part of the Government’s push to lower the cost of electricity for Jamaicans. “The price of electricity must come down. I have a view as to where it must get for Jamaica to become first world, and for us to be highly competitive. It won’t happen in three years, it probably won’t happen in five years, but my view is that we have to have a minimum of about US18 cents per kilowatt-hour for us to achieve that target,” he emphasised.The Minister added that Jamaica’s oil import bill remains too high and investments in renewable energy are always welcome.Highlighting the value of the BMR Wind project, Mr. Paulwell pointed out that there are several new projects on the horizon from which the country will benefit significantly.“We have some baseload projects that are going to happen…a 190-megawatt LNG project which involves JPSCo, and I hear that the price should not exceed US12.89 cents per kilowatt-hour. I am very pleased, and as Minister, I am going to sign that licence the day it comes on my desk,” the Minister said. Mr. Paulwell noted that the new venture at Munro and two others will bring total investments in the energy sector to more than $20 billion.“Last week, I was nearby breaking ground for WIGTON-3 (in Manchester) and that will be an investment of $5 billion. In other couple of weeks, I go to Clarendon where another American company will be breaking ground for a 20 MW solar facility costing $7 billion. Today’s investment by BMR tops them all, totalling just over $10 billion. So, over the next couple of months, we will be investing over $20 billion in energy projects,” the Minister said.“This will record growth in our economy and very importantly for us, the creation of just under 200 jobs,” Mr. Paulwell added.Praising BMR for its decision to invest in Jamaica, Mr. Paulwell said it represents a display of tremendous partnership, especially in the present economic climate.BMR has also signed a 20-year agreement to sell power generated at theSt. Elizabeth wind farm to the JPSCo.The wind turbines are being installed on 75 acres of land which have been leased from the National Land Agency (NLA) in the communities of Hermitage, Torrington Castle and Chelsea. Recommended for youlast_img read more

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first_imgHowie Kent with the Division of Forestry says the Kenai Peninsula still has a lot of dry fire fuels, which have become more flammable due to recent warmer temperatures.: “We’re expecting a little bit of breezy conditions along the coastal areas, like Kenai, Soldotna, Homer, that kind of area. For the weekend we are expected to get warmer and dryer, which will lead to higher temperatures, and lower relative humidity which equal the possibility for more fires.”   While this summer’s wildfire season has so far been quiet in Alaska, there are areas of the state that have been sunny, warm, and are drying. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享As Alaska residents and visitors prepare to head outside for the warm weekend, the state’s wildland fire officials would like to remind the public to be extremely cautious with any activity that could ignite a wildfire. In southcentral Alaska, recent warm days and temperatures on the  forecast will dry the surface fuels and deeper layers of forested lands leaving them very susceptible to fire starts. Kent: “As people get out and they want to do some camping, and want to have a campfire remember to keep your campfire small in case the winds pick up unexpectedly try and keep your fire under control.”last_img read more

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