first_img MyanmarAsia – Pacific News RSF_en May 31, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts News US journalist held in Yangon prison notorious for torture Help by sharing this information MyanmarAsia – Pacific May 12, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Myanmarcenter_img March 19, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Regime bans magazine articles by historian RSF asks Germany to let Myanmar journalist Mratt Kyaw Thu apply for asylum Thai premier, UN rapporteurs asked to prevent journalists being returned to Myanmar News to go further May 26, 2021 Find out more News 03.20.2003The Censorship Office banned publication in early March of articles by Burmese historian Than Tun. The move is thought to be linked with his remarks on the US-based Radio Free Asia about the recent discovery of three white elephants in western Burma. The military regime said they were a very good sign of the country’s future prosperity, but Than Tun said there was no connection between them and national development. Burma is in deep economic crisis.The magazine Irrawaddy, published in Thailand, said the move could be due to articles by the historian in the monthly Klaya about how Burma was governed in the 18th century. Censors may have spotted references to how the country was currently being run by the army, it said.————————————-Military junta bans reporting on banking crisis03.18.2003A month-old news blackout imposed by the military junta on a crisis in Burma’s banking system is flagrant violation of the right of the Burmese people to be freely informed, Reporters Without Borders (Reporters sans frontières) and the Burma Media Association (BMA) said today. Newspaper editors have been threatened with reprisals if they violate the ban.”The Burmese government, one of the few in the world to impose prior censorship on privately-owned publications, has yet again shown its inability to accept the free flow of economic news,” the two organisations said, reiterating their call for an immediate end to news censorship.The Literary Works Scrutinising Committee (LWSC), the interior ministry offshoot responsible for censorship, summoned the editors of Burma’s main privately-owned newspapers to a meeting on 19 February at which they were threatened with reprisals if they published any reports about the serious banking crisis. This news blackout would prevent the crisis from being exacerbated and put a stop to rumours, officials said.Journalists based in Rangoon told Reporters Without Borders and the BMA in the past few days that it was still impossible for them to report on the banking crisis. “I wrote three stories on the subject and they were all rejected. It’s very frustrating,” one said. No report has appeared on the crisis, not even in the privately-owned English-language Myanmar Times.The banking crisis was set off by the government’s decision to close a dozen savings and loan institutions that were offering better interest rates than the banks. On 20 February, the central bank limited transfers and cash withdrawals from the country’s 20 banks. Hundreds of Burmese line up outside banks every day, especially the Asia Wealth Bank, in an attempt to make cash withdrawals on their savings.A serious financial crisis in 1988 set off the first demonstrations that led to the emergence of the pro-democracy movement led by Aung San Suu Kyi.Burmese language foreign radio stations meanwhile reported that the authorities had banned the publication of any reports about the death on February 17 of 14 students in a bus crash on the road from Syriam to Rangoon. Organisation last_img read more

Read More

first_imgTop StoriesBombay High Court Directs TV Today Network To Deposit Rs.5 Lakh To Grant Interim Protection In Plea Against BARC Nitish Kashyap23 Oct 2020 6:23 AMShare This – xThe Bombay High Court has directed the TV Today network to deposit Rs.5 lakh fine imposed on it by Broadcast Audience Research Council’s Disciplinary Council for violating its code of conduct. Court observed that “if the amount is deposited”, no coercive steps will be taken against the network.Division bench of Justice Nitin Jamdar and Justice Milind Jadhav were hearing via video conferencing…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Bombay High Court has directed the TV Today network to deposit Rs.5 lakh fine imposed on it by Broadcast Audience Research Council’s Disciplinary Council for violating its code of conduct. Court observed that “if the amount is deposited”, no coercive steps will be taken against the network.Division bench of Justice Nitin Jamdar and Justice Milind Jadhav were hearing via video conferencing a writ petition filed by TV Today Network Limited seeking protection against any further coercive steps after BARC’s Disciplinary Council had concluded that the petitioner network had indulged in viewership malpractice and issued a warning letter in this regard.According to the BARC’s order, there was an “abnormal jump” in daily viewership of the channels of TV Today network and it seemed like panel households were being influenced which is in violation of the Code of ConductSenior Advocate Dr. Virendra Tulzapurkar appeared on behalf of the petitioner network along with Dr.Abhinav Chandrachud and Advocate Ashish Kamat along with Advocate Thomas George for BARC.While, counsels for the petitioner sought interim protection and argued that the order passed by BARC was not reasonable and no evidence was produced in order to prove the allegations against them. Advocate Ashish Kamath raised the issue of maintainability.Court observed-“As regards the issue of maintainability raised by the learned counsel for the Respondent, identical matters are kept on board on 5 November 2020.It will be open to the Petitioner without prejudice to its rights and contentions to deposit the amount of Rs.5,00,000 as directed by the Respondent No.1’s Disciplinary Council in the registry of this Court. If this amount is deposited no coercive steps will be taken against the Petitioner in the meanwhile.”The next date of hearing in the case is November 5, 2020. Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

Read More

first_imgWhen the previous policy allowing schools in green zones to reopen was in force, the FSGI found at least 79 regions violated the policy. They found, for example, that some schools outside green zones reopened, and some preschools in green zones reopened even though the policy prohibited them from doing so.“We wonder why there were no sanctions from the government for these regions,” FSGI secretary-general Heru Purnomo said.Official data shows 57 percent of Indonesian students currently live in red and orange zones, while the remaining 43 percent are in green and yellow zones across 276 cities and regencies.Indonesian Pediatricians Association (IDAI) chairman Aman Pulungan questioned whether regions had an adequate number of polymerase chain reaction tests and intensive care beds to handle a potential spike in cases among children.“If they are not prepared, then don’t open the schools,” Aman said on Sunday.Education and Culture Minister Nadiem Makarim has repeatedly said that the decision to reopen is optional and that schools and parents have discretion to decide what is best.But critics say the policy could see parents sending their children back to school prematurely without taking the proper safety measures.Read also: 79 cities, regencies violate school-reopening protocols: Education MinistryAccording to the IDAI, 60 children have died of COVID-19 and thousands others have tested positive, though Aman said the numbers could be higher since the association’s records did not take into account fatalities among suspected cases and cases treated by non-pediatricians.The Health Ministry found that 6,584 children aged 6 to 17 years old had tested positive for the virus as of Aug. 6.“And even with these numbers only, we already have the highest number of child deaths from COVID-19 in the Asia-Pacific,” said Aman who is also the president of the Asia-Pacific Pediatrics Association. “The IDAI strongly opposes the decision to reopen schools.”Aman also urged the government to involve the IDAI in the formulation of health protocols and policy relating to children’s education during the pandemic.Epidemiologist Pandu Riono from the University of Indonesia said the government must stop making important policies based on its “inaccurate” zoning system.The government has color-coded regions to indicate COVID-19 threat levels, using green, yellow, orange and red. Green zones indicate low-risk areas, while red zones are at highest risk of transmission.“This zoning is inaccurate because it is based on data that might not be accurate. The data on COVID-19 cases really depends on the number of tests done. If one area has a low testing rate, it is possible that no cases are found there,” Pandu said.“It is a very risky ‘experiment’. We are not in a normal situation. If schools reopen only to be closed again due to the possible escalation of infections, it will only bring more trauma to students.”Topics : The government’s decision to allow more schools to reopen has drawn strong criticism from pediatricians and teachers who have been calling for schools to stay focused on distance learning to prevent children from contracting the coronavirus disease.Despite daily increases of infections in Indonesia, the government expanded on Friday a school reopening policy for schools in COVID-19 yellow zones, or moderate-risk areas. The decision comes only a month after schools in green zones, or low-risk areas, were given the green light to reopen.The Federation of Indonesian Teachers Associations (FSGI) said the change risked creating new infection clusters at schools. The group has received reports of at least 180 teachers and students from across the nation who have tested positive for the virus. “The right to live and the right for students, teachers and parents to be healthy are still the most important things,” FSGI deputy secretary-general Satriwan Salim said on Monday.“Children are also entitled to the right to education, but we have to remember that children who can get an education are children who are healthy and alive. Distance learning is the best option we have right now.”Read also: More schools to reopen amid pandemicThe FSGI said that while it was true that there were many limitations and technical problems hindering distance learning, reopening schools was not the answer.“The government and local administrations must first solve the problems of distance learning. There should be intense coordination across ministries, institutions and regional administrations to find the solutions. This is the key,” he added.last_img read more

Read More

first_imgMohammed Alshamrani in a photo released by the FBI. – (FBI)By ALEXANDER MALLIN and LUKE BARR, ABC News(WASHINGTON) — The Justice Department on Monday is expected to announce that the suspect who carried out the December shooting at a Pensacola Naval Air Station had communicated directly with a suspected Al Qaeda operative, a U.S. official familiar with the probe confirmed to ABC News.The FBI found that the suspect, Mohammed Alshamrani, a member of the Royal Saudi Air Force, was found to have been in touch with at least one member of the terrorist organization before the attack, that official said.Attorney General William Barr and FBI Director Christopher Wray are expected to make the announcement at a press conference later Monday morning.Alshamrani was killed by law enforcement during the attack.The shooting at that Pensacola, Florida, naval base in December killed four people and wounded eight.In a news conference in January, the attorney general said an investigation of the shooter has determined he was “motivated by jihadist ideology,” and called the attack an “act of terrorism.”The Justice Department has said that twelve of the 21 Saudi students identified were trainees at the Pensacola Naval Air Station while the other nine were receiving their training in military facilities across the U.S.A review of the trainees computers and personal devices found that several of the students had possessed “derogatory material.”“Seventeen had social media containing some jihadi or anti-American content,” Barr said. “However, there was no evidence of any affiliation or involvement with any terrorist activity or group. 15 individuals (including some of the 17 just mentioned) had had some kind of contact with child pornography.”The trainees were not prosecuted by the United States, but the Saudi armed forces had determined the cases “demonstrated conduct unbecoming an officer,” and the students were subsequently dis-enrolled from service, Barr said.On Sept. 11, the shooter posted a message on social media the “countdown has begun.” Investigators also learned that he visited the 9/11 Memorial in New York City over Thanksgiving weekend, and posted anti-American messages as recently as two hours before carrying out the attack at the base.FBI Deputy Director David Bowdich said at the time, the FBI interviewed “more than 500 people.” The shooting itself lasted 15 minutes, Bowdich said, he was engaged by law enforcement about eight minutes in. He was killed by responding law enforcement and found to have possessed 180 rounds of ammunition.The FBI also determined that the shooter had studied Al Qaeda’s U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, whose propaganda campaign may have inspired more radicals than anyone outside of Osama Bin Laden before he was killed in a U.S. drone strike in 2011.The shooting also exposed a rift between U.S. law enforcement and Apple.At the time, Barr and Bowdich criticized Apple for its lack of cooperation, saying that the company has “has not given us any substantive assistance.”Apple, in a statement, rebutted the characterization.“The characterization that Apple has not provided substantive assistance in the Pensacola investigation. Our responses to their many requests since the attack have been timely, thorough and are ongoing.”“Within hours of the FBI’s first request on December 6th, we produced a wide variety of information associated with the investigation. From December 7th through the 14th, we received six additional legal requests and in response provided information including iCloud backups, account information and transactional data for multiple accounts,” the company said.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

first_imgThe 2011-12 award winning chapters will be recognized in the November/December issue of “inChemistry” magazine, Chemical & Engineering News, and at the ACS Student Chapter Award Ceremony that will be held at the 245th ACS National Meeting in New Orleans in the Spring of 2013. Award Recognizes Work to Expand Science Education and Interest in Regional Communities The Evergreen Chemistry Club has won a Commendable Chapter Award from the American Chemical Society (ACS) for the 2011-12 academic year.The American Chemical Society award recognizes the work of the Chemistry Club in its promotion of science in the community, at The Evergreen State College, and throughout Thurston County.According to Dr. Dharshi Bopegedera, a Professor of Chemistry at Evergreen and Faculty Advisor to the Club, the award is a recognition of students’ work conducting science labs in various area schools and libraries, helping to judge science fairs, engaging in educational conferences and symposia, touring academic and industrial labs, attending the Spring National Meeting of the ACS, conducting book and canned food drives, writing successful grant proposals, and helping with the annual Science Carnival event. Facebook0Tweet0Pin0 Evergreen’s Science Carnival attracts thousands of people each spring seeking to expand their scientific knowledge and have fun.last_img read more

Read More