first_imgSoftware-defined networking (SDN) is still quite a new technology, but Project Calico is hoping to push forward a generational evolution. Today, the open-source project added support for Google’s Kubernetes container-management platform.Calico is the brainchild of Christopher Liljenstolpe. He is the director of solutions architecture at Metaswitch, and he said the goal is to build an easy-to-use SDN system targeted at developers, and for Metaswitch to offer premium services and software on top of Calico.(Related: Engine Yard container group launches Kubernetes packaging system) “The SDN solutions that have more of an enterprise heritage are relatively complex and bring a lot of baggage with them,” said Liljenstolpe. “A lot of that is built around the concepts of how we used to build enterprise networks. They provide layer 2 connectivity between small numbers of servers. In the scale-out, containerized world, that baggage makes building a simple scalable network anywhere from difficult to impossible.“For tens of thousands of servers, and hundreds of containers per server, and the fact those containers might only exist for seconds at a time; the churn and objects in-flight in these scale-out environments is a substantial orders of magnitude change. The legacy SDN plays are problematic.”To that end, Liljenstolpe looked at SDN from the perspective of a developer rather than from a network administrator. “Calico said we want a simple network infrastructure. People should not spend time troubleshooting their network,” he said.last_img read more

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first_imgFor security teams who are interested in launching old computer viruses or malware programs just for fun, there is now a collection available online that allows someone to experience these destructive viruses safely.This collection is called The Malware Museum, and it is a part of the Internet Archive, a non-profit that was founded to build an Internet library. This organization’s purpose is to offer permanent access for researchers, historians, scholars, people with disabilities, and the general public to historical collections in digital format. The Internet Archive includes text, audio, moving images and software, as well as archive pages in its collections.(Related: SourceForge has to remove Binkiland from its installer)The Malware Museum was created today by Mikko Hypponen, according to the museum’s Web page. It is a part of the MS-DOS section of Internet Archive Software Library. The purpose of this museum is to have a collection of malware programs, usually viruses, that were distributed in the 1980s and 1990s on home computers. Once they infected a system, they would sometimes show pictures or messages informing the user they had been infected. Through the use of emulation and removing destructive routines within the viruses, this collection allows for an experience of the viruses—safely.When a virus is selected, the Museum will bring up the metadata, load, and then run the virus. Some examples include LSD, Italian, SkyNet, and STUNNING.com, to name a few. Right now, there are 65 examples in the museum.last_img read more

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