first_imgKhanyi Magubane The world is drinking South African wine, and lots of it. Recent figures indicate that in 2007 wine exports increased by 16% on the previous year. Su Birch, CEO of Wines of South Africa, says the demand for South African wine is now spilling over to more countries. “Whereas five years ago, 72% of our packaged exports went to just the UK and the Netherlands, the net has widened so that the UK, Sweden, the Netherlands, Germany and the US currently account for 70% of total export volumes,” she says.With the exception of the Netherlands, where sales are characterised by heavy discounting, all other major markets have shown sound growth in demand for local packaged wines, Birch says.“In the Netherlands, we are currently addressing the higher-priced segment of the market, where margins are more attractive for producers, and we are advising local wineries to move their focus away from extreme value business.” When the final figures for 2007 come in, it’s expected that the amount of wine sold will exceed the 300-million-litre mark – a record for the country. Birch projects an increase in export volumes of at least 6%.“Although a conservative estimate, all indications are that the temporary setback in sales experienced in 2006, when volumes dropped some 5% on 2005, is now well and truly behind us,” she says.All wines for export must be granted an export licence. Samples of each batch of wine destined for foreign countries are sent to the Wine and Spirit Board at Nietvoorbij, Stellenbosch, where they undergo detailed tasting tests and chemical analysis in the laboratories before licences are granted. An official seal is given to each bottle by the Wine and Spirit Board, which verifies that the claims made on the label regarding origin, vintage and grape variety are true.South African wine at a glanceSouth Africa’s winemaking tradition dates back some 350 years, when the first settlers arrived at the Cape from Europe. The earliest documented history of winemaking dates back to 1655, when commander Jan van Riebeeck of the Dutch East India Company planted the first vines. In 1659, Van Riebeeck wrote his famous report: “Today, praise the Lord, wine was pressed from Cape grapes for the first time.”After Van Riebeeck, Governor Simon van der Stel firmly established the wine industry in the Cape. He founded the town of Stellenbosch, which remains South Africa’s wine mecca. But by the end of the 19th century, local vineyards and production were in decline. As in Europe, phylloxera (a small but deadly grapevine pest) had taken its toll. To control production and the market, a large farmers’ cooperative, the KWV,was established in 1918. This became a powerhouse, which saw the industry through the slump.After 1994, the South African wine market experienced phenomenal growth. According to the latest statistics released by Wines of South Africa, the 2007 harvest is estimated at 736.9 million litres of wine, which is 27.2 million litres up from the 2006 figure of 709.7 million litres.South Africa currently produces 3.4% of the world’s wine and ranks as number nine in overall volume production. Although still considered a young market, the South African wine industry is one characterised by quality more than just the quantity of wine exported.Useful linksWines of South AfricaSouth African wineSouth African wine industry trustWine routeStellenboschlast_img read more

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first_img4 December 2008The Department of Communications is to approach the US-based Universal Service Fund (USF) to help finance set-top box subsidies in South Africa if the National Treasury turns down the department’s request to subsidise some five million set-top boxes.Digital migration is the process of converting television broadcasting signals from analogue to digital technology, to enable more efficient use of the frequency spectrum as well as better quality pictures and sound.South Africa entered a period of “dual-illumination” on 1 November, lasting though to 1 November 2011, during which television will be broadcast via both analogue and digital signals.After 1 November 2011, the analogue signal will be switched off, and viewers who do not have digital-compliant television sets will need a set-top box to convert the digital signal for their analogue television sets.Initial estimates indicate that a set-top box will cost around R700, with the government looking to subsidise 70% of that amount for five million poor households at an estimated cost of R2.45-billion.Addressing journalists in Pretoria on Wednesday, Department of Communications director-general Lyndall Shope-Mafole told reporters that the digital migration process would improve the government’s capacity for delivering services to the people.The migration from analogue to digital signal was first agreed to at the International Telecommunication Union, a United Nations agency for telecommunication.The union took a decision that protection for analogue signals would cease in 2015. Member states were given timelines per region to comply with the decision. Africa forms part of region 1, together with Europe and the Middle East.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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first_imgWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material 20 September 2010 A South African consortium has been chosen to host one of two African regional mobile applications laboratories, focal points for Africans seeking to increase the competitiveness of innovative enterprises working in mobile content and applications. The consortium, comprising the Meraka Institute of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), the Innovation Hub, Innovation Lab and Ungana-Afrika, will host the Southern African laboratory of the African Regional Mobile Application Laboratory. Another consortium, comprising Nairobi’s iHub, eMobilis, the World Wide Web Foundation and the University of Nairobi School of Computing and Informatics, has been chosen to host the East African laboratory. Announcing the two winners at the AITEC East African ICT Summit in Nairobi earlier this month, infoDev’s lead ICT policy specialist, Tim Kelly, said they had been chosen from 39 applicants. “Mobile applications hold great promise for Africa’s development,” Kelly said. “On the user side, applications such as M-Pesa in Kenya, or the Shuttleworth Foundation M-Novels initiative for promoting literacy in South Africa, are good examples of the potentially transformational effect they can have. “On the supply side, Africa’s developers are well-positioned to break into this emerging market, which is characterised by high growth and low barriers to entry.” According to infoDev, a global development financing programme founded and supported by the World Bank, the establishment of the two labs is evidence of the increasing power of mobile technology to support socio-economic development. Each lab will be a platform for building the technical skills, business knowledge and personal relationships needed to transform scalable mobile solutions into thriving businesses that address social needs. Besides providing state-of-the-art equipment, the labs will also offer technical training and workshops, and connect developers and entrepreneurs with potential investors, academic experts, and public sector leaders. The African Regional Mobile Application Laboratory is part of a joint programme of the government of Finland and mobile giant Nokia. Nokia will be partnering with infoDev and the local consortia to make sure that developers have access to the latest mobile technologies and training programmes. The Southern African m-apps lab will be based at the Innovation Hub outside Pretoria. “As an established ICT research, development and innovation institute, Meraka will combine its expertise and experience with the world-class facilities and incubation experience of the Innovation Hub,” Laurens Cloete, acting executive director of the CSIR Meraka Institute, said in a statement. “This is further enhanced by the contributions from Ungana-Afrika and Innovation Lab. “Our collective strong links with government, universities and business in South Africa, and the many successful ICT collaborations within southern Africa, bode well for the potential of the m-apps lab,” Cloete said. “We see this as an ideal opportunity to continue to strengthen our collaboration with industry, in line with the recent call from the Department of Science and Technology.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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December 18, 2019

Nation Brand FAQs

first_imgYou might have heard of nation branding but do not know what it actually means. You may even want to know more about it. In the spirit of Brand South Africa’s upcoming Nation Brand Forum, we present to you the answers to some frequently asked questions on nation branding.What is nation branding?It is about managing a country’s image, usually portraying it in a positive light.What makes up a nation brand?To create a positive image about a country, there are six things that a brand should cover. These are: business, tourism, exports, culture and heritage, governance and people.Who came up with the nation brand concept?British policy advisor, Simon Anholt had come up with the term and the practice of nation branding. He also created the Nation Brand Index, which was launched in 2005, as a way to measure a country’s reputation.How is nation branding different from product branding?Product branding is concerned with promoting a single or number of products or services, which can be very simple. But unlike the branding of a product, the branding of a nation covers many aspects that make up a country. When a foreign tourist thinks of South Africa, the images that immediately come to mind are of wildlife, Nelson Mandela, gold and diamonds. While those are great selling points of South Africa, we know that there is so much more that makes this country great, such as its beaches, its food and most of all, its friendly people.Who is responsible for branding South Africa?It might be easy to say that it is Brand South Africa’s job to create a good image of the country, but in reality it is up to every South African citizen to build that reputation.How can I create a positive image of South Africa?Start by being an active citizen, or in other words, by helping your community thrive. Start a movement, bring your ideas to life or, if you are a sportsperson, coach the children in your neighbourhood. You as a South African have the power to make this country great.last_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A relatively light amount of snow slightly altered the Wednesday plans for the 2017 Farm Bureau County Presidents’ Trip to Washington D.C. after the federal government had been put on a 3-hour-delay due to the wintry wonderland. The changes went undetected as the day brought a wealth of knowledge from agriculture-related professionals, including senior leadership of the American Farm Bureau, along with international officials and much more.Breakfast with Sen. Sherrod Brown brought forth comments from the Ohio Democrat about what he sees on the horizon for agriculture, specifically the 2018 Farm Bill.Listen to Sen. Brown speak on a question from the Ohio Ag Net about agricultural priorities going forward.170314_SenSherrodBrown_WEBDuring a Q&A session with the senator, Jim Rowe of Tuscarawas County vocalized the thoughts of farmers in his area on immigration reform. He said his community has seen Hispanic workers become a valued part of their lives and farms, in turn echoing the need for immigration reform, giving a heartfelt and unfiltered expression that seemed to reflect the sentiment of many in attendance.Hear Rowe’s question to Sen. Brown here in this raw audioJim Rowe of Tuscarawas County Q to Brown WEBOFBF President Frank Burkett with AFBF President Zippy DuvallAnother recurring theme on the trip has been opioid abuse and what Sen. Brown and more are hoping to do for the Midwest rural areas affected most by the addiction.The senator was followed by an impromptu visit by American Farm Bureau President Zippy Duvall, who, among other topics, covered the top priorities for AFBF in Washington, his interactions with Donald Trump, and even a heartfelt story that harkened the spirit of the American farmer and priorities that lie within.His genuine appeal to the common man was clear in the room, receiving a standing ovation following his talk.Ohio Farm Bureau President Frank Burkett was responsible for the last minute gain of Duvall as a speaker Tuesday morning.Burkett expounds on bringing in the AFBF president and the trip in general.Frank Burkett on day two of OFBDC 2017Due to the snow delay in place, a planned trip to various embassies was out of the question. Instead, a representative from the Mexican embassy, Francisco Sandoval, spoke to Ohioans on trade between the two countries, highlighting the value NAFTA has brought since its inception in 1993.“For Mexico, NAFTA was a big deal,” he said, focusing on the change in living the country has experienced in the 24 years since the North American Free Trade Agreement was put in place.“NAFTA has nearly tripled since its beginning in 1993,” Sandoval said. “Each minute, $1,000,000 worth is traded between the United States and Mexico.”Members spent time talking amongst their own groups on what they would present to legislators on Wednesday.He also noted that Mexico is Ohio’s second largest exporter at 13% of all exports. Canada takes the top spot. Sandoval reiterated the value of positive relations between the two countries with Mexican companies operating 246 business establishments in Ohio.Wednesday has a hefty time set aside for legislative meetings with elected officials from Ohio. Time was allowed on Tuesday for congressional meeting planning amongst Farm Bureau members ahead of those important get-togethers.“We’ve got a lot of things to talk about farm-wise, a lot of things community-wise and socially – so it’s a good day to be in Washington D.C.,” said Clinton County Farm Bureau’s Beth Ellis of Cherrybend Farms.Tune in as Ellis speaks more on the trip overall and what her group hopes to communicate on Wednesday.Beth Ellis Clinton Co FB WEBOhio Farm Bureau ate lunch with members of the Iowa Farm Bureau, in town for a similar event. The Buckeyes and the Hawkeyes heard from a D.C. ‘political insider’ that covered a wide range of topics, including the key issues at the moment — Obamacare, tax reform, Supreme Court appointments, and the Farm Bill.“The Farm Bill hasn’t been done on time since 1990,” he said. Though he hoped for a change this year, he expects quite a bit of negotiations ahead, especially in the area of SNAP benefits and safety net programs. He also brought up the point of USDA needing to harness control of the U.S. Forest Service, which takes up a near 35% of department funding while having considerably little oversight by its parent agency.The talk was followed by visits to various commodity groups covering corn, beef, pork, milk, and more.This reporter sat in on the meeting with the National Corn Growers Association, which pushed for the need to advocate for crop insurance, especially with Ohio representatives. He also spoke on the newest round of funding, in which farm groups are pushing for increased dollars to USDA’s budget — a lofty goal.County presidents and other attendees will be headed back to Ohio Wednesday afternoon.last_img read more

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first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 27, 2010June 21, 2017By: Sarah Becklake, Intern Development Officer, WINGSClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The MHTF is soliciting reactions from the maternal health community to the newly released UN MMR data. Our hope is that, together, these comments will serve as a springboard for discussion and provide momentum towards MDG5.The World Health Organization (WHO) recently published a report entitled “Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 to 2008” (2010).  After assessing global maternal mortality rates (MMRs) over an 18 year span, the report estimates that by 2008 MMRs declined by 34%.  While we at WINGS applaud the achievements that have helped reduce maternal deaths worldwide, we remain alert to the fact that MMRs are likely still much larger than estimated.  For instance, while 99% of all maternal deaths take place in the developing world, as the WHO report itself notes, researchers face the most difficulties finding reliable and accurate data in developing countries.  Data sets used to estimate MMRs are often incomplete and inaccurate. They include misidentification of cause of death, incongruent definitions, underreporting, for example in the case of abortions, and a lack of comparability across different countries and data sources.The authors of the WHO report are well-aware of the data’s limitations and make considerable efforts to compensate for these problems.  One measure undertaken was to divide countries into A, B or C categories depending on the availability and quality of data. This, however, must be regarded with caution. Guatemala was categorized as an A country, suggesting that it has a complete civil registration system allowing for good attribution of cause of death.  However, as WINGS is well-aware, after working in Guatemala on reproductive health issues for almost 10 years, governmental reporting on maternal deaths in Guatemala is far from reliable.  Reports on Guatemala’s MMRs differ widely depending on which source one looks at. For example, a UNICEF report published in 2009 estimates that the MMR from 2003-2008 in Guatemala was 130 per 100,000. The report, however, goes on to adjust that figure to 290 per 100,000 women to account for the lack of government reporting (or misreporting). This is in stark contrast to the recent figures in the WHO report, which suggest that in 2008 Guatemala’s MMR for every 100,000 live births was only 110.  The report further notes that Guatemala’s MMR has only decreased 1.7% a year from 1990 to 2008. While this is already far below the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of 5.5% a year, due to the report’s low estimation of Guatemala’s MMR, a 1.7% decrease might even be considered optimistic.  If such different estimations exist for a country listed as having a fairly high level of data, one can only imagine the discrepancies for those countries listed as lacking sufficient registration systems.While the WHO’s estimations should be viewed cautiously, the report does a good job of highlighting the need for improved data on maternal mortality the world over.  Additionally, while reporting a decrease in global maternal mortality, the report does its best to argue against complacency.  As noted, much more work is needed before the MDG of reducing the global MMR by 75% can be achieved. WINGS congratulates all those that are diligently working towards this goal.Click here for more information on WINGS-“Strengthening Guatemalan families through reproductive health”Share this:last_img read more

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first_imgReal Madrid coach Santiago Solari: This squad marvellousby Carlos Volcano9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveReal Madrid coach Santiago Solari insists he has nothing to do with transfer planning.Solari says he’s happy with his squad.Speaking ahead of Wednesday’s Copa del Rey second leg against Leganés – they lead 3-0 from the first game at the Santiago Bernabéu – Solari said: “I always say it is not my position to explain the policy of signings. The squad we have is marvellous, with a lot of young players, a lot of experienced players and they are all 100 per cent committed.”Asked to assess his forward players, he added: “They are all different players, not necessarily specialist ‘number nines’. The specialist we have is Karim Benzema and he is injured.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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first_imgReal Madrid coach Zidane slammed for taking day offby Carlos Volcanoa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveOutspoken Spanish pundit Josep Pedrerol has launched a withering attack on Real Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane.The Frenchman is under huge pressure after a poor start to the season and this week’s 3-0 humbling at Champions League opponents PSG.Speaking on his El Chiringuito show, Pedrerol blasted: “Zidane always speaks of intensity, that’s enough. “The physical preparation was wrong, almost all the players got injured. Why does Zidane not explain the disaster in midfield? Why does he say Real suffer in the middle of the field but let (Dani) Ceballos leave? “Intensity is just an excuse, how can he speak of intensity if after the humiliation of Paris he has granted himself a day off? Zidane, the intensity begins with you!” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Ohio State outlasted Indiana for a 52-49 victory on Saturday, in a contest that felt more like a basketball game. Here’s what we learned about the Buckeyes as they struggled to put away one of the worst teams in the Big Ten. An offensive defense I started following college football in the autumn of 1998. As a native of Toledo, Ohio, my early years as a college football fan centered around the Scarlet and Gray. Granted, as I matured in age, my knowledge of the game matured too. But even as an 8-year-old, I think I had a decent understanding of what it took to field a good defense. Get pressure on the quarterback, stay with your assignments, don’t miss tackles or let the other team score. You know, everything the OSU defense failed to against Indiana, and by and large this season. I’m not sure if I have ever seen a Buckeye defense play this poorly. Statistically speaking, I certainly haven’t – The last time OSU gave up 49 points was in 1994, when they were shellacked by Penn State, 63-14. Over the past decade, OSU has arguably consistently fielded one of the nation’s best defensive units. This year, though, the Buckeye defense is remarkably consistent in one area – they constantly give up big plays. This theme was evident once again on Saturday, as Indiana scored on a 59-yard run and a 76-yard pass. 12-0 is still possible, but less probable OSU’s offense was once again prolific enough to bail out the porous defense, and the Buckeyes remain undefeated with five games left to play. An undefeated season is still possible, but after watching the Buckeyes on Saturday I can’t say it’s probable. For one, the injury bug that infested OSU’s locker room early this season isn’t going away anytime soon. Senior linebacker Etienne Sabino broke a bone in his leg last week, and will be out for roughly a month. The Buckeyes are so thin at linebacker that they turned to Zach Boren for meaningful minutes. Yes, the same Zach Boren that has played fullback for the last four seasons. Moving Boren to linebacker wasn’t 100 percent puzzling. The senior captain played linebacker in high school, and actually led the Buckeyes with eight tackles Saturday night. But the move indicates that the coaches either felt Boren’s talents were wasted in an offense that seldom uses a fullback, or they have absolutely no confidence in some of the younger guys to step up. Even if it’s a combination of the two, it doesn’t bode well moving forward. As I wrote two weekends ago, with all due respect to the likes of Illinois and Purdue, there are only two teams left on OSU’s schedule that can match the Buckeyes with talent – Wisconsin and Michigan. Both seem to be playing their best football right now, and could peak offensively when they meet the Buckeyes’ defense in November. Confidence in Kenny When sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller runs the ball, it’s hard not to hold your breath. There’s simply no telling what will happen next. But somewhere in between the dazzling jukes, stunning stutter-steps and incredible touchdown runs, Miller reminds us that there is a downside to playing quarterback in this offense. The hits. The sophomore has been taking an awful lot of them this season, and after some of them, it’s hard to get back up. Such was the case early in the third quarter, when Miller temporarily left the game after taking a shot on the sideline. Backup junior quarterback Kenny Guiton entered in his place, and the Buckeyes’ offense didn’t miss a beat. On the third play with Guiton at quarterback, he started right as if to run an option play, and then calmly flicked a shovel pass to a cutting Carlos Hyde. The junior running back scampered 14 yards for a score, extending the Buckeyes’ lead to 14. He’s probably not going to produce many highlight-worthy plays, but the coaching staff seems to feel comfortable in Guiton’s ability to run this offense. It’s nice to know that the Buckeyes can live with Guiton playing in Miller’s absence, at least for a play or two. Give an extra helmet sticker to… Carlos Hyde, who continues to separate himself as the Buckeye’s feature back. For the second consecutive week, the junior running back had a career day. Hyde ran for a personal best 156 yards, and also caught his first ever touchdown reception on Guiton’s shovel pass. During his time at Florida, coach Urban Meyer generally used quick, speedy running backs in his high-powered spread offense. But it makes sense that the powerful Hyde is having success in Meyer’s system. Those Florida teams employed an element of power in their backfields; it just came in the form of former quarterback Tim Tebow. Now the roles are reversed. Miller provides the speedy, east and west running, while Hyde bullies his way through the middle. The combination is certainly paying dividends. OSU gashed Indiana for 353 yards rushing, and currently ranks eighth in the nation in rushing yards per game. read more

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