first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate So sorry to hear of John Glenn’s death, the first American to orbit the earth. What an incredible feat to accomplish and to live to the ripe old age of 95! So sorry to read of the death also of Judge Scott Polodna in today’s Orlando Sentinel, at age 51. I met him and had a long conversation with him at the VFW Community Center several years back during one of the elections. I found him to be a genuinely nice gentleman. So sorry about both men’s passing, may they RIP. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply 1 COMMENT Mama Mia December 9, 2016 at 11:08 am You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear TAGSJohn Glenn Previous articleCommissioner Nelson Tours County JailNext articleApopka Christmas Parade hits middle age Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 From The New York TimesJohn Glenn, a freckle-faced son of Ohio who was hailed as a national hero and a symbol of the space age as the first American to orbit Earth, then became a national political figure for 24 years in the Senate, died on Thursday in Columbus, Ohio. He was 95.His death was announced on Twitter by Gov. John Kasich of Ohio.Mr. Glenn had recently been hospitalized at the James Cancer Center at Ohio State University in Columbus, though university officials said at the time that admission there did not necessarily mean he had cancer. He had heart-valve replacement surgery in 2014 and a stroke around that time.He had kept an office on the campus at the John Glenn School of Public Affairs, which he helped found, and had a home in Columbus.In just five hours on Feb. 20, 1962, Mr. Glenn joined a select roster of Americans whose feats have seized the country’s imagination and come to embody a moment in its history, figures like Lewis and Clark, the Wright brothers and Charles Lindbergh.To the America of the 1960s, Mr. Glenn was a clean-cut, good-natured, well-grounded Midwesterner, raised in Presbyterian rectitude, nurtured in patriotism and tested in war, who stepped forward to risk the unknown and succeeded spectacularly, lifting his country’s morale and restoring its self-confidence.It was an anxious nation that watched and listened that February morning, as Mr. Glenn, 40 years old, a Marine Corps test pilot and one of the seven original American astronauts, climbed into Friendship 7, the tiny Mercury capsule atop an Atlas rocket rising from the concrete flats of Cape Canaveral in Florida.The Cold War had long stoked fears of nuclear destruction, and the Russians seemed to be winning the contest with their unsettling ascent into outer space. Two Russians, Yuri A. Gagarin and Gherman S. Titov, had already orbited Earth the year before, overshadowing the feats of two Americans, Alan B. Shepard and Virgil I. Grissom, who had been launched in separate missions only to the fringes of space.What, people asked with rising urgency, had happened to the United States’ vaunted technology and can-do spirit?The answer came at 2:47 p.m. Eastern time, when after weeks of delays the rocket achieved liftoff. It was a short flight, just three orbits. But when Mr. Glenn was safely back, flashing the world a triumphant grin, doubts were replaced by a broad, new faith that the United States could indeed hold its own against the Soviet Union in the Cold War and might someday prevail.Read the entire article here. Please enter your name here Reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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first_imgTarget the bullies to beat stress epidemicOn 10 Feb 2004 in Personnel Today A leading employment counsellor is urging organisations to root outworkplace bullies in a bid to halt the spread of the UK’s stress epidemic. Colin Jackson, a counsellor with consultants HDA, blames bullying andharassment for a large proportion of the stress related absence. An exclusive survey recently carried out by Personnel Today in associationwith the Health & Safety Executive found that more than 1.5m days are lostto stress every year at a cost of more then £1.24bn to employers. Jackson, who has counselled traumatised employees for 11 years, believesbullying often goes unchecked and leads to staff missing work because ofstress. “We have to root out bullying now. It’s becoming the major issue,”he said. Bullying and harassment are the major causes of stress and the saddestthing is the victims often go on to become bullies themselves.” He said HR had a crucial role to play by assessing and training managers toimprove the way they interact with staff. “Often, people who have a bullying style don’t recognise they’re doingit – that’s why managers should get coaching to change the way theyoperate.” However, Jackson also claims the condition is misunderstood. “Stress is not a clinical illness. It’s something that causes otherillnesses such as depression, heart problems and substance addiction,” hesaid. “There’s been a massive increase in the number of people who believethey are suffering from stress and the more society talks about it the worse theproblem becomes. “The word stress is now at the very front of people’s minds. We saystress when we really mean pressure.” Levels of stress at work are rising though, and Jackson said employers mustimprove training so managers and staff can spot the warning signs. “I’m concerned about stress in the workplace because so much of it isavoidable. It’s about preventative measures. Managers need more training on howto deal with their own stress and that of staff,” he said. Essentially the problem occurs when an individual becomes so stressed thatworking is no longer possible. But because everybody needs a certain amount ofpressure to perform it’s a difficult balancing act for both bosses and staff. “People achieve their best under a degree of pressure, but if it getstoo much they can burn out,” said Jackson. “It happens most in the financial industry where people just reachbreaking point. [If they do] the business has failed the individual. It’s notalways possible to identify the signs, but good managers shouldn’t let it getto this point,” he added. Ironically, Jackson said, the major problem was at the other end of thescale, with more people becoming stressed because of too little pressure. The complete opposite to ‘burn out’ – where staff are engaged in boring,repetitive, jobs with too little pressure and no challenge – is just as badpsychologically. This idea of ‘rust out’ has been seen in the car manufacturing industry,where managers started to rotate duties and give workers more responsibility ina bid to reduce stress. Whatever the situation, Jackson said, good communication was crucial becauseuncertainty was a key factor in rising stress levels. The current GP sicknote system is critical to the problem and Jacksonwelcomed the recent investigation into the issue by Personnel Today. “The sicknote system is under pressure and it’s very difficult fordoctors, especially around workplace stress,” he said. Jackson said that since the 9/11 attacks in New York many employers havestarted to realise that they have a duty of care to workers’ mental andemotional health, although, he noted, this also makes business sense withpeople more likely to return to work if they have had counselling. “Peer support is important and if people stay off work they can be cutoff from their support network of friends and colleagues. “Often, managers are afraid to contact absent workers for fear ofharassing them and this can lead to staff sitting at home thinking nobody caresabout them.” Jackson said there was still a very ‘macho’ culture towards counsellinggenerally, but admitted that attitudes have started to change. For the future, Jackson predicts that all managers will have to possess somebasic counselling skills if they are to keep an organisation’s performance highand retain the best people. By Ross WighamWhat HR must do– Have a good stress policy that is clearly understood by allstaff  – Where possible, provide guidance for staff  – Initiate better training for managers to spot the signs ofstress early on    – Root out workplace bullies   Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. last_img read more

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