first_imgAll JCR motions at Corpus Christi will from now on have to have an identified proposer and seconder, as it was felt that anonymous motions were redundant and potentially harmful.At last week’s JCR meeting, a motion was proposed to make anonymous motions easier to submit.This drew clear opposition and an amendment was drawn up proposing the abolition of anonymous motions altogether. This amendment passed unopposed and a full proposal was written.The new proposal read that “anonymous motions were recently introduced into the JCR Constitution and they have had limited use”. Worries that anonymous motions could be undemocratic were the driving force behind the proposal. It was feared that an anonymous motion could allow someone who was not a member of the Corpus JCR body to submit any kind of motion, leaving members only to trust that it came from someone within the JCR. Amendments proposed to any such anonymous motions would also have to be relied upon to be friendly.Anonymous motions had been used only once since their introduction. It was felt that the potential harm they could cause outweighed their benefits.One of the obvious advantages of an anonymous JCR motion would be that, in the case of a sensitive issue, a motion could be submitted without the proposer’s identity being revealed.However, it was raised at the meeting that there were ways around this problem. As Corpus JCR Vice-President Harry Begg pointed out, “There are still other vehicles with which people are able to put forward motions, for example through our welfare team who could act as proxy proposers and seconders.” Begg also said that he hoped that anyone who felt passionate enough to propose a motion, would feel secure enough to publicly support it, if only by proxy telling Cherwell, “I would question if there could ever be a motion which would find support in the JCR where the person proposing was not comfortable appearing in public to support the spirit and content of that proposition.”Gayatri Parthasarathy and Abigail Burman, the proposer and seconder, were unavailable for comment.Although there were no objections, JCR member Nam Phuong Dinh had some misgivings about an outright ban, “I didn’t object to the motion at the meeting but I feel uneasy somehow. However, it seems like abolishing anonymous motions would get rid of more problems than it would create harm. Basically, I can’t think of why not.”last_img read more

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first_imgIn discussing the March release of Microsoft’s IDE, Visual Studio 2017, with director of program management for Visual Studio and .NET John Montgomery, he described software development today as “a team sport.” The tooling Microsoft and its partners offer for individual developers has been enhanced in this release, but Montgomery made a point to say that the IDE can do a lot for developers working in teams – especially those teams using modern agile techniques and DevOps workflows.Visual Studio 2017 embraces database DevOps with the ability to configure a CI/CD pipeline directly from within the IDE, Montgomery. Integrations with software created by Microsoft’s partners extend the robustness and ease of use of the offerings.Welcome to Build 2017. If you’re at the conference, take the time to speak with Microsoft’s partners. If you’re not here, we hope you enjoy this look at Microsoft’s developer ecosystem and the solutions that have come to market.Caphyon: Desktop Apps in The Windows StoreFlexera: Ensure Safe, Secure Software ProductsGrapeCity Builds on Mobile LeadershipLEADTOOLS: The Ultimate Imaging Development MultitoolOpsHub Enables Rich Collaboration Redgate Leads Database DevOpsSauce Labs: Automate Testing with ConfidenceSyncfusion Eases Mobile DevelopmentTasktop Enables Agile and DevOpsAnd more Microsoft Build Partners The way organizations build software has changed dramatically. The software development lifecycle is morphing from a series of independent steps – gather requirements, write code, test code, build, fix, build, and ultimately deploy to production — into a series of interconnected, continuous loops that bring all stakeholders in from beginning to end.Why has this happened? Agile development and DevOps have given organizations the ability to change software literally on the fly to take advantage of changing market conditions, or simply to stay a step ahead of the competition. New architectures such as containers and microservices give organizations a way to make changes to their business-critical applications without having to retest a large, monolithic application each time a change is made, making time-to-market shorter and leaving less room for error.Another huge shift has been the cloud and mobile application consumption. Organizations are taking advantage of better security, lower IT infrastructure costs and the proliferation of software services in the cloud to create secure, componentized applications. Meanwhile, the “consumerization” of apps has raised the bar for all development, as users demand great experiences from high-performance, data-driven applications.last_img read more

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