first_imgThe Lily Rose in Buncrana is pink all year round – so today’s cake sale at the popular cafe in aid of the Irish Cancer Society was easier for them than most.“Our actual shop is pink, our uniform is pink now today all our produce is pink,” says Jade O’Neill.“The buns are all flying out the door already today. There are more left for anyone who wants one.” Proceeds go to the Irish Cancer Society. PINK DAY IS WEE BUNS FOR BUNCRANA CAFE was last modified: October 3rd, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:buncranacake saledonegalirish CancerLily Roselast_img read more

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first_imgSAN JOSE — Sharks goalie Aaron Dell is still projected at the moment to be the backup to Martin Jones this season. There’s little question, though, that Dell needs a return to form after a disappointing year in 2018-19.Dell, 30, had a 10-8-4 record and a .886 save percentage last season, a considerable drop-off from the numbers he posted the year before when he was 15-5-4 with a .914 save percentage.Some of that, of course, had to do with the skaters around him and the more wide-open style …last_img

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first_img28 June 2004Six film premieres head the film programme for the 2004 National Arts Festival in Grahamstown from 1 to 10 July. Three of the new features are South African, and their high quality bears testimony to the increasing sophistication of the country’s film industry.“The Wooden Camera” by Ntshavheni wa Luruli is expected to attract considerable audience interest because “Chikin Biznis – The Whole Story”, Luruli’s earlier film, topped the box office polls for three festivals in succession.Another new film, “A Case of Murder” by Clive Howard Morris, sees Afrikaans rock singer Steve Hofmeyr cast as an amoral killer. Catherine Stewart’s “Transit Cafe” tells of a rural wastrel up to no good in the city.Three other premieres come from the US, the UK and the Netherlands respectively.Erik Skjoldbaerg’s “Prozac Nation” is based on Elizabeth Wurzel’s book about being young and depressed in America. Julian Temple’s “Pandemonium” focuses on the intense creative relationship between poetry’s two Williams – Coleridge and Wordsworth. Jeroen Krabbe’s “A Discovery of Heaven” sets a love triangle amid a galactic survey of history and philosophy.Films about art and artists include a 70-minute William Kentridge compilation (with live music by the Sontonga Quartet and pianist Jill Richards). More music fills the auditorium with Lisa Key’s “Karoo Kitaar Blues” (on David Kramer’s research safari) and Charles Ives’ “A Good Dissonance – Like a Man”, which complements the Ives component of the New Music Indaba.Dance gets a whirl with a collaboration between avant gardist Aryan Kaganoff and dancer Moeketsi Mokoena, and “Raka”, a ballet movie based on the Van Wyk Louw poem.The life and work of JM Coetzee are the pivots for four films, including a documentary feature. They are JM Coetzee’s “Passages”, “Dust”, “The Desert of the Tartars” (which parallels Waiting for the Barbarians) and “The Lives of Animals”.Helping to contextualise the debate around Mel Gibson’s “The Passion of the Christ”, the film will be screened after three other films about the message of the Christian Gospels – Pasolini’s “The Gospel of St Matthew”, Elftrom’s “The Gospel Road” and Dwoskin’s “Jesus’ Blood Never Failed Me Yet”.The search for spiritual grace takes other forms in two more films: “Heaven” (with a script by the man who made the “Three Colours” movies) and “21 Grams” – a flourish of metaphysical storytelling from Mexico.Godfrey Reggio’s filmic discourse on deep ecology is also profoundly spiritual. Four of his seminal works – all around 30 minutes long, and all featuring music by Philip Glass – will be screened.The National Arts Festival Film programme traditionally offers audiences a chance to catch up on the classics, and this year six Japanese masterpieces and seven surrealist gems are included. “Throne of Blood”, “Woman of the Dunes”, Cocteau’s “Beauty and the Beast” and “Orpheus” command repeat viewing!The National Arts Festival is sponsored by the Eastern Cape Government, Standard Bank, the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund, the SABC and the National Arts Council.Booking kits are available from Standard Bank branches and Computicket. For more information, visit the National Arts Festival website.Source: National Arts Festivallast_img read more

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December 19, 2019

The media in South Africa

first_imgSouth Africa is a media-savvy nation, saturated with print, broadcast and online offerings. (Image: Pixabay)Sections in this article:IntroductionMedia consumersMedia ownersThe futurePress freedomRelated articlesUseful linksIntroductionThe traditional newspaper market is relatively static, but there has been phenomenal growth in the tabloid market. India and China have recorded a similar trend, with newspapers targeted at specific local audiences powering through the readership ranks.There has been significant growth in magazines published by the four major media houses, and by specialist independent publishers. Many of these are international titles, such as Heat, FHM, Elle, GQ, Cosmopolitan and Marie Claire, published under agreement with their international owners.And as in any fast-paced, first world nation, online media is accessed via cellphones, through RSS feeds and via national and international news websites and chat rooms.Local media houses have general and specialised news websites which, in terms of the speed and breadth of their coverage, are on a par with the best in the world.Broadcasting and telecommunications are regulated by the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (Icasa), which also issues broadcast licences.There are a large number of television stations and channels, covering national, African and international news ranging from politics to hard news, business and celebrity news.Public broadcasting is provided by the state broadcaster, the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC), through an annual payment of a TV licence fee.  Free-to-air is provided by commercial broadcaster e.tv and subscription television services – MNet and DStv – are provided by Multichoice. In 2007 Icasa issued licences for four new pay-TV providers set to end Multichoice Africa’s monopoly in the pay-TV market, these are: Telkom Media, On Digital Media (ODM), e.sat and Walk on Water Television, as well as incumbent MultiChoice.Radio commands vast listenerships, with community stations catering to specific target audiences and national stations drawing in people across the country.In its SA Media Facts report for March 2009, OMD Media Direction found that there were 21 daily newspapers, 27 major weeklies, 660 consumer magazines, 735 business-to-business publications, 470 community newspapers and magazines, 92 television stations, 137 radio stations, and over 65 DStv audio channels.Regarding digital media, there were 10.9 internet users per 100 people, 8.5 personal computers per 100 people and 72.4 cellphone subscribers per 100 people. Web pages indexed by Google were estimated at more than 10 billion.International news agencies Bloomberg and Reuters have bureaux in Johannesburg, while the BBC has correspondents in the country. CNBC Africa was launched in South Africa in 2007. Local news services include the South African Press Association and African Eye News.Back to the topMedia consumers According to the 2008B All Media Products Study (AMPS) by the South African Advertising Research Foundation (Saarf), 48.6% of South African’s adult population (over the age of 16) read newspapers, 31.4% read daily papers and 35.4% read weekly papers.For its statistics, Saarf uses the latest Bureau for Market Research (BMR) population estimate, based on the 2001 Census, which puts South Africa’s adult population (over the age of 16) at some 31-million.Mainstream newspaper circulation is fairly flat, according to figures from the Audit Bureau of Circulation of South Africa (ABC). But this is balanced by massive growth in new tabloid-style papers aimed at the mass market.According to ABC figures for the first quarter of 2007, the circulation of newspapers with a traditionally middle-class readership are flat, with the exception of the Mail & Guardian, which went up from 42 000 in the same period of 2006 to 47 000 in 2007. In the period October – December 2008 figures reveal an increase of 12.4%, the newspaper now has 58 258 weekly sales (as against 48 292 in 2006), the highest in its 25-year history.But newspapers with a largely black, working-class readership are booming. The most notable title in this trend is the tabloid Daily Sun, which had an average 508 000 daily sales in the first quarter of 2007, up from 452 000 in the same period of 2006.  Continuing with this trend, in the first quarter of 2009 sales for Daily Sun have increased to 513 291 daily.  City Press was up from 185 000 to 201 000 average weekly sales in 2008, and in 2009 it is circulating at 195 150 weekly sales. However, Beeld sales dropped in 2007 from 105 184 daily sales to 101 972 in 2009.According to the Saarf Amps figures, nearly 22-million watch television, over 25-million listen to the radio, and just under 11-million read magazines. According to figures by digital media consultancy World Wide Worx, 38.5-million South Africans access the internet, or 8% of the total population.State broadcasting channel SABC1 has far and away the highest viewership, at 70.6% of the adult population. This is followed by SABC2 with 60%, e.tv with 57.1%, SABC3 with 47.6%, the main MNet channel with 6.4% and all of the DStv channels with 16.8%.DSTV subscribers reached the 2-million mark in November 2007.Back to the topMedia owners South Africa’s media is dominated by a handful of large corporations, with their interests stretching from newspapers to magazines and the internet. Radio is mostly the domain of the state broadcaster, the SABC, although there is a growing number of community stations.There are three main players in television: the SABC , which has three channels (SABC1, SABC2 and SABC3); the free-to-air broadcaster, e.tv ; and Multichoice , which has sewn up the pay channel market. Its bouquet is large, and it regularly adds new channels.There are plenty of small, independent media houses, which publish magazines as well as in-house and business-to-business journals. But the major media owners are Media24 , Independent News and Media , Avusa , and the Caxton and CTP Group . These four own almost all the major newspapers and community newspapers, most of the consumer magazine titles and a slew of specialist magazines, and have a finger in internet and broadcast pies.Media24 Media24 owns the Daily Sun, the new mass-market tabloid whose success has turned the South African newspaper market on its head.The paper has a daily circulation of over 500 000 and readership of 7.7-million, while Media24’s other dailies have a circulation of over 800 000. The company’s weekly urban newspapers command a circulation of about 1.4-million a week; the community newspaper division accounts for 1.3-million a week.Media24 Magazines publishes more than 60 titles – some jointly with other companies or under licensing agreements with international titles – selling more than 5.9-million magazines a month that are read by more than 8.7-million people.Its space on the internet, 24.com , was set up in 2006 after the merger of two sister organisations, M-Web Studios and Media24 Digital. It provides a range of online services, such as careers, shopping, classifieds, property, health, freemail, instant messaging, blogs and photo albums. Media24 also owns South Africa’s most popular news site, News24.com .Media24’s major dailies and weeklies are Witness, City Press, Beeld, Die Burger, Volksblad, Rapport, Sondag, Son (daily and weekly), Daily Sun, Sunday Sun and Soccer Laduma. It also has publishes a range of community newspapers. The company is owned by Naspers , which owns MIH Group, the owner of MultiChoice.Independent News & Media Independent News and Media owns 14 national and regional newspapers, publishing newspapers in most of the major cities.In Johannesburg, it has the Star, the Saturday Star, Business Report, which is also carried in its morning titles in Durban, Cape Town and Pretoria, and the weekly Sunday Independent, which is sold nationally.In Durban, the Independent Group publishes the Mercury the Daily News, the Post (aimed at the Indian market), the Zulu-language daily Isolezwe, the Independent on Saturday, and the Sunday Tribune. Isolezwe’s huge growth is part of South Africa’s tabloid-newspaper explosion, and the paper launched the world’s first Zulu-language website .In Cape Town, Independent owns the dailies Daily Voice, its tabloid, as well as the Cape Argus and Cape Times, and the weekly Saturday Argus and Sunday Argus. It also has the Diamond Fields Advertiser, which covers Kimberley and the sparsely populated Northern Cape, and Pretoria News in the capital.The company has some presence in the community newspapers and magazines markets.Its internet presence is IOL , which carries news, classifieds and information from all its newspapers.Avusa The flagship publication of Avusa (formerly Johnnic Communications, or Johncom) is the Sunday Times, South Africa’s bestselling Sunday newspaper and one of the country’s largest papers overall.Avusa also publishes the daily morning paper Business Day and weekly magazine Financial Mail, in partnership with Pearson plc, the British company.In Buffalo City in the Eastern Cape, the company publishes the Daily Dispatch, which was edited by Donald Woods from 1965 until his arrest and banning in 1977 for exposing government responsibility for the death of Steve Biko.Other Avusa titles are the Sowetan, Sunday World, the Herald, Weekend Post, Algoa Sun, Ilizwi and Our Times.Its magazine division has titles in the consumer, specialist, business and medical sectors, while Picasso Headline publishes a range of titles and takes care of custom publishing for other organisations.Avusa also has leanings towards broadcast, with a stake in the Home Channel and Summit TV, which are both carried through DStv. Its online presence is strong, with internet sites for many of its newspapers. It also owns the citizen journalism site, Reporter.co.za And it has I-Net Bridge , an electronic provider of data, news and applications to the professional investment community and corporate market.Caxton and CTP Group Caxton’s interests lie mainly in community newspapers and magazines, although it has made some forays into dailies and weeklies, notably with the Citizen and the free paper, Metro Citizen, which is available on Metrobus buses in Johannesburg.Caxton owns 128 newspapers, many of which cover the smaller cities and towns in which the other big media houses have no presence, and 13 magazines.Primedia With its businesses mainly in the advertising and content sectors of the media industry, Primedia is listed on the JSE . The company owns several radio stations, including 702 Talk Radio and 94.7 Highveld Stereo, which broadcast in Gauteng, as well as Cape Town’s 567 AM Cape Talk.Primedia’s online presence is Iafrica.com , and the company also dominates South Africa’s outdoor (billboard) advertising market.M&G Media Although it is a small group, M&G Media must be included in any overview of the South African media. The company published the highly regarded weekly Mail and Guardian, which began life in 1985 as the Weekly Mail, a newspaper that earned international respect for its fearless exposure of apartheid-era abuses. Its target audience remains the more serious reader.The Mail & Guardian was also the first South African – and African – newspaper to have its own website, with its original editors, Irwin Manoim and Anton Harber, launching M&G Online in 1994. The site is now co-owned by internet service provider MWeb.The Mail & Guardian’s ABC (Audit Bureau of Circulation) circulation October-December 2008 is approximately 58 000 weekly sales and its AMPS 2008 readership is 500 000 adults of all races.M&G is the joint owner of M&G Online , along with internet service provider MWeb .M&G Media is 87.5% owned by Newtrust Company Botswana Limited, which is owned by Zimbabwean publisher Trevor Ncube. The London-based Guardian Newspapers Limited holds 10% of the company and minority shareholders make up the rest.MultiChoice M-Net, the subscription television channel, was founded in 1986. The first broadcast, comprising one 12-hour channel, went out in October 1986. Today it has a range of general entertainment and niche channels and broadcasts to over 2-million subscribers in 41 countries across Africa.Its subscriber management division became MultiChoice in 1993 when the customer service divisions split from M-Net. It became MIH Holdings in 1996. The MIH Group is wholly owned by Naspers, the owners of Media24.Its operations include subscriber management services and digital satellite television platforms broadcasting 24 hours a day on its DStv platform.Multichoice currently offers DStv in a variety of packages, these include: DStv Premium, Select, Compact, EasyView, Portuguesa, North Indian and South Indian. Each package provides different entertainment programming and technological innovation.  A range of channels are offered, from video channels to audio channels to radio channels and an affordable monthly subscription is paid according to the choice of package.MultiChoice owns MWeb, the internet services provider that has about 340 000 broadband and dial up customers. MultiChoice also has interests in M-Net/SuperSport. Through Media24 and MIH, Naspers has interests around the world.e.tv E.tv is South Africa’s first private free-to-air television channel. It was launched in 1998 and broadcasts a full-spectrum programming service to 78% of South Africa’s population – the 2008 AMPS figures put its viewership at 17 881 000.The channel is owned by black empowerment group Hosken Consolidated Investments Limited and Venfin Limited.Through its e.news television news service, e.tv broadcasts three English bulletins each night and a daily news and current affairs show, Morning Edition, each morning. E.tv’s prime-time flagship current affairs programmes are 3rd Degree and the 24-hour E-News channel on the DStv digital satellite platform.SABC Established on 1 August 1936 by an Act of parliament, on 1 October 2003 the SABC became a limited liability company wholly owned by the state.Its national radio network comprises 18 radio stations, 15 of which are dedicated specifically to public service broadcasting. These are 11 full-spectrum stations, one in each of the official languages, a cultural service for the Indian community broadcasting in English, a regional community station broadcasting in isiXhosa and English and a community station broadcasting in the !Xu and Khwe languages of the KhoiSan.SABC radio is dominant in South African broadcasting – AMPS indicates that over 78% of South Africa’s adult radio listeners tune in to SABC radio. Its television network comprises four television channels – three free-to-air (SABC1, SABC2 and SABC3) and one pay-TV (SABC Africa) broadcast 24 hours a day on the DStv digital satellite platform.The SABC’s on-line news service, SABCnews.com attracts an average of 600 000 site visits a month.The Government Communication and Information System, GCIS, has a comprehensive list and contacts of the media in South Africa, including foreign media presence and freelance journalists.Back to the top The future The trend in South Africa, as in other developing nations such as India and China, is towards local newspapers for local readers, in a tabloid style.Content is changing, too: it is human interest, focused on the local community, local investigations and often uses local languages. Son, for example, is written in a rough, street Afrikaans.The stories are big on superstition, violent crime and local interest, with little or no sense of the bigger picture and no analysis. In South Africa, the papers falling into this sector are the Daily Sun, Son, Isolezwe, Ilanga and Daily Voice.Overall readership figures are up, according to the latest Amps report. Although the older and more traditional titles may be in some trouble, as they are in the EU and the US, sales figures are rising. There was a 43.18% increase in newspaper circulation between 2002 and 2006 and an increase in the number of tabloid publications.  A further increase to 48.6% between 2007 and 2008 has taken place and tabloid publications are still well ahead.The reasons for this boom have variously been given as an increasing literacy, less political repression, the privatisation of the media, better infrastructure and higher domestic incomes.The Daily Sun leads the fray – it is read by 3 in 10 South African newspaper readers – with sales rising from 71 742 in 2002 to 513 291  in 2009. Launched in 2002, it was the first local tabloid aimed at the black working class. Initially met with disdain by the established press, its huge sales – and the fact that it has made new newspaper readers out of millions of South Africans – have earned it some respect. Its success has been emulated by other papers. Isolezwe, the Zulu-language tabloid, has posted a rise in sales from 34 057 in 2002 to 102 454 in 2009, and has a readership of 655 000.There are also about 200 successful, small, independent papers in South Africa. There have been two attempts at daily free newspapers: the Citizen Metro is available on Metrobus buses in Joburg, while the Times is delivered daily, free of charge to Sunday Times subscribers, of which there are 130 000.Citizen journalism has some way to go. The Times is trying it; and Avusa launched Reporter.co.za, a news website, in January 2006. Written entirely by its readers, to date it has over 3 800 registered reporters who file content on a daily basis.But by far the biggest challenge to the traditional newspaper market is the internet. In South Africa, there are over 36-million cellphones in circulation (although perhaps not that many actual cellphone users), while 3.85-million people have access to the internet.Back to the topPress freedom Press freedom has always been important to South Africans. During the dark days of apartheid, the press was severely restricted.Despite the government’s legislation, harassment and imprisonment, the news was still defiantly reported. Given this history, it is no surprise that freedom of the press was written into the new democratic Constitution.However, according to the Reporters Without Borders‘ Worldwide Press Freedom Index, South Africa’s press freedom ranking is slipping, dropping from 31 in 2005 to 44 in 2006. Evident of some improvement, in 2008 the press freedom ranking picked up to 36.This still puts it in the top 50 countries said to have “genuine press freedom”. Reporters Without Borders surveys 173 countries. It looks at the degree of freedom journalists and news groups have in each country, as well as the efforts made by the various governments to safeguard press freedom.Other African countries in the top 50 include: Namibia (23rd), Mali (31st), Cape Verde (36th) and Mauritius (47th).The South African media is governed by the Broadcasting Act and the Electronic Communications Act, both of which were formulated in the spirit of the Constitution.The print media is not as regulated as broadcast media and there is no clear legislation on how it should behave. The only recourse is the Press Ombudsman of South Africa. Broadcast media is regulated by the two acts, the SABC has its own editorial policy, and Icasa sets out licensing conditions. The internet is difficult to police, although technically it does fall under the two acts.Back to the topWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.Related articles The media in South AfricaSouth Africa onlineSouth African televisionRadio in South AfricaSouth Africa’s commercial radio stationsSouth Africa’s public broadcasting radio stationsSouth Africa’s community radio stationsUseful links Audit Bureau of Circulation of South Africa Caxton and CTP Group DStv e.tv Independent Communications Authority of South Africa Independent News and Media Avusa M&G Online Media24 MNet Multichoice Naspers OMD Media Direction Online Publishers’ Association Press Ombudsman of South Africa Primedia  South African Advertising Research Foundation South African Broadcasting Corporation South African Press Association World Wide WorxProspero360 Digital Marketing Agencylast_img read more

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first_imgKhanyi Magubane The world is drinking South African wine, and lots of it. Recent figures indicate that in 2007 wine exports increased by 16% on the previous year. Su Birch, CEO of Wines of South Africa, says the demand for South African wine is now spilling over to more countries. “Whereas five years ago, 72% of our packaged exports went to just the UK and the Netherlands, the net has widened so that the UK, Sweden, the Netherlands, Germany and the US currently account for 70% of total export volumes,” she says.With the exception of the Netherlands, where sales are characterised by heavy discounting, all other major markets have shown sound growth in demand for local packaged wines, Birch says.“In the Netherlands, we are currently addressing the higher-priced segment of the market, where margins are more attractive for producers, and we are advising local wineries to move their focus away from extreme value business.” When the final figures for 2007 come in, it’s expected that the amount of wine sold will exceed the 300-million-litre mark – a record for the country. Birch projects an increase in export volumes of at least 6%.“Although a conservative estimate, all indications are that the temporary setback in sales experienced in 2006, when volumes dropped some 5% on 2005, is now well and truly behind us,” she says.All wines for export must be granted an export licence. Samples of each batch of wine destined for foreign countries are sent to the Wine and Spirit Board at Nietvoorbij, Stellenbosch, where they undergo detailed tasting tests and chemical analysis in the laboratories before licences are granted. An official seal is given to each bottle by the Wine and Spirit Board, which verifies that the claims made on the label regarding origin, vintage and grape variety are true.South African wine at a glanceSouth Africa’s winemaking tradition dates back some 350 years, when the first settlers arrived at the Cape from Europe. The earliest documented history of winemaking dates back to 1655, when commander Jan van Riebeeck of the Dutch East India Company planted the first vines. In 1659, Van Riebeeck wrote his famous report: “Today, praise the Lord, wine was pressed from Cape grapes for the first time.”After Van Riebeeck, Governor Simon van der Stel firmly established the wine industry in the Cape. He founded the town of Stellenbosch, which remains South Africa’s wine mecca. But by the end of the 19th century, local vineyards and production were in decline. As in Europe, phylloxera (a small but deadly grapevine pest) had taken its toll. To control production and the market, a large farmers’ cooperative, the KWV,was established in 1918. This became a powerhouse, which saw the industry through the slump.After 1994, the South African wine market experienced phenomenal growth. According to the latest statistics released by Wines of South Africa, the 2007 harvest is estimated at 736.9 million litres of wine, which is 27.2 million litres up from the 2006 figure of 709.7 million litres.South Africa currently produces 3.4% of the world’s wine and ranks as number nine in overall volume production. Although still considered a young market, the South African wine industry is one characterised by quality more than just the quantity of wine exported.Useful linksWines of South AfricaSouth African wineSouth African wine industry trustWine routeStellenboschlast_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest As farmers prepare for their 2018 crop, newly released research shows that a large majority of those whose fields drain into western Lake Erie are adhering to ag experts’ guidelines for fertilizer rates and application practices. The study concludes, however, that the recommendations themselves should be re-examined to better protect western Lake Erie from pollution resulting from agricultural runoff.The findings are presented in a special issue of the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation published by the Soil and Water Conservation Society (SWCS).“Our surveys found that up to 80% of farmers are following the most up-to-date guidelines available regarding fertilizer application and general stewardship practices,” said Doug Smith, USDA soil scientist, who co-authored an article in the Journal detailing the research. “But even though the vast majority of growers are applying nutrients at or below recommended levels, the reality is that roughly 70% of the phosphorous entering Lake Erie is from streams and rivers, where agriculture is often the dominant land use. So we have to acknowledge that the agronomic data and information on which farmers are basing their fertilizer application decisions may not be giving enough consideration to the importance of minimizing nutrient runoff into western Lake Erie.”Smith points out that fertilizer recommendations currently provided to farmers in the western Lake Erie region were developed by researchers 40 or more years ago.“Since then, there have been drastic changes in factors like tillage methods, crop varieties and nutrient formulations that alter phosphorous cycling in soil and water,” Smith said. “The science that drives fertilization practices needs to catch up. The scientific community and the agricultural industry must ask whether current practices are in step with the goal of achieving optimum balance between economic outcomes and preserving environmental quality.”Public concern over nonpoint source agricultural pollution of western Lake Erie, however, continues.“The researchers believe that reconsideration of existing nutrient recommendations and wider adoption by farmers of the most effective agronomic practices can bring about a sustainable agricultural system in the western Lake Erie region,” said Clare Lindahl, SWCS CEO. “The role of SWCS is to provide the forum where researchers, extension specialists, crop advisors and growers can engage in the collaboration needed to maintain farm productivity while preserving environmental resources.”The study is available at: http://www.jswconline.org/content/73/1/48.full.pdf+html.last_img read more

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first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Thomas Partey: Sometimes I feel unhappy at Atletico Madridby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAtletico Madrid midfielder Thomas Partey has admitted he’s had frustrating times at the club.Watched by Arsenal this season, Thomas says he wants to be considered by coach Diego Simeone for all of Atletico’s big games.”Sometimes I feel unhappy in Atleti,” Thomas said in a statement to Gol. “To feel happy you have to play the important matches and feel stronger and more confident.”The midfielder declared, in this sense, that he has had a “very good season” so far, “There have been games that I’ve played well.” last_img

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first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Tottenham midfielder Winks hits back at ‘Spursy’ claimsby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham midfielder Harry Winks has dismissed claims of a “Spursy” defeat to Wolves on Saturday.Winks was not having it after only a second defeat in 15 matches for Mauricio Pochettino’s men.“I have to be careful about this…” he said. “We are doing really well. We have had one defeat since ­Arsenal away.“We have had some fantastic results in the Champions League and the Premier League and it is important to remember how well we are doing and not get carried away with a defeat.“Listen, when people use the word Spursy on social media, that is their own opinion. They are ­entitled to that. But inside the club we know how good we are, we know how far we can go, we have belief, regardless of this result.“It shows how well we are doing this year to be considered title ­contenders and to be sitting here disappointed that we aren’t closer to the top.“We have high expectations ourselves and, if we don’t come away with a win against Wolves at home, we get frustrated at that. It shows how high our standards are at the moment and how ambitious we are.“We said before the game that it was must-win so to come away with a defeat has left the dressing room feeling very down. Everyone is fuming, but it is football. We are still in the race.”Spurs now have to pick themselves up for a tricky New Year’s Day trip to Cardiff.Winks added: “The mood in the dressing room was very calm. ­Everyone was very quiet and kept themselves to themselves.“Everyone is gutted — frustrated as well. The most important thing is to reflect on it and then go into the building bright and smiley and feeling positive and try and get ourselves ready for the next game.“We can’t keep that negative ­energy around, because otherwise it can affect matches.” last_img read more

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first_imgReal Madrid coach Zidane slammed for taking day offby Carlos Volcanoa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveOutspoken Spanish pundit Josep Pedrerol has launched a withering attack on Real Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane.The Frenchman is under huge pressure after a poor start to the season and this week’s 3-0 humbling at Champions League opponents PSG.Speaking on his El Chiringuito show, Pedrerol blasted: “Zidane always speaks of intensity, that’s enough. “The physical preparation was wrong, almost all the players got injured. Why does Zidane not explain the disaster in midfield? Why does he say Real suffer in the middle of the field but let (Dani) Ceballos leave? “Intensity is just an excuse, how can he speak of intensity if after the humiliation of Paris he has granted himself a day off? Zidane, the intensity begins with you!” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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