first_img December 11, 2017 – Updated on December 12, 2017 RSF safety training and advocacy visit to Afghanistan Organisation RSF asks International Criminal Court to investigate murders of journalists in Afghanistan News March 11, 2021 Find out more RSF_en For the first time, RSF held seminars in Mazar-i-Sharif (in the northern province of Balkh), Herat (in the western province of Herat) and Charikar (in the central province of Parwan). And for the first, RSF conducted a seminar in Kabul specifically for women reporters in conflict zones at the request of the Centre for the Protection of Afghan Women Journalists (CPAWJ).In all, 65 journalists (including 26 women) from 60 independent Afghan media outlets attended the seminars, which were based on the new Pashto and Persian-language versions of the Safety Guide for Journalists, published by RSF in partnership with UNESCO. Some of the journalists came from nearby provinces, above all Kapisa, Panjshir, Kunduz, Farah, Samangan, Jowzjan, Ghor and Badghis.At these seminars, RSF met journalists who are not only threatened by armed non-state groups but are also harassed by local politicians including provincial governors.”Self-censorship is the rule in order to survive,” said a journalist from Balkh province who asked not to be identified. “You can talk about a lot of things but not corruption. For example, it’s forbidden to talk about the seizure of state land or property by governors or their associates or allies. And ‘forbidden’ means there’s a danger of being killed!”The governors of Balkh and Herat provinces did not respond to requests from the RSF delegation for meetings to discuss journalists’ safety.Fewer and fewer women journalistsRSF and its local partner, the Centre for the Protection of Afghan Women Journalists, held a press conference in Kabul on 20 November on the situation of women journalists. The CPAWJ presented the findings of a survey of women journalists at 74 leading national and local media outlets (29 TV channels, 35 radio stations, four news agencies and six newspapers) in 22 provinces, and at four NGOs that defend media freedom and journalists.The survey found that altogether these media outlets employ a total of 1,037 women, including 474 women professional journalists, and it confirmed that the security situation in Afghanistan is having a direct impact on the presence of women in the media.The security challenge and the importance of women in the media were central themes of the opening addresses that Sima Samar, the head of the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission, and Mohammad Rasool Bawari, the acting information and culture minister, delivered at the press conference.CPWAJ director Farida Nekzad and Reza Moini, the head of RSF’s Iran/Afghanistan desk, emphasized the danger that women could disappear altogether from the media sector. To prevent this, they urged the government and parliament to provide women journalists with more protection, especially in the remoter provinces.The CPWAJ and RSF also called for amendments to the law banning violence against women, so that it gives them better protection against psychological and sexual harassment in the workplace, and for a newsroom code that protects women journalists.Violence, chief foe of women journalistsMany women journalists have abandoned their jobs because of growing threats and the climate of violence against women. Six women media workers have been killed since the start of 2016.The situation of women journalists in the provinces of Kunduz and Nangarhar – which have seen violent clashes between the Taliban, Islamic State and the Afghan armed forces for the past two years – is indicative. Kunduz had at least 100 women journalists and media workers in 2016 but, after the Taliban attacks there, the number has plummeted.The situation is similar in Nangarhar. “Forty women journalists used to work in the Nangarhar region but now there are just a handful and they only work in the newsrooms,” local journalist Rahmatullah Ziarmal said. “As well as the war, the violence, the Taliban and Islamic State, local politicians and organized crime are to blame for this.”The CPAWJ survey also establishes a link between the number woman journalists and coverage of women: the fewer the women working for newspapers, the fewer the articles about women.Government efforts to protect journalistsIn response to the threats, the Afghan authorities and media representatives have jointly launched a system of coordinating committees for the safety of journalists and media. This initiative has been a real success and could be an example for many other countries.Created in September 2016, the committees have already had a positive impact, helping to reduce threats against the media and to combat impunity. Vice-President Sarwar Danish chairs the top committee, which consists of senior government and judicial officials and representatives of journalists’ and media associations. Sub-committees monitor individual threats and abuses against journalists and media, the trends and the success of efforts to combat them.”In the past year, this entity has successfully dealt with around ten cases involving threats against journalists and media,” said Hujatollah Mujadadi, one of the representatives of the Federation of Afghan Media Organizations and Journalists who are members of the top committee. “In several of these cases, senior governmental or military officials were asked to apologize to media outlets or journalists or were even punished by their superiors. In the event of a disagreement, the committee transfers the case to the prosecutor’s office, which can initiate judicial proceedings.”The local committees – in which the security forces, including the National Directorate of Security (NDS), are represented – meet once a month in the different provinces to seek solutions to the security problems that some journalists face.At a meeting with Vice-President Danish on 22 November, RSF praised the committee’s achievements while pointing out the need to provide women journalists with more protection. Danish reiterated his commitment to supporting RSF initiatives aimed at protecting journalists.Afghanistan is ranked 120th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index.. In response to an increase in armed attacks by the Taliban and Islamic State and a decline in the security situation, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) made a training and advocacy visit to Afghanistan from 11 to 22 November that was aimed at improving the safety of Afghan journalists, with a special emphasis on women journalists. News Afghanistan : “No just and lasting peace in Afghanistan without guarantees for press freedom” News Follow the news on Afghanistan Receive email alerts AfghanistanAsia – Pacific Activities in the fieldProtecting journalists WomenArmed conflictsViolenceJihadism June 2, 2021 Find out more News AfghanistanAsia – Pacific Activities in the fieldProtecting journalists WomenArmed conflictsViolenceJihadism Help by sharing this information Situation getting more critical for Afghan women journalists, report says to go further May 3, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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first_imgOxford remains in second place in the Guardian’s 2019 university league tables as Cambridge clinched the top spot.It is the third consecutive year that Oxford, Cambridge, and St Andrews have occupied the top three positions in the table.The yearly ranking system scores colleges out of 100 based on courses, satisfaction, funding per student, teaching quality, and student-staff ratio among other measures.Oxford’s overall score out of 100 fell by 0.7 from 98.1 in 2018.The list also ranks colleges for their performance in subjects. Oxford rose to the top spot in Anthropology this year, beating out London School of Economics from last year.The University remained the best in the country for Business, Chemistry, Music, Geography, and Maths, among others.King’s College London suffered the biggest drop, falling 19 places to 58 from 39 last year.Trinity St David’s and Westminster were the biggest risers, as both climbed 27 places. Trinity St David’s shot up from 112 to 85, while Westminster rose from 108 to 81.last_img read more

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first_img At 7 a.m. on September 10, Camp Blanding, Florida witnessed the final phase of military exercises under the seventh edition of operation Partnership of the Americas (POA). This year, the U.S. Marine Corps hosted their counterparts from Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay. The 13-day training exercise, the first phase of which began on September 2 is run by the U.S. Marine Forces, South (MARFORSOUTH) – a component of U.S. Southern Command – as part of the broader military exercise known as UNITAS. Latin for “unity,” this is a combined South America and U.S. Military-sponsored exercise series which has been taking place annually for the last 57 years. The amphibious component of POA is taking place at Naval Station Mayport, Florida, while the rehearsals and land personnel training are being developed in Camp Blanding. Both places are close to Jacksonville, Florida. “Our objective each year is to bring together all the Marine Corps of the Western Hemisphere in order to work together on tactical operations on air, land and sea to develop missions for the support of peace, sovereignty defense, and humanitarian assistance in all of the U.S. Southern Command’s partner nations,” Colonel Agustín Bolanio, director of POA 2012, told Diálogo. Even when the United States serves as the host country, POA is clearly a multi-national effort. This is obvious by watching the different colors of each of the uniforms and emblems of the participating countries, as well as by the languages in which the trainings are developed. The Partner Nations all come together with common interests to establish and maintain stability in the region, and send specialized personnel in predetermined arenas. For example, some are experts in aquatic operations, while others specialize in rescue missions and yet others in humanitarian aid. “But at the end, we all come to learn from one another. We want to learn from them just as much as they want to learn from us,” said Col. Bolanio. There are many outstanding events on the training calendar. Some of the most notable ones include the military operations on urban terrain, most closely related to amphibious vehicles, and the wide array of exercises with real fire. These rehearsals offer the Marines of every nation an opportunity to analyze real situations that they face daily in their home countries. But in addition, – as expressed to Diálogo by some of the participants – it gives them the capability to exchange knowledge, tactics and skills while giving them the chance to also build strong bonds of friendship, cooperation and mutual understanding, which will result in peace and progress across the region. By Dialogo September 12, 2012last_img read more

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first_imgThe 800m girlsHalimah Nakaayi and Winnie Nanyondo make their Olympic debuts in the 800m heats today. Improving their personal best times will be their target.Thursday August 18 Men’s 1500m semifinal – Ronald MusagalaWomen 800m semifinalFriday August 19 Women’s 5000m finalSaturday August 20 Men’s 1500m final 3.00am (Sunday)Men’s 5000m final 3.30am (Sunday)Joshua Kiprui CheptegeiSunday August 21 Men’s Marathon final 3.30pmSolomon Mutai, Jackson Kiprop and Stephen KiprotichShare on: WhatsApp Cheptegei back in the 5000mIt has been a disappointing few days in Rio for Uganda so far, but the search for glory at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad continues today. Uganda’s best performance so far has come from 19-year-old Joshua Cheptegei who finished 6th in the 10,000m final won by Britain’s Mo Farah. He gets another shot when he runs his favourite race, the 5000m today.Cheptegei should easily make the final, but will hope for a slow semifinal so that he can reserve some energy for the final push. Together with 15-year-old Jacob Kiplimo, they go in heat 1 that also includes Mo Farah. Phillip Kipyeko runs in the 2nd heat.First five in each heat and the next 5 fastest from both heat, qualify. INTO FINAL: France’s Yoann Kowal (L), USA’s Donald Cabral (C) and Uganda’s Jacob Araptany (2ndR) compete in the Men’s 3000m Steeplechase Round 1 during the athletics event at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Stadium in Rio de Janeiro on August 15, 2016. PHOTO AFP TodayMen’s 5000m round 1 – 4.05pmJacob Kiplimo, Phillip Kipyeko and Joshua Kiprui CheptegeiWomen’s 800m round 1 – 4.55pmHalimah Nakaayi and Winnie NanyondoMen’s Steeplechase final –  5.55pmJacob Araptany If Jacob Araptany did not burn himself out by running a season best 8:21.53 in the heats on Monday, he will join a group of athletes out to deny Kenya a 1-2-3 finish in the final today.For 36 years, the steeplechase gold has been won by a Kenyan, and all indications are that will not change today. The stats indicate that the best everyone else can do is deny the Kenyans the pride of sweeping all medals like they did in 1992 and 2004.France’s Mahiedine Mekhissi, who won his fourth European title last month, US champion Evan Jager, who booked his spot in the final with a win in his heat, and Uganda’s Araptany who came second in his heat, will attempt to spoil the Kenyan party.They will have to run close to this year’s season best time of 8:00.12 to do this. Araptany’s best in the race is 8:14.48 set in 2012.Going by pedigree and best times set this year, including 8:00.12 by youngster Conseslus Kipruto, the race will be won by either him, reigning Olympic champion Ezekiel Kemboi or  2008 Olympic champion Brimin Kipruto.last_img read more

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