first_imgMichael Majerus has had it with creationists who leaped onto his 1998 book and used it for ammunition against Darwinism.  He had confessed that the simplified textbook story of the peppered moth was inaccurate, but he never meant to cast doubt on evolution.  Majerus (U. of Cambridge) is highlighted in a profile in the June 25 issue of Science1 by Fiona Proffitt.  He is determined to get to the truth about the peppered moths.  Proffitt writes, “After a severe drubbing, the famous example of the peppered moth is getting refurbished.”    Majerus, a researcher in sexual selection and the evolution of melanism (darkening), was among several biologists who began to question the validity of Bernard Kettlewell’s experiments on light and dark forms of Biston betularia that adorn most biology textbooks as “the most famous example of evolution in action.”  When he stated his reservations about the story, he set off a firestorm:Through his research, Majerus found himself embroiled in the scientific debate over the evolutionary forces behind melanism in the peppered moth.  Experiments by British lepidopterist Bernard Kettlewell in the 1950s claimed to show that bird predation, coupled with pollution, was responsible for a color shift in the moth population.  But problems with Kettlewell’s methodology led some scientists to doubt his conclusions.  Majerus was not the first to point out the flaws, but by doing so, he inadvertently set off a wave of anti-evolutionist attacks.  While acknowledging that Kettlewell made mistakes, Majerus believes Kettlewell was right in his conclusions and has taken it upon himself to prove it.Majerus is making thousands of moth observations with hundreds of thousands of lab-grown moth pupae to test the peppered moth story with better data and procedures.  To his credit, he is seeking to really develop a feel for the moths and let them tell their own story, rather than impose a preconceived conclusion on them.  Working three years on this project, he is going to “great lengths” to overcome the procedural errors made by Kettlewell:But doubts emerged over Kettlewell’s methodology in recent decades as researchers failed to replicate some of his results.  His predation experiments were chiefly criticized for their artificiality: He placed the moths on exposed parts of trees in broad daylight, when they don’t normally fly, rather than allowing them to settle naturally; he released them in large numbers, thereby inflating moth densities and possibly creating a magnet for predatory birds; and he used a mixture of lab-reared and wild-caught moths without checking to see whether they behaved the same way.  Majerus summarized these criticisms in a book on the evolution of melanism in 1998 and stated that the simplified textbook story of the peppered moth was inaccurate, while asserting that Kettlewell’s conclusions were qualitatively sound.  Majerus had no idea at the time what a furor his book would cause.That furor was intensified when Jerry Coyne wrote Nature in 5 November 1998 that “for the time being, we must discard Biston as a well-understood example of natural selection in action, although it is clearly a case of evolution.”2  Anti-evolutionists were quick to capitalize on this admission.  Judith Hooper wrote a “scathing” account in her book Of Moths and Men, and Jonathan Wells listed it as one of 10 discredited Icons of Evolution in his book.  Quoting Coyne and Majerus, creationists have been celebrating the downfall of this highly-touted example of Darwinism, even though they had long criticized its relevance to Darwinian theory.    His tedious work on peppered moth ecology has another purpose; ammunition.  Majerus is preparing to do battle.  His defense is to resuscitate the reputation of Kettlewell; his offense is to disarm those who use doubts about peppered moths to question evolution itself.  There is one group he considers particularly dangerous, and he is going to employ his widely-admired communication skill on a lecture circuit:It’s a talent Majerus hopes to put to good use in defending the reputation of Kettlewell and the peppered moth in a road show, which he aims to take around Britain–and possibly the United States–later this year.  He is motivated by growing concern over attacks on Kettlewell’s character, most notably writer Judith Hooper’s scathing account of the men behind the peppered moth story in her 2002 book Of Moths and Men: The Untold Story of Science and the Peppered Moth, which helped fuel an anti-evolutionist campaign to remove Biston from school textbooks.  “A lot of [the campaign] is pointed at the peppered moth as being the example that Darwinism is debunked,” says Majerus, who wants to make a public stand against teaching creationism and “intelligent design” in biology classes.  “To have people believe the biology of the planet is controlled by a Creator, I think that’s dangerous.”At this stage in his experiments, he has a hunch Kettlewell was right about bird predation being a driver of changes in peppered moth populations, but doesn’t feel he has enough data to call it proof.  Some of his colleagues think it’s too labor-intensive a task in light of other worthwhile pursuits.  Majerus himself doesn’t want to get stuck working on peppered moths all his life, but is determined to get a definite answer on the bird predation issue before taking his message on the road.1Fiona Proffitt, “Michael Majerus Profile: In Defense of Darwin and a Former Icon of Evolution,” Science, Vol 304, Issue 5679, 1894-1895, 25 June 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.304.5679.1894].2For a later opinion by Jerry Coyne, including a link to his 1998 article, see his review of Judith Hooper’s book mentioned in the 07/05/2002 headline.Darwinists, for your own good, give it up.  Peppered moths are not going to help you.  Yes, it was funny when Coyne described hearing the truth about Kettlewell’s experiments was like finding out that Santa Claus was really his dad.  Yes, it was damaging to learn that Kettlewell’s coworkers glued peppered moths to the trunks of trees for some of the famous photographs.  It was Far Side comic book material to find out this most famous example of evolution was based on flawed experiments.  All that aside, even if all the experiments had been done perfectly by scientific saints, and even if bird predation actually did shift the populations of moths according to the rise and fall of industrial soot on tree trunks, so what?  What does it prove?  Both varieties of moths already existed.  Both are members of one species, Biston betularia.  The only change was in relative numbers of pre-existing dark and light moths.  Kettlewell’s blunders are amusing in hindsight, but they have little to do with the real issue: Nothing evolved.  No new structures, organs or abilities emerged.  No genetic information was added.  Evolutionists need far better evidence than this to convince high schoolers that humans have bacteria ancestors.    More significant is what this episode reveals about the lack of solid evidence for Darwinian evolution.  For decades, evolutionists pointed to Kettlewell’s moths as one of the best, if not the best, examples of natural selection ever found.  One 60s high school biology text called it “one of the best examples of the impact on a species of a change in the environment,” and “a classic example of evolution in action” (Otto and Towle, Modern Biology 1969, pp. 193-194); “Industrial melanism is a demonstration of the importance of natural selection in the process of evolution.”  Despite the recent uproar over Kettlewell, the spiel goes on.  The same spin doctoring, and the same photos, can still be found in today’s high school textbooks, along with other debunked examples like Haeckel’s embryos (see 07/25/2003 and 10/30/2003 headlines).  Not only is it past time for Darwinists to clean up their act, it is incumbent upon them to find better evidence than shifting populations of existing subspecies if they expect anyone to become convinced that natural selection can produce giraffes from slime.    Advice to the Darwin Party: let the peppered myth have a solemn funeral, admit you made a big mistake, document the lessons learned, and move on to real empirical evidence.  Prove your theory, don’t expect people to just believe it.  Find an animal developing a new organ, like a wing or an eye.  Enumerate all the links in an actual chain of evolution from one organism lacking a complex structure to another having it, including the genetic and developmental pathways and the mutations involved.  Without resorting to just-so stories, provide an example of complex specified information or irreducible complexity arising purely from a purely naturalistic Darwinian mechanism.  Peppered moths are not up to the challenge.  While it is admirable that Majerus is attempting to accumulate definitive data on the little insects and their behaviors, and prove once and for all whether or not birds eat more of them on contrasting backgrounds, peppered moths are a dead issue to evolution.  Like the Sioux proverb advises, the best strategy when riding a dead horse is to dismount.    Now to an even more serious aspect of this story.  Majerus correctly connects the dots; he knows that the peppered moth tale symbolizes a battle over the soul of science.  Why do the Darwinists cling so tenaciously to any minuscule piece of evidence, no matter how inconsequential, that might be used to bolster the idea that natural selection can account for all of biology?  Why the initial confident rejoicing over Kettlewell, and the anguish over his downfall?  Listen to what Majerus said: “To have people believe the biology of the planet is controlled by a Creator, I think that’s dangerous.”    Phillip Johnson hit the nail on the head.  He has written repeatedly that the problem in the creation-evolution issue is not over evidence, but rather that evolutionists are committed to a materialist philosophy before the evidence has a chance to speak.  Science, to them, is no longer a search for the truth, a commitment to follow the evidence wherever it leads; it is a naturalistic philosophy that cannot stomach the thought of a Creator.  The issue is not whether this or that flimsy just-so story really supports Darwin’s theory or not.  It is that it must support it, because the alternative, that there really is a God who made the world and the things in it, is philosophically repugnant to them.  Their atheism demands a philosophy of science that can describe an unbroken chain of natural causes in a closed system.  To suggest otherwise is “dangerous” to them because it threatens their chosen world view.    Thus it is necessary to go to great lengths to prove Kettlewell right.  It is necessary to go on the road and oppose the dangerous creationists.  It is necessary to keep the peppered moths in the textbooks and prevent the students from hearing the problems with the moth myth.  It is necessary to “make a public stand against teaching creationism and ‘intelligent design’ in biology classes.”  The end justifies the means, because to have people believe that the biology of the planet is controlled by a Creator is “dangerous.”    Is it, really? It would seem that what is dangerous to science is dishonesty, cover-up, lack of scientific rigor, just-so storytelling, extrapolation, and obscurantism.  Is belief that the world is controlled by a Creator detrimental to scientific investigation?  Let’s ask Bacon, Kepler, Newton, Boyle, Maxwell, Pasteur, Carver, von Braun and a few other minor players in the history of science for their opinions.(Visited 53 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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first_imgAs evolutionary biologists examine diverse plants and animals, it seems they are never able to give a definitive answer as to how they got that way.  Their work merely begins or continues to search for clues.  Like mothers, their work is never done.  At least this provides them job security.Box jellyfish:  There are about 50 species of box jellyfish.  Some have highly toxic stings; some do not.  Some mate in groups without contact; others appear to pair off.  PhysOrg reported that a team of scientists from several universities has “unraveled the evolutionary relationships among the various species of box jellyfish, thereby providing insight into the evolution of their toxicity.”  While this knowledge will be useful to help predict which species are toxic to humans, and which antivenom strategies will be likely to work, it does not explain how box jellyfish evolved in the first place, nor how they developed “as many as 24 eyes, capable of sensing light and forming an image of their surroundings.”  Indeed, “Why they have complex eyes, how well they see, and what role vision plays in their mating and feeding behavior remain unknown.”Orchids:  There are about 25,000 species of orchids.  These are among the most diverse flowering plants in the world.  They have the most diverse pollinators; many have structures that are very specific to certain insects or birds.  PhysOrg posted an article about the “evolution of orchids” that actually spoke of diversification within orchids, not how they evolved from something else.  “Charles Darwin and many other scientists have long been puzzled by the evolution of orchids, the largest and most diverse family of flowering plants on Earth,” the article began.  “Now genetic sequencing is giving scientists insights into how these plants could evolve so quickly.”    Genetic studies show that there is a special petal controlled by different genes than the others.  “This genetic difference enables it to evolve differently to the remainder of the flower, producing structures such as the petal resembling the female bee” in the fly orchid.  This species tricks male bees to come and “mate” with the flower, which in turn gets pollinated by the bee.  Another suggestion in the article says “The rapid evolution of so many species of orchids and other flowering plants may also lie in the fact that flowering plants exhibit allopolyploidy or genetic redundancy, in which there is more than one gene to do a particular job.”  This explanation, however, does not address why other flowering plants don’t use allopolyploidy to the same extent as orchids, nor why genetic redundancy could not be viewed as a design strategy by a Creator.  It should be noted that staunch creationists admit a significant degree of adaptive natural selection within created kinds, while denying that orchids evolved from some other kind of plant.Moa please:  “The evolutionary history of New Zealand’s many extinct flightless moa has been re-written in the first comprehensive study of more than 260 sub-fossil specimens to combine all known genetic, anatomical, geological and ecological information about the unique bird lineage,” Science Daily announced.  Aside from the fact that prior knowledge about said evolution becomes pass� with this announcement, did it really explain how the giant birds came to be?  “The many species of moa are thought to have descended from a common ancestor of other large living flightless birds that evolved on separate southern landmasses when Gondwana broke up: the ostrich in Africa; the emu and cassowary in Australia; the rhea in South America; and New Zealand’s kiwi.  Another presumed relative was the extinct giant elephant bird in Madagascar.”  That simple thought, however, must pass through a “complex history” after the land masses separated.  “We were surprised to discover just how recently many of the moa species — and probably many of the iconic New Zealand animals and plants — evolved in the South Island after the uplift of the [Southern] Alps,” the researchers from the University of New South Wales said.Bats:  Science Daily printed a story about the “evolution of bat migration.”  This story had little to do with Darwinian evolution.  It was more about behaviors of existing populations looking for food.  Even so, it involved a convoluted explanation about how behaviors evolved multiple times: “The researchers revealed that the migratory behavior over long and short distance evolved repeatedly and for the most part independently within the family of vespertilionid bats.”  Speculation rules again: “The evolution as well as the loss of the migratory behavior is probably based on the fast evolutionary adaptation that is caused by climate changes or changes in the social life of the bat.”  This composite explanation does not distinguish bats from other species that lived during the same climate changes, and fails to establish a natural law that causes evolution.  Some might dispute the claim that climate causes anything in evolution.  It was also not explained whether changes in the social life of any population are causes or effects of evolution.Cold-blooded goat?  PhysOrg and National Geographic celebrated the discovery of an extinct island goat that might have “lived like a reptile” – i.e., exhibited the ability to reduce its body temperature depending on the food supply.  “A prehistoric goat survived for millennia on a resource-poor island by living like a reptile—changing its growth rate and metabolism to match the available food supply, according to a new study of the animal’s bones.”  Of course, the goat had fur and all the mammalian characteristics – not scales.  It’s not clear what can be adduced from bones alone, or what this claim has to do with evolution, unless it is an illustration of devolution to a more primitive life history.  The diminutive goats on the island Majorca, near Spain, apparently had no natural enemies and a limited food supply.  They survived for a long time before humans hunted them to extinction about 3,000 years ago, the articles said.Flashing sabers:  Big sharp teeth apparently don’t translate into ferociousness.  Live Science said that “Study Paints Sabertooths as Relative Pussycats.”  Compared to the extinct America lion, the saber-tooth tiger Smilodon fatalis might have been mild-mannered.  This was based purely on sexual dimorphism, though.  “After generations of male-male competition, the males of some species evolve to be much larger than their mates,” the article stated.  Since saber-tooth cats have less sexual dimorphism, the males of the species may not have had the aggressiveness suggested by the dimorphism in American lions.  Even so, this says little about the origin of these animals.  It accommodates the limited variation within created kinds that a creationist would accept.Hobbitses:  The latest salvo in the controversy over how to interpret Homo florensiensis, the small-skeleton human remains found in Indonesia a few years ago, comes from Stony Brook University Medical Center.  PhysOrg reported that researchers there decided it represents a new human species – not a population of modern humans with a brain disorder called microcephaly.  Their explanation, however, revolves around different notions about what evolution would do.  Were these little people modern humans that became dwarfed while stuck on an island?  “It is difficult to believe an evolutionary change would lead to less economical movement,” said Dr. William Jungers of Stony Brook.  “It makes little sense that this species re-evolved shorter thighs and legs because long hind limbs improve bipedal walking.  We suspect that these are primitive retentions instead.”  What makes sense to one researcher, however, or what looks primitive, may be disputed by others.    Perhaps the Darwinians should tackle the more difficult question raised by another article on PhysOrg about brains.  Neuroscientists at UCLA found that the human brain has a remarkable ability to reorganize itself and compensate for disabilities.  The blind, for instance, learn to “see” things from tiny changes in heat, sound, touch and other cues.  The neuroscientists found that the frontal lobes and memory centers in blind subjects become enlarged, “perhaps offering an anatomical foundation for some of blind individuals’ enhanced skills.” See also the 11/17/2009 entry about brain size.Cannibal evolution:  Cannibals are apparently more fit than the rest of us.  They have a gene mutation that protects them from the ravages of a brain disease that would result from eating their fellow humans’ gray matter.  New Scientist called this “the most clear-cut evidence yet of human evolution in action.”  Simon Mead the University College London is all excited.  “I hope it will become a textbook example of how evolution happens,” he said.  “It’s a striking and timely example, given the 150th anniversary of the publication of Darwin’s Origin of Species.”  It wasn’t clear if Mead was advocating cannibalism for health and fitness, but it left a question begging of whether a single point mutation in one gene that breaks kuru, a brain disease, is really evolution.  Presumably the survivors are the only ones left from a population that died from the ravages of the disease.  More apt might be the question of why the people of Papua New Guinea ever were led to believe that engaging in a risky behavior was a worthwhile way of showing respect for the dead.Darwin got a little more personal notoriety – as if he even needed any more – by PhysOrg.  It wasn’t for his theory of evolution, though.  Some museum curators are glad he collected specimens of mockingbirds on the Galapagos, because it may enable them to reintroduce an endangered species back to the islands.  The observations sound downright un-Darwinian: “They discovered that the populations living on the small satellite islands of Champion and Gardner-by-Floreana do not have long independent evolutionary histories.,” the article ended.  “In fact, they split from each other perhaps as recently as Darwin’s visit and probably as the result of the extinction of the Floreana population – a bridge between the two.”We keep showing you ad nauseum how the Darwinians play their game (see “How not to work a puzzle” in the 05/01/2008 commentary).  Their explanations are not conclusions emerging naturally from the observations; they are beliefs imposed on the observations by a prior chosen world view.  Watch for the tricks of the trade: extrapolating microevolution (which is not disputed even by Biblical creationists) to molecules-to-man Darwinian evolution, tossing in ample fudge-words (e.g., this suggests that such-and-such might, could have, may have, or probably evolved); promissory notes (this promises to shed light on evolution), composite cop-outs (such-and-such evolved because of climate, or a social change, or whatever), assuming evolution instead of demonstrating it, and failing to deal with the primary question of the origin of genetic information for complex, functional capabilities.    Since critics of their game have been expelled in advance, the Darwinian storytelling society has become a corrupt, incestuous tradition.  They do not feel threatened because of their enormous power base inside academia, protected by media and legal checkpoints.  If you ever make it past the guards into their protected enclaves, ask them to explain to you “the evolution of the tendency of evolutionary biologists to engage in just-so storytelling” and see if the question even registers on their intellectual radar screens.  Most likely you will get a blank stare for a few seconds, followed by a personal attack, like What are you, some kind of creationist?  We’re talking about science here!  Guards: seize this fundamentalist!(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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first_img18 February 2008South Africa’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) has entered into a partnership with commercial aircraft maker Airbus to conduct research into new technologies and processes in the area of computational fluid dynamics (CFD).The CSIR said in a statement last week that the one-year agreement, with an approximate value of around R1.5-million, aims to research and define technologies in numerical modelling that can make an important contribution to the design of clean and efficient next-generation jetliners.The project forms part of Airbus’s research and technology partnership with South Africa, which was launched in 2006. Through the project, the CSIR is now a member of Airbus’s global research and technology network.The project will see South African aeronautics engineers playing a vital role in the development of mathematical software intended to aid Airbus in the design and manufacture of next-generation aircraft aimed at providing a more eco-efficient means of travel.Airbus research and technology senior vice president Axel Krein said the project demonstrated his company’s recognition of both the CSIR and South Africa’s capabilities in hi-tech engineering science and technology, adding that harnessing knowledge from around the world was the only answer to managing air transport growth while reducing its impact on the environment.“Computational mechanics is an extremely exciting field where the sky is no longer the limit, but the next frontier,” Krein said. “The CSIR believes it has a valuable contribution to make in furthering understanding and developing solutions in this science.”CSIR computational aerodynamics principal researcher Dr Arnaud Malan said it was the first time that Airbus was making use of the skills of his institution’s researchers, and was confident that it would be a mutually beneficial partnership.“This is a rapidly growing engineering field and is highly competitive,” Malan said. “In a nutshell, our research in this area of computational mechanics will help to enable the design of an aircraft in cyberspace.”During the course of the research project, CSIR researchers will make use of the Centre for High Performance Computing (CHPC) – a Department of Science and Technology initiative that is managed by the CSIR’s Meraka Institute in cooperation with the University of Cape Town.SAinfo reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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first_img19 May 2010With the kick-off of the 2010 Fifa World Cup™ fast approaching, South Africa is on track to issue free visas to ticket holders and to process the hundreds of thousands of visitors expected in the country next month.Addressing a committee on the country’s state of readiness for the World Cup in Cape Town this week, Home Affairs Minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma said Fifa employees were being awarded visas, and that the department had already issued 3 500 World Cup-related work permits.She said free event visas would be awarded to those with World Cup tickets, while dedicated lanes would be set aside for those coming to the tournament. Priority treatment would also be given to Fifa delegations and teams.Branded lanes, volunteersSpecific branded lanes were in the process of being set up at Durban’s King Shaka in Durban, Cape Town International Airport and OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg.The department was also training volunteers to work at airports in assisting arriving visitors.While a new movement control technology system which was launched at OR Tambo International was being rolled out across the country, the department had also placed airline liaison officers at various airports for clearing passengers and would enable police to screen visitors before they arrived.“It means the bulk of the passengers we would know that they aren’t high risk by the time they arrive at our airports and therefore would be cleared much faster,” said Dlamini-Zuma, who added that the system was piloted, together with Egypt, at last year’s Confederations Cup.International hubsInternational airports in countries including Kenya, the Netherlands, Hong Kong, Germany, India and Dubai had been identified as hubs where the majority of passengers would be passing through on their way to the World Cup.Discussions had been concluded with Kenya, Nigeria, the Netherlands, India, Hong Kong, Germany and the UK and negotiations were under way with Dubai, she said.Dlamini-Zuma said the department was working with South African Airways (SAA) to screen passengers before they came to South Africa, but added that this process had been delayed by the volcanic ash cloud over Europe in recent weeks.She said this would give SAA an advantage in that it would be quicker to clear immigration if you were flying the national airline.Land border pointsAt land border points, joint clearances were being set up, so that those passing through border checkpoints will only have to wait in a single queue, rather than going through one queue on either side of the border, she said.She said one such point had already been set up at the Lebombo border post at the Mozambique-South Africa.Other co-location points would be set up at the Zimbabwe border at Beit Bridge, Maseru and Ficksburg at the Lesotho border, Oshoek at the Swaziland border and at Kopfontein at the Botswana border.The department was also looking at introducing a transit visa for those that resided in neighbouring countries that passed through South Africa.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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first_imgSummaryReviewer Nathalie DuboisReview Date2018-03-22 13:45:04Reviewed Item Black Fashion Turban Funky Headwrap, Ideal For Hair Loss, Chemo Or Fashion UseRating 4.0 / 5  stars, based on  17  reviews Good quality fantastic service arive erly top rait sella with top raight service n good products n i wood recomend. Good quality fantastic service arive erly top rait sella with top raight service n good products n i wood recomend. Not very fashionable but does the job. Very useful item with a number of possible uses Fits perfectly and very useful especially in this weather, arrived quickly true to description. Have to many hats now or would purchase in different colours. Very useful item with a number of possible uses. Very useful item with a number of possible uses. Handy when applying make-up or when preparing food. Very comfortable to wear and neither too tight nor too large. Features of Black Fashion Turban Funky Headwrap, Ideal For Hair Loss, Chemo Or Fashion UseStretchy To Fit All Head SizesDispatched And Sold In UKLoads Of Colours To Choose From (see other listings)Comfortable FitMade from 100% Polyester Easy to slip on if door bell goes or i need to pop out into the garden. Fits perfectly and very useful especially in this weather, arrived quickly true to description. Have to many hats now or would purchase in different colours. Not very fashionable but does the job. Great bargain and my girlfriend was very happy with the product. Good quality and would recommend this product. Great bargain and my girlfriend was very happy with the product. Good quality and would recommend this product. Easy to slip on if door bell goes or i need to pop out into the garden. Very useful item with a number of possible uses. Very useful item with a number of possible uses. Handy when applying make-up or when preparing food. Very comfortable to wear and neither too tight nor too large. center_img Posted on March 22, 2018Author Nathalie DuboisCategories Hair Care ProductsTags Beautifeyelast_img read more

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first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Pellegrini adamant West Ham will not sell Arnautovic or Carrollby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAndy Carroll and Marko Arnautovic will not leave West Ham United this month, manager Manuel Pellegrini has confirmed.Both strikers have been linked with moves away from the London Stadium.”Andy will still be here with us, he is an important player for us,” Pellegrini said ahead of Saturday’s FA Cup third-round tie with Birmingham.”He is just coming back from a long, long injury, and the way he is taking advantage of his minutes he will return to the player that we all know.”I am also sure Marko Arnautovic will stay here with us. Good players always have offers but that is different to rumours.” last_img read more

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first_img Details of the master plan for the Greater Bernard Lodge Development in St. Catherine are being finalised.Urban Planner, Martin Addington, said establishment of the water and sewerage infrastructure and the allocation of remaining blocks of land to interested private developers, are among the areas being firmed up.“A competitive tendering process will begin for the land development in short order,” he told JIS News during a media sensitisation and tour of the areas to be developed under the project on February 22.Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, in March 2018, announced that Cabinet has approved the Bernard Lodge Land Use Master Plan for the development of a new town in the area once dedicated to sugar-cane farming and sugar manufacture.The development includes the provision of shared infrastructure services, residential housing, commercial offices and light industrial operations.The Greater Bernard Lodge Development is situated on roughly 4,677 acres of land and falls between the Spanish Town and Portmore urban areas.Mr. Addington noted that the project area is bordered by the Lakes Pen main road to the north, Portmore Municipal Boulevard and Caribbean Estates to the south, and Phoenix Park and the Dunbeholden Road to the west.Approximately 2,338.5 acres will be used for the construction of 17,000 houses, and establishment of light manufacturing plants and agro-processing facilities. Social services such as schools and health facilities are included.The remaining 2,338.5 acres of land space will be placed into agriculture with existing irrigation facilities relocated and established in this zone. Markets will also be set up.In an interview with JIS News during the tour, Chairman of the Enterprise Team formed to lead the Bernard Lodge master plan, Joseph Shoucair, said the overarching aim is to have an integrated development with “farming, manufacturing, light industry and housing”.“It will not only provide accommodations but it will move away from the dormitory concept, which exists in Portmore where everybody sleeps there but works in Kingston and Spanish Town. So you would have people who live here (in the Bernard Lodge Development) but also work there,” he noted.Mr. Shoucair informed that there are 122 leases for land in the area, and people occupying those parcels will be compensated and some relocated.“We are putting them (farmers with agriculture leases) in an area that will be dedicated to farming. Those people who are squatting will be compensated too for growing crops or relocated,” he said.The touring party, led by Mr. Shoucair, visited lands located at the now defunct Bernard Lodge sugar factory as well as those lands located along the Lakes Pen main road. Story Highlights Details of the master plan for the Greater Bernard Lodge Development in St. Catherine are being finalised. “A competitive tendering process will begin for the land development in short order,” he told JIS News during a media sensitisation and tour of the areas to be developed under the project on February 22. Urban Planner, Martin Addington, said establishment of the water and sewerage infrastructure and the allocation of remaining blocks of land to interested private developers, are among the areas being firmed up. last_img read more

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first_imgOTTAWA – Canada’s push to get climate change action included in a revamped North American Free Trade Agreement is turning into a heated domestic dispute just as it makes its debut at the official negotiating table.The NAFTA schedule obtained by The Canadian Press showed the environment was on the schedule for seven hours of NAFTA talks in Mexico City Monday, and another seven hours on Tuesday.It could be one of the more contentious chapters, as significant differences of opinion about the environment exist between the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Donald Trump.Those differences largely exist domestically as well and were being played out in social media over the Labour Day weekend.Environment Minister Catherine McKenna launched an angry missive at Conservative Foreign Affairs critic Erin O’Toole on Sunday, for suggesting the environment was a mere “trinket” better left to the sidelines in order to protect Canada’s economic well-being.She was responding to comments O’Toole made to The Canadian Press in which he accused the government’s push for environmental protections, Indigenous rights and gender equality as “virtue signalling” as part of the image-building machinery around Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.“And so done with ridiculous language from #CPC like ‘virtue signalling,’” McKenna tweeted. “We will continue to stand up for Canadian values at home & abroad.”She wrote a lengthy response on Facebook noting it was his party under Prime Minister Brian Mulroney that first included the environment in a Canadian trade deal with NAFTA’s parallel environment agreement.“We are currently witnessing the largest forest fire in British Columbia’s history, the Atlantic Ocean recording record temperatures, and the second flood of the century in 12 months in Windsor,” McKenna wrote. “And the conservatives are still saying that the environment and the economy can be separated! Climate change is real and environmental protection is essential. It is time for the conservatives to understand the message.”A spokeswoman for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said McKenna’s Facebook post was the official government response to O’Toole.At the NAFTA table, Canada and the U.S. both want the environment agreement to be pulled into the main NAFTA papers rather than existing as a side deal. They also both want provisions to prevent NAFTA countries from loosening environmental restrictions as a way to attract investment.Where they differ however is on climate change. While the U.S. stated one of its NAFTA goals was to include a requirement for countries to live up to their obligations under multilateral agreements, the U.S. is in the process of withdrawing from the biggest of those agreements on climate change – the Paris accord.Trump has previously referred to climate change as a “hoax” and has started undoing policies of the former administration of Barack Obama, such as fossil fuel production restrictions, which he says have hurt the U.S. economy.Canada would like a new NAFTA to specifically reference climate change and prioritize measures to help combat it.University of Lethbridge politics professor Chris Kukucha thinks that hill will prove too steep for Canada to climb and will have to be abandoned.“They will try, they’ll bring it up because that’s the government’s mandate,” he said. “At the end of the day I think the people sitting at the table know that’s a non-starter, it’s not going to be there,” he said. “Not with that administration in the United States.”Kukucha said the domestic political battles over the environment are unlikely to have any impact at the negotiating table, although he said the U.S. could use it as a wedge issue against Canada on areas Canada doesn’t want to give up such as supply management.That the environment is a Canadian priority for NAFTA was underscored last week when McKenna created a NAFTA advisory council on the environment made up of two former premiers, a former provincial finance minister and representatives from environment and industry associations.-follow @mrabson on Twitter.last_img read more

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first_imgLOS ANGELES — Movie sequels are having their own Thanksgiving feast at the box office.Studios on Sunday said the “Wreck-It Ralph” sequel “Ralph Breaks the Internet” has earned an estimated $55.7 million over the three-day weekend and $84.5 million since its Wednesday opening to top the North American charts.The Rocky spinoff “Creed II” has placed second with $35.3 million from the weekend and $55.8 million since Wednesday, far surpassing the first film’s Thanksgiving debut in 2015.There was little left at the table for the latest version of “Robin Hood,” starring Taron Egerton. The poorly reviewed pic grossed only $14.2 million in its first five days in theatres against a reported production budget of nearly $100 million.Lindsey Bahr, The Associated Presslast_img

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first_imgDAWSON CREEK, B.C. — The Dawson Creek chapter of 100 Women Who Care, the first chapter of the 100 Women movement to get set up in the Peace Region, will be hosting their fourth meeting this Thursday.The Dawson Creek chapter was co-founded by Annette Jalbert and Chante Patterson-Elden nearly two years ago. The group gets 100 or women to each give $100 to a pool, which is then donated to one of three charities that make a presentation during the group’s bi-annual meetings. On December 1st, 2016 the group hosted its Inaugural Gala which saw 186 women participate. The South Peace Seniors Access Service Society was the group’s first recipient, and received a donation of over $18,600. In April 2017, 216 members participated in the group’s second Gala, where The Ark – Dawson Creek Youth Centre Society received $21,600. The Network Ministries received $16,000 at the group’s third meeting last November. Organizers say that at this week’s meeting, the group will also be starting up registration for the Dawson Creek chapter of 100 Kids/Teens Who Care. The group will be holding registration this Thursday, with their inaugural meeting set to take place this fall.The Dawson Creek chapter of 100 Women Who Care will be meeting at the George Dawson Inn this Thursday, April 26th starting at 6:00 p.m.For more information, email the group at [email protected] or call Annette at 250-784-4321 or Chante at 250-219-4403. You can also join their Facebook page.last_img read more

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