first_imgENTRIES FOR OPENING DAY, DEC. 26, TO BE TAKEN WEDNESDAY; GRADE I LA BREA, GRADE II MATHIS BROTHERS MILE & GRADE III SAN SIMEON ALL PART OF BLOCKBUSTER NINE-RACE PROGRAM ARCADIA, Calif. (Dec. 19, 2016)–Headed by Breeders’ Cup Sprint Champion Drefong, Santa Anita’s prestigious Grade I, seven furlong Malibu, to be run on opening day, Monday, Dec. 26, has attracted a star-studded roster of 22 three year old nominations, with entries to be taken for the Malibu and three other graded stakes on Wednesday.Trained by Bob Baffert and owned by Baoma Corp., Drefong, who also won the Grade I, seven furlong Kings Bishop Stakes at Saratoga Aug. 27, has five wins from six starts and is a leading candidate to be voted America’s Eclipse Champion Sprinter for 2016.Drefong is likely to be joined in the starting gate by Mind Your Biscuits, who finished a close third in the Breeders’ Cup Sprint here on Nov. 5 and has remained in training at his Belmont Park base for trainer Robert Falcone, Jr.Trainer Mark Casse’s multiple stakes winning Awesome Banner, currently based at Palm Meadows in south Florida, is also considered probable for the 65th running of the Malibu, which was won last year by eventual Eclipse Sprint Champ Runhappy.Also prominent among the Malibu nominees is Baffert’s Mor Spirit, who’s been idle since well beaten in the Kentucky Derby May 7. Owned by Michael Lund Peterson, he was a winner of the Grade I Los Alamitos Cash Call Futurity at two and the Grade III Robert B. Lewis Stakes here on Feb. 6. He was subsequently second in both the Grade II San Felipe Stakes March 12 and the Grade I Santa Anita Derby on April 9.Although Breeders’ Cup Classic winning Arrogate is also among five horses nominated by Baffert, the grey son of Unbridled’s Song is expected to run instead in the Grade II San Pasqual Stakes at 1 1/16 miles on Jan. 1, as he points to an epic rematch with California Chrome in the inaugural $12 million Pegasus World Cup Invitational at Gulfstream Park on Jan. 28.In addition to the Malibu, three other opening day stakes closed on Friday; the Grade I, $300,000 La Brea, for 3-year old fillies at seven furlongs, the Grade II, $200,000 Mathis Brothers Mile (turf) for 3-year-olds, and the Grade III, $100,000 San Simeon, for 3-year-olds and up at 6 ½ furlongs down Santa Anita’s hillside turf course.Santa Anita will present a nine-race card on opening day, with special early first post time at 12 noon. Admission gates open at 10 a.m. and fans will once again receive Santa Anita’s popular 2017 wall calendar free, with paid admission. Courtesy of Mathis Brothers Furniture, the first 5,000 kids 12 and under will receive a plush Thoroughbred toy and all paid attendees will receive a Mathis Brothers gift certificate.For more information on opening day events and racing at Santa Anita, please visit santaanita.com, or call (626) 574-RACE.last_img read more

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first_imgSome of the students in Taiwan.A DELEGATION from Letterkenny recently returned from a major international youth conference in Taiwan which has further strengthened links between the two regions.International Education Manager at LYIT, Ms Jill Murphy led the group comprised of St Eunan’s College students Dylan and Evan McCroary, along with LYIT student David Hegarty who is currently on an education exchange in Taipei and recent graduate Terence Heeney.The Youth Development Association of Taiwan, and the Taipei representative office Ireland invited the Letterkenny delegates to take part in the conference entitled the ‘Seminar on Youth Participation and International Humanitarianism in the Age of Globalisation’ organised by The Taiwanese Ministry of Education. The seminar gathered students from around the world including Ireland, Canada, New Zealand, Israel, Dominica, Japan and Korea, to discuss youth participation in public affairs and voluntary service.Speaking to the Donegal News Ms Murphy explained that the strong Donegal presence on the eight-person ‘Team Ireland’ was a great reflection of the links which have been created.“The other Irish delegates were from Trinity College and DIT. However, it’s safe to say that LYIT has been at the forefront of forging links with China and Taiwan over recent years.”During the ten day visit Ms Murphy also met with three major universities there to discuss the possibilities of signing Memorandums of Understanding which would open the doors for further collaboration between Ireland and Taiwan. “We are in the process of having these signed with the universities in Taiwan and once completed this will get students moving in both directions.Twins Evan and Dylan McCroary have been learning Chinese for more than three years and recently completed Level 4 evening classes at LYIT.Evan said he found the conference to be an amazing experience. “I learned so much about Taiwan and met people from all over the world. It was particularly impressed by the use of technology for immediate translation which meant that the same speaker could be heard in a number of different languages.”Dylan continued: “While the conference was really interesting, we also got to do a lot of sightseeing. I was amazed at how similar in some ways Taiwan is to Ireland. We left Taipei and travelled to Tainan which would be the same as going from Dublin to Donegal, they were very different.”The recent visit to Taiwan is the most recent development in the ongoing work between LYIT and the Taipei Representative Office in Dublin. Currently a number of LYIT students are studying in Taiwan as part of a scholarship programme offered by the office. LETTERKENNY STRENGTHENS ITS LINKS WITH……..TAIWAN! was last modified: November 8th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:donegalletterkennyTaiwanlast_img read more

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first_imgAs evolutionary biologists examine diverse plants and animals, it seems they are never able to give a definitive answer as to how they got that way.  Their work merely begins or continues to search for clues.  Like mothers, their work is never done.  At least this provides them job security.Box jellyfish:  There are about 50 species of box jellyfish.  Some have highly toxic stings; some do not.  Some mate in groups without contact; others appear to pair off.  PhysOrg reported that a team of scientists from several universities has “unraveled the evolutionary relationships among the various species of box jellyfish, thereby providing insight into the evolution of their toxicity.”  While this knowledge will be useful to help predict which species are toxic to humans, and which antivenom strategies will be likely to work, it does not explain how box jellyfish evolved in the first place, nor how they developed “as many as 24 eyes, capable of sensing light and forming an image of their surroundings.”  Indeed, “Why they have complex eyes, how well they see, and what role vision plays in their mating and feeding behavior remain unknown.”Orchids:  There are about 25,000 species of orchids.  These are among the most diverse flowering plants in the world.  They have the most diverse pollinators; many have structures that are very specific to certain insects or birds.  PhysOrg posted an article about the “evolution of orchids” that actually spoke of diversification within orchids, not how they evolved from something else.  “Charles Darwin and many other scientists have long been puzzled by the evolution of orchids, the largest and most diverse family of flowering plants on Earth,” the article began.  “Now genetic sequencing is giving scientists insights into how these plants could evolve so quickly.”    Genetic studies show that there is a special petal controlled by different genes than the others.  “This genetic difference enables it to evolve differently to the remainder of the flower, producing structures such as the petal resembling the female bee” in the fly orchid.  This species tricks male bees to come and “mate” with the flower, which in turn gets pollinated by the bee.  Another suggestion in the article says “The rapid evolution of so many species of orchids and other flowering plants may also lie in the fact that flowering plants exhibit allopolyploidy or genetic redundancy, in which there is more than one gene to do a particular job.”  This explanation, however, does not address why other flowering plants don’t use allopolyploidy to the same extent as orchids, nor why genetic redundancy could not be viewed as a design strategy by a Creator.  It should be noted that staunch creationists admit a significant degree of adaptive natural selection within created kinds, while denying that orchids evolved from some other kind of plant.Moa please:  “The evolutionary history of New Zealand’s many extinct flightless moa has been re-written in the first comprehensive study of more than 260 sub-fossil specimens to combine all known genetic, anatomical, geological and ecological information about the unique bird lineage,” Science Daily announced.  Aside from the fact that prior knowledge about said evolution becomes pass� with this announcement, did it really explain how the giant birds came to be?  “The many species of moa are thought to have descended from a common ancestor of other large living flightless birds that evolved on separate southern landmasses when Gondwana broke up: the ostrich in Africa; the emu and cassowary in Australia; the rhea in South America; and New Zealand’s kiwi.  Another presumed relative was the extinct giant elephant bird in Madagascar.”  That simple thought, however, must pass through a “complex history” after the land masses separated.  “We were surprised to discover just how recently many of the moa species — and probably many of the iconic New Zealand animals and plants — evolved in the South Island after the uplift of the [Southern] Alps,” the researchers from the University of New South Wales said.Bats:  Science Daily printed a story about the “evolution of bat migration.”  This story had little to do with Darwinian evolution.  It was more about behaviors of existing populations looking for food.  Even so, it involved a convoluted explanation about how behaviors evolved multiple times: “The researchers revealed that the migratory behavior over long and short distance evolved repeatedly and for the most part independently within the family of vespertilionid bats.”  Speculation rules again: “The evolution as well as the loss of the migratory behavior is probably based on the fast evolutionary adaptation that is caused by climate changes or changes in the social life of the bat.”  This composite explanation does not distinguish bats from other species that lived during the same climate changes, and fails to establish a natural law that causes evolution.  Some might dispute the claim that climate causes anything in evolution.  It was also not explained whether changes in the social life of any population are causes or effects of evolution.Cold-blooded goat?  PhysOrg and National Geographic celebrated the discovery of an extinct island goat that might have “lived like a reptile” – i.e., exhibited the ability to reduce its body temperature depending on the food supply.  “A prehistoric goat survived for millennia on a resource-poor island by living like a reptile—changing its growth rate and metabolism to match the available food supply, according to a new study of the animal’s bones.”  Of course, the goat had fur and all the mammalian characteristics – not scales.  It’s not clear what can be adduced from bones alone, or what this claim has to do with evolution, unless it is an illustration of devolution to a more primitive life history.  The diminutive goats on the island Majorca, near Spain, apparently had no natural enemies and a limited food supply.  They survived for a long time before humans hunted them to extinction about 3,000 years ago, the articles said.Flashing sabers:  Big sharp teeth apparently don’t translate into ferociousness.  Live Science said that “Study Paints Sabertooths as Relative Pussycats.”  Compared to the extinct America lion, the saber-tooth tiger Smilodon fatalis might have been mild-mannered.  This was based purely on sexual dimorphism, though.  “After generations of male-male competition, the males of some species evolve to be much larger than their mates,” the article stated.  Since saber-tooth cats have less sexual dimorphism, the males of the species may not have had the aggressiveness suggested by the dimorphism in American lions.  Even so, this says little about the origin of these animals.  It accommodates the limited variation within created kinds that a creationist would accept.Hobbitses:  The latest salvo in the controversy over how to interpret Homo florensiensis, the small-skeleton human remains found in Indonesia a few years ago, comes from Stony Brook University Medical Center.  PhysOrg reported that researchers there decided it represents a new human species – not a population of modern humans with a brain disorder called microcephaly.  Their explanation, however, revolves around different notions about what evolution would do.  Were these little people modern humans that became dwarfed while stuck on an island?  “It is difficult to believe an evolutionary change would lead to less economical movement,” said Dr. William Jungers of Stony Brook.  “It makes little sense that this species re-evolved shorter thighs and legs because long hind limbs improve bipedal walking.  We suspect that these are primitive retentions instead.”  What makes sense to one researcher, however, or what looks primitive, may be disputed by others.    Perhaps the Darwinians should tackle the more difficult question raised by another article on PhysOrg about brains.  Neuroscientists at UCLA found that the human brain has a remarkable ability to reorganize itself and compensate for disabilities.  The blind, for instance, learn to “see” things from tiny changes in heat, sound, touch and other cues.  The neuroscientists found that the frontal lobes and memory centers in blind subjects become enlarged, “perhaps offering an anatomical foundation for some of blind individuals’ enhanced skills.” See also the 11/17/2009 entry about brain size.Cannibal evolution:  Cannibals are apparently more fit than the rest of us.  They have a gene mutation that protects them from the ravages of a brain disease that would result from eating their fellow humans’ gray matter.  New Scientist called this “the most clear-cut evidence yet of human evolution in action.”  Simon Mead the University College London is all excited.  “I hope it will become a textbook example of how evolution happens,” he said.  “It’s a striking and timely example, given the 150th anniversary of the publication of Darwin’s Origin of Species.”  It wasn’t clear if Mead was advocating cannibalism for health and fitness, but it left a question begging of whether a single point mutation in one gene that breaks kuru, a brain disease, is really evolution.  Presumably the survivors are the only ones left from a population that died from the ravages of the disease.  More apt might be the question of why the people of Papua New Guinea ever were led to believe that engaging in a risky behavior was a worthwhile way of showing respect for the dead.Darwin got a little more personal notoriety – as if he even needed any more – by PhysOrg.  It wasn’t for his theory of evolution, though.  Some museum curators are glad he collected specimens of mockingbirds on the Galapagos, because it may enable them to reintroduce an endangered species back to the islands.  The observations sound downright un-Darwinian: “They discovered that the populations living on the small satellite islands of Champion and Gardner-by-Floreana do not have long independent evolutionary histories.,” the article ended.  “In fact, they split from each other perhaps as recently as Darwin’s visit and probably as the result of the extinction of the Floreana population – a bridge between the two.”We keep showing you ad nauseum how the Darwinians play their game (see “How not to work a puzzle” in the 05/01/2008 commentary).  Their explanations are not conclusions emerging naturally from the observations; they are beliefs imposed on the observations by a prior chosen world view.  Watch for the tricks of the trade: extrapolating microevolution (which is not disputed even by Biblical creationists) to molecules-to-man Darwinian evolution, tossing in ample fudge-words (e.g., this suggests that such-and-such might, could have, may have, or probably evolved); promissory notes (this promises to shed light on evolution), composite cop-outs (such-and-such evolved because of climate, or a social change, or whatever), assuming evolution instead of demonstrating it, and failing to deal with the primary question of the origin of genetic information for complex, functional capabilities.    Since critics of their game have been expelled in advance, the Darwinian storytelling society has become a corrupt, incestuous tradition.  They do not feel threatened because of their enormous power base inside academia, protected by media and legal checkpoints.  If you ever make it past the guards into their protected enclaves, ask them to explain to you “the evolution of the tendency of evolutionary biologists to engage in just-so storytelling” and see if the question even registers on their intellectual radar screens.  Most likely you will get a blank stare for a few seconds, followed by a personal attack, like What are you, some kind of creationist?  We’re talking about science here!  Guards: seize this fundamentalist!(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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December 19, 2019

The media in South Africa

first_imgSouth Africa is a media-savvy nation, saturated with print, broadcast and online offerings. (Image: Pixabay)Sections in this article:IntroductionMedia consumersMedia ownersThe futurePress freedomRelated articlesUseful linksIntroductionThe traditional newspaper market is relatively static, but there has been phenomenal growth in the tabloid market. India and China have recorded a similar trend, with newspapers targeted at specific local audiences powering through the readership ranks.There has been significant growth in magazines published by the four major media houses, and by specialist independent publishers. Many of these are international titles, such as Heat, FHM, Elle, GQ, Cosmopolitan and Marie Claire, published under agreement with their international owners.And as in any fast-paced, first world nation, online media is accessed via cellphones, through RSS feeds and via national and international news websites and chat rooms.Local media houses have general and specialised news websites which, in terms of the speed and breadth of their coverage, are on a par with the best in the world.Broadcasting and telecommunications are regulated by the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (Icasa), which also issues broadcast licences.There are a large number of television stations and channels, covering national, African and international news ranging from politics to hard news, business and celebrity news.Public broadcasting is provided by the state broadcaster, the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC), through an annual payment of a TV licence fee.  Free-to-air is provided by commercial broadcaster e.tv and subscription television services – MNet and DStv – are provided by Multichoice. In 2007 Icasa issued licences for four new pay-TV providers set to end Multichoice Africa’s monopoly in the pay-TV market, these are: Telkom Media, On Digital Media (ODM), e.sat and Walk on Water Television, as well as incumbent MultiChoice.Radio commands vast listenerships, with community stations catering to specific target audiences and national stations drawing in people across the country.In its SA Media Facts report for March 2009, OMD Media Direction found that there were 21 daily newspapers, 27 major weeklies, 660 consumer magazines, 735 business-to-business publications, 470 community newspapers and magazines, 92 television stations, 137 radio stations, and over 65 DStv audio channels.Regarding digital media, there were 10.9 internet users per 100 people, 8.5 personal computers per 100 people and 72.4 cellphone subscribers per 100 people. Web pages indexed by Google were estimated at more than 10 billion.International news agencies Bloomberg and Reuters have bureaux in Johannesburg, while the BBC has correspondents in the country. CNBC Africa was launched in South Africa in 2007. Local news services include the South African Press Association and African Eye News.Back to the topMedia consumers According to the 2008B All Media Products Study (AMPS) by the South African Advertising Research Foundation (Saarf), 48.6% of South African’s adult population (over the age of 16) read newspapers, 31.4% read daily papers and 35.4% read weekly papers.For its statistics, Saarf uses the latest Bureau for Market Research (BMR) population estimate, based on the 2001 Census, which puts South Africa’s adult population (over the age of 16) at some 31-million.Mainstream newspaper circulation is fairly flat, according to figures from the Audit Bureau of Circulation of South Africa (ABC). But this is balanced by massive growth in new tabloid-style papers aimed at the mass market.According to ABC figures for the first quarter of 2007, the circulation of newspapers with a traditionally middle-class readership are flat, with the exception of the Mail & Guardian, which went up from 42 000 in the same period of 2006 to 47 000 in 2007. In the period October – December 2008 figures reveal an increase of 12.4%, the newspaper now has 58 258 weekly sales (as against 48 292 in 2006), the highest in its 25-year history.But newspapers with a largely black, working-class readership are booming. The most notable title in this trend is the tabloid Daily Sun, which had an average 508 000 daily sales in the first quarter of 2007, up from 452 000 in the same period of 2006.  Continuing with this trend, in the first quarter of 2009 sales for Daily Sun have increased to 513 291 daily.  City Press was up from 185 000 to 201 000 average weekly sales in 2008, and in 2009 it is circulating at 195 150 weekly sales. However, Beeld sales dropped in 2007 from 105 184 daily sales to 101 972 in 2009.According to the Saarf Amps figures, nearly 22-million watch television, over 25-million listen to the radio, and just under 11-million read magazines. According to figures by digital media consultancy World Wide Worx, 38.5-million South Africans access the internet, or 8% of the total population.State broadcasting channel SABC1 has far and away the highest viewership, at 70.6% of the adult population. This is followed by SABC2 with 60%, e.tv with 57.1%, SABC3 with 47.6%, the main MNet channel with 6.4% and all of the DStv channels with 16.8%.DSTV subscribers reached the 2-million mark in November 2007.Back to the topMedia owners South Africa’s media is dominated by a handful of large corporations, with their interests stretching from newspapers to magazines and the internet. Radio is mostly the domain of the state broadcaster, the SABC, although there is a growing number of community stations.There are three main players in television: the SABC , which has three channels (SABC1, SABC2 and SABC3); the free-to-air broadcaster, e.tv ; and Multichoice , which has sewn up the pay channel market. Its bouquet is large, and it regularly adds new channels.There are plenty of small, independent media houses, which publish magazines as well as in-house and business-to-business journals. But the major media owners are Media24 , Independent News and Media , Avusa , and the Caxton and CTP Group . These four own almost all the major newspapers and community newspapers, most of the consumer magazine titles and a slew of specialist magazines, and have a finger in internet and broadcast pies.Media24 Media24 owns the Daily Sun, the new mass-market tabloid whose success has turned the South African newspaper market on its head.The paper has a daily circulation of over 500 000 and readership of 7.7-million, while Media24’s other dailies have a circulation of over 800 000. The company’s weekly urban newspapers command a circulation of about 1.4-million a week; the community newspaper division accounts for 1.3-million a week.Media24 Magazines publishes more than 60 titles – some jointly with other companies or under licensing agreements with international titles – selling more than 5.9-million magazines a month that are read by more than 8.7-million people.Its space on the internet, 24.com , was set up in 2006 after the merger of two sister organisations, M-Web Studios and Media24 Digital. It provides a range of online services, such as careers, shopping, classifieds, property, health, freemail, instant messaging, blogs and photo albums. Media24 also owns South Africa’s most popular news site, News24.com .Media24’s major dailies and weeklies are Witness, City Press, Beeld, Die Burger, Volksblad, Rapport, Sondag, Son (daily and weekly), Daily Sun, Sunday Sun and Soccer Laduma. It also has publishes a range of community newspapers. The company is owned by Naspers , which owns MIH Group, the owner of MultiChoice.Independent News & Media Independent News and Media owns 14 national and regional newspapers, publishing newspapers in most of the major cities.In Johannesburg, it has the Star, the Saturday Star, Business Report, which is also carried in its morning titles in Durban, Cape Town and Pretoria, and the weekly Sunday Independent, which is sold nationally.In Durban, the Independent Group publishes the Mercury the Daily News, the Post (aimed at the Indian market), the Zulu-language daily Isolezwe, the Independent on Saturday, and the Sunday Tribune. Isolezwe’s huge growth is part of South Africa’s tabloid-newspaper explosion, and the paper launched the world’s first Zulu-language website .In Cape Town, Independent owns the dailies Daily Voice, its tabloid, as well as the Cape Argus and Cape Times, and the weekly Saturday Argus and Sunday Argus. It also has the Diamond Fields Advertiser, which covers Kimberley and the sparsely populated Northern Cape, and Pretoria News in the capital.The company has some presence in the community newspapers and magazines markets.Its internet presence is IOL , which carries news, classifieds and information from all its newspapers.Avusa The flagship publication of Avusa (formerly Johnnic Communications, or Johncom) is the Sunday Times, South Africa’s bestselling Sunday newspaper and one of the country’s largest papers overall.Avusa also publishes the daily morning paper Business Day and weekly magazine Financial Mail, in partnership with Pearson plc, the British company.In Buffalo City in the Eastern Cape, the company publishes the Daily Dispatch, which was edited by Donald Woods from 1965 until his arrest and banning in 1977 for exposing government responsibility for the death of Steve Biko.Other Avusa titles are the Sowetan, Sunday World, the Herald, Weekend Post, Algoa Sun, Ilizwi and Our Times.Its magazine division has titles in the consumer, specialist, business and medical sectors, while Picasso Headline publishes a range of titles and takes care of custom publishing for other organisations.Avusa also has leanings towards broadcast, with a stake in the Home Channel and Summit TV, which are both carried through DStv. Its online presence is strong, with internet sites for many of its newspapers. It also owns the citizen journalism site, Reporter.co.za And it has I-Net Bridge , an electronic provider of data, news and applications to the professional investment community and corporate market.Caxton and CTP Group Caxton’s interests lie mainly in community newspapers and magazines, although it has made some forays into dailies and weeklies, notably with the Citizen and the free paper, Metro Citizen, which is available on Metrobus buses in Johannesburg.Caxton owns 128 newspapers, many of which cover the smaller cities and towns in which the other big media houses have no presence, and 13 magazines.Primedia With its businesses mainly in the advertising and content sectors of the media industry, Primedia is listed on the JSE . The company owns several radio stations, including 702 Talk Radio and 94.7 Highveld Stereo, which broadcast in Gauteng, as well as Cape Town’s 567 AM Cape Talk.Primedia’s online presence is Iafrica.com , and the company also dominates South Africa’s outdoor (billboard) advertising market.M&G Media Although it is a small group, M&G Media must be included in any overview of the South African media. The company published the highly regarded weekly Mail and Guardian, which began life in 1985 as the Weekly Mail, a newspaper that earned international respect for its fearless exposure of apartheid-era abuses. Its target audience remains the more serious reader.The Mail & Guardian was also the first South African – and African – newspaper to have its own website, with its original editors, Irwin Manoim and Anton Harber, launching M&G Online in 1994. The site is now co-owned by internet service provider MWeb.The Mail & Guardian’s ABC (Audit Bureau of Circulation) circulation October-December 2008 is approximately 58 000 weekly sales and its AMPS 2008 readership is 500 000 adults of all races.M&G is the joint owner of M&G Online , along with internet service provider MWeb .M&G Media is 87.5% owned by Newtrust Company Botswana Limited, which is owned by Zimbabwean publisher Trevor Ncube. The London-based Guardian Newspapers Limited holds 10% of the company and minority shareholders make up the rest.MultiChoice M-Net, the subscription television channel, was founded in 1986. The first broadcast, comprising one 12-hour channel, went out in October 1986. Today it has a range of general entertainment and niche channels and broadcasts to over 2-million subscribers in 41 countries across Africa.Its subscriber management division became MultiChoice in 1993 when the customer service divisions split from M-Net. It became MIH Holdings in 1996. The MIH Group is wholly owned by Naspers, the owners of Media24.Its operations include subscriber management services and digital satellite television platforms broadcasting 24 hours a day on its DStv platform.Multichoice currently offers DStv in a variety of packages, these include: DStv Premium, Select, Compact, EasyView, Portuguesa, North Indian and South Indian. Each package provides different entertainment programming and technological innovation.  A range of channels are offered, from video channels to audio channels to radio channels and an affordable monthly subscription is paid according to the choice of package.MultiChoice owns MWeb, the internet services provider that has about 340 000 broadband and dial up customers. MultiChoice also has interests in M-Net/SuperSport. Through Media24 and MIH, Naspers has interests around the world.e.tv E.tv is South Africa’s first private free-to-air television channel. It was launched in 1998 and broadcasts a full-spectrum programming service to 78% of South Africa’s population – the 2008 AMPS figures put its viewership at 17 881 000.The channel is owned by black empowerment group Hosken Consolidated Investments Limited and Venfin Limited.Through its e.news television news service, e.tv broadcasts three English bulletins each night and a daily news and current affairs show, Morning Edition, each morning. E.tv’s prime-time flagship current affairs programmes are 3rd Degree and the 24-hour E-News channel on the DStv digital satellite platform.SABC Established on 1 August 1936 by an Act of parliament, on 1 October 2003 the SABC became a limited liability company wholly owned by the state.Its national radio network comprises 18 radio stations, 15 of which are dedicated specifically to public service broadcasting. These are 11 full-spectrum stations, one in each of the official languages, a cultural service for the Indian community broadcasting in English, a regional community station broadcasting in isiXhosa and English and a community station broadcasting in the !Xu and Khwe languages of the KhoiSan.SABC radio is dominant in South African broadcasting – AMPS indicates that over 78% of South Africa’s adult radio listeners tune in to SABC radio. Its television network comprises four television channels – three free-to-air (SABC1, SABC2 and SABC3) and one pay-TV (SABC Africa) broadcast 24 hours a day on the DStv digital satellite platform.The SABC’s on-line news service, SABCnews.com attracts an average of 600 000 site visits a month.The Government Communication and Information System, GCIS, has a comprehensive list and contacts of the media in South Africa, including foreign media presence and freelance journalists.Back to the top The future The trend in South Africa, as in other developing nations such as India and China, is towards local newspapers for local readers, in a tabloid style.Content is changing, too: it is human interest, focused on the local community, local investigations and often uses local languages. Son, for example, is written in a rough, street Afrikaans.The stories are big on superstition, violent crime and local interest, with little or no sense of the bigger picture and no analysis. In South Africa, the papers falling into this sector are the Daily Sun, Son, Isolezwe, Ilanga and Daily Voice.Overall readership figures are up, according to the latest Amps report. Although the older and more traditional titles may be in some trouble, as they are in the EU and the US, sales figures are rising. There was a 43.18% increase in newspaper circulation between 2002 and 2006 and an increase in the number of tabloid publications.  A further increase to 48.6% between 2007 and 2008 has taken place and tabloid publications are still well ahead.The reasons for this boom have variously been given as an increasing literacy, less political repression, the privatisation of the media, better infrastructure and higher domestic incomes.The Daily Sun leads the fray – it is read by 3 in 10 South African newspaper readers – with sales rising from 71 742 in 2002 to 513 291  in 2009. Launched in 2002, it was the first local tabloid aimed at the black working class. Initially met with disdain by the established press, its huge sales – and the fact that it has made new newspaper readers out of millions of South Africans – have earned it some respect. Its success has been emulated by other papers. Isolezwe, the Zulu-language tabloid, has posted a rise in sales from 34 057 in 2002 to 102 454 in 2009, and has a readership of 655 000.There are also about 200 successful, small, independent papers in South Africa. There have been two attempts at daily free newspapers: the Citizen Metro is available on Metrobus buses in Joburg, while the Times is delivered daily, free of charge to Sunday Times subscribers, of which there are 130 000.Citizen journalism has some way to go. The Times is trying it; and Avusa launched Reporter.co.za, a news website, in January 2006. Written entirely by its readers, to date it has over 3 800 registered reporters who file content on a daily basis.But by far the biggest challenge to the traditional newspaper market is the internet. In South Africa, there are over 36-million cellphones in circulation (although perhaps not that many actual cellphone users), while 3.85-million people have access to the internet.Back to the topPress freedom Press freedom has always been important to South Africans. During the dark days of apartheid, the press was severely restricted.Despite the government’s legislation, harassment and imprisonment, the news was still defiantly reported. Given this history, it is no surprise that freedom of the press was written into the new democratic Constitution.However, according to the Reporters Without Borders‘ Worldwide Press Freedom Index, South Africa’s press freedom ranking is slipping, dropping from 31 in 2005 to 44 in 2006. Evident of some improvement, in 2008 the press freedom ranking picked up to 36.This still puts it in the top 50 countries said to have “genuine press freedom”. Reporters Without Borders surveys 173 countries. It looks at the degree of freedom journalists and news groups have in each country, as well as the efforts made by the various governments to safeguard press freedom.Other African countries in the top 50 include: Namibia (23rd), Mali (31st), Cape Verde (36th) and Mauritius (47th).The South African media is governed by the Broadcasting Act and the Electronic Communications Act, both of which were formulated in the spirit of the Constitution.The print media is not as regulated as broadcast media and there is no clear legislation on how it should behave. The only recourse is the Press Ombudsman of South Africa. Broadcast media is regulated by the two acts, the SABC has its own editorial policy, and Icasa sets out licensing conditions. The internet is difficult to police, although technically it does fall under the two acts.Back to the topWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.Related articles The media in South AfricaSouth Africa onlineSouth African televisionRadio in South AfricaSouth Africa’s commercial radio stationsSouth Africa’s public broadcasting radio stationsSouth Africa’s community radio stationsUseful links Audit Bureau of Circulation of South Africa Caxton and CTP Group DStv e.tv Independent Communications Authority of South Africa Independent News and Media Avusa M&G Online Media24 MNet Multichoice Naspers OMD Media Direction Online Publishers’ Association Press Ombudsman of South Africa Primedia  South African Advertising Research Foundation South African Broadcasting Corporation South African Press Association World Wide WorxProspero360 Digital Marketing Agencylast_img read more

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first_imgLOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netTNT continued to have Blackwater’s number after taking a 117-96 win in the 2017 PBA Governors’ Cup Wednesday at Mall of Asia Arena.Glen Rice Jr. had an all-around effort with 31 points, six rebounds, four assists and seven steals through three quarters for the KaTropa, who notched their first back-to-back wins this conference.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Read Next LATEST STORIES UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Blackwater, which slipped to 3-4, never led and had more turnovers (16) than assists (14).NBA legend Ray Allen, who arrived in Manila on Tuesday, surprised the fans at MOA Arena as he watched the game.Allen’s former teammate with the Boston Celtics, Henry Walker, led the Elite with 33 points and 18 rebounds.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READcenter_img “Our objective going into every game is to look for improvements. We are all aware that the situation right now is not quite well yet. We are looking for stability now. As a coach, I expect my players to play smart,” said TNT head coach Nash Racela, whose squad hiked their record to 4-2.“Today, we are all satisfied with this game. It also helped that we are getting to be complete as team,” he added. “Going to this game, we already knew that it would take our absolute best to stop the three-game winning streak of Blackwater.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe KaTropa break the game wide open in the second quarter, where they outscored the Elite, 34-15.The Elite, who have never beaten the KaTropa since joining the PBA three seasons ago, came into the game having won three straight victories but they didn’t seem like a team on a roll against the KaTropa, who led by as much as 27 points. Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Ray Allen watches PBA game, catches up with ex-teammate Bill Walker View comments WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf PLAY LIST 01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Gameslast_img read more

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first_imgView comments The Philippine delegation bound for 2017 Southeast Asian Games got a fitting send-off on Thursday night with 10 days to go before the opening of the regional games.ADVERTISEMENT Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony NGCP on security risk: Chinese just technical advisers Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo DILG, PNP back suspension of classes during SEA Games Cignal sinks Marinerong Pilipino for 1-0 lead in D-League semis Philippine Sports Commission President Butch Ramirez led the ceremonies held at the Center for International Trade Expositions and Missions in Pasay.“You athletes are the heart and souls of this country,” said Ramirez.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“When you go there, don’t just go there for yourselves. Every single Filipino is cheering for you. The Filipinos are the pearls of the orient.”Representatives of each sport for the SEA Games come up on stage. Photo by Bong Lozada/INQUIRERThe country is sending a 493-strong team to Kuala Lumpur in the hopes of fairing better this year than in the previous editions of the games. Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesterscenter_img NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ramirez also reminisced on past Philippine athletes who won medals in the Olympics like Teofilo Yldefonso, Jose Villanueva, Roel Velasco, Mansueto Velasco, and Hidilyn Diaz.The top sports official also prayed for the fast recovery of Olympian Ian Lariba, who is battling leukemia.Philippine Olympic Committee President Peping Cojuangco also told the athletes to always embody the Filipino fighting spirit.“Remember you’re always representing the Filipino people,” said Cojuangco. “The fighting heart and the fighting spirit is always there and the Filipino will never stop fighting. You are Filipinos, you are sportsmen, and you are full of guts.”ADVERTISEMENT Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ MOST READ LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Tottenham midfielder Winks hits back at ‘Spursy’ claimsby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham midfielder Harry Winks has dismissed claims of a “Spursy” defeat to Wolves on Saturday.Winks was not having it after only a second defeat in 15 matches for Mauricio Pochettino’s men.“I have to be careful about this…” he said. “We are doing really well. We have had one defeat since ­Arsenal away.“We have had some fantastic results in the Champions League and the Premier League and it is important to remember how well we are doing and not get carried away with a defeat.“Listen, when people use the word Spursy on social media, that is their own opinion. They are ­entitled to that. But inside the club we know how good we are, we know how far we can go, we have belief, regardless of this result.“It shows how well we are doing this year to be considered title ­contenders and to be sitting here disappointed that we aren’t closer to the top.“We have high expectations ourselves and, if we don’t come away with a win against Wolves at home, we get frustrated at that. It shows how high our standards are at the moment and how ambitious we are.“We said before the game that it was must-win so to come away with a defeat has left the dressing room feeling very down. Everyone is fuming, but it is football. We are still in the race.”Spurs now have to pick themselves up for a tricky New Year’s Day trip to Cardiff.Winks added: “The mood in the dressing room was very calm. ­Everyone was very quiet and kept themselves to themselves.“Everyone is gutted — frustrated as well. The most important thing is to reflect on it and then go into the building bright and smiley and feeling positive and try and get ourselves ready for the next game.“We can’t keep that negative ­energy around, because otherwise it can affect matches.” last_img read more

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first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Pellegrini adamant West Ham will not sell Arnautovic or Carrollby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAndy Carroll and Marko Arnautovic will not leave West Ham United this month, manager Manuel Pellegrini has confirmed.Both strikers have been linked with moves away from the London Stadium.”Andy will still be here with us, he is an important player for us,” Pellegrini said ahead of Saturday’s FA Cup third-round tie with Birmingham.”He is just coming back from a long, long injury, and the way he is taking advantage of his minutes he will return to the player that we all know.”I am also sure Marko Arnautovic will stay here with us. Good players always have offers but that is different to rumours.” last_img read more

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first_imgFREDERICTON – New Brunswick’s lieutenant-governor says the premier and other party leaders need to work together to avoid another election.In a brief statement, Tim Richardson, the principal secretary to Lt-Gov. Jocelyne Roy Vienneau, says the lieutenant-governor has been clear with the leaders on their responsibilities — including the election of a Speaker.“Since the recent vote, Her Honour the Lieutenant Governor, has been forthright with the Premier and all party leaders that another provincial election is not in the best interest of New Brunswickers,” he wrote.“It is the responsibility of the Members of the Legislative Assembly to elect a Speaker. The Lt-Gov knows her constitutional responsibility if the MLA’s cannot reach a decision.”The legislature is set to begin a new session on Oct. 23 with the election of a Speaker, but so far every party is refusing to offer a member for the job because of the tight standings in the house.Premier Brian Gallant’s Liberals are trying to hang onto power despite only winning 21 seats in last month’s election — one fewer than the Progressive Conservatives — and has no official coalition to secure victory on a confidence vote in the 49 seat legislature.On Tuesday, Gallant said he’s still hoping another party will offer a Speaker, to avoid putting the lieutenant-governor “in a difficult position.”“We are still very hopeful that another political party will put up a speaker so that we as a government can get the opportunity to be able to gain the confidence of the house,” he said.But so far the other parties have refused, and Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs repeated his position Tuesday.“The government has to put up a Speaker. It’s their obligation to do so. It’s not our obligation at this point in time,” Higgs said, adding he believes Gallant will relent.“I think that he will, at the end of the day, put a Speaker forward out of his own caucus if push comes to shove.”Gallant told reporters Tuesday he is pressing ahead and has invited the other leaders to meet with him to discuss what they need to see in a throne speech in order to support it.“Nobody wants an election right now. New Brunswickers have just gone to the polls. They want us to try something new. I think they want to see if we can make this new type of situation work,” Gallant said.The Greens and the Peoples’ Alliance parties each won three seats but the Liberals have not been able to reach a confidence and supply agreement with either one.There have been some suggestions that the Liberals and Tories should form an alliance, but Gallant said he doesn’t see that happening.“I do see some fundamental differences in the way Mr. Higgs and I would like to see this province move forward,” Gallant said.And Higgs said it doesn’t matter what Gallant puts in the throne speech — he won’t support it.“The throne speech is irrelevant. This is a non-confidence motion on the performance of this government over the last four years,” Higgs said.“I will not be supporting the throne speech and it doesn’t matter what it says.”Higgs said he expects his meeting with Gallant on Wednesday would be “interesting.”last_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Tagish First Nation in the Yukon has launched a program to build new homes for residents.As Marty O’Brien reports, it is also giving people there the chance to gain new skills.last_img

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