first_img Tags: 2019 U17 AFCONFabin Paa Kwasi SamuelJackson Mageratopuganda cubs Magera (left) and Kwesi (right) during one of the training sessions in Kenya recently. (FUFA Photos)CAF U17-AFCON FinalsDar es Salaam, Tanzania14th – 28th AprilNAIROBI – The Uganda U17 National football team, the Cubs have finally departed for Tanzania ahead of the 2019 U17 AFCON finals.They have been in Kenya for 10 days where they had been training in order at acclimatize to high temperatures which are equivalent to those in Dar es Salaam.While in Kenya, they played two build up games against the Kenya U18 (0-0) and Gor Mahia FC U20 (4-4).A contingent of 31 personnel which comprised of 21 players and 10 officials left Nairobi for Dar es Salaam aboard Kenya Airways on Wednesday morning.Before departure, the team head coach Kwesi Fabin praised his assistant Jackson Magera and also sighted his team’s improvement.“I think they are doing well and fortunately, we have an able assistant who did a good job, said Kwesi.“Therefore, we are just adding onto what has been done already and so far it’s been good.“It is common knowledge that when you gather children at the U17 level and move them out of their country to another (country), it gives them enough energy to work hard due to that excitement and since we came in Kenya the boys have performed very well and improved day by day.The Cubs are expected to carry out a mandatory Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) test on Thursday 11th April before their first fixture against Angola on Sunday.The Cubs will carry out MRI tests on Thursday.Uganda is in group A along with the hosts Tanzania, Nigeria and Angola.The top two teams in each of the two groups will qualify automatically for the U17 FIFA World Cup that will be held in Brazil.The 2019 AFCON U17 Groups:Group A: Tanzania, Angola, Nigeria, and UgandaGroup B: Guinea, Cameroon, Senegal, and MoroccoThe Cubs’ fixtures at the 2019 AFCON U17 Finals:-Angola vs Uganda (Sunday, 14-04-2019).-Uganda vs Tanzania (Wednesday, 17-04-2019).-Nigeria vs Uganda (Saturday, 20-04-2019).The Cubs squad for the 2019 U17 AFCON Finals:Goalkeepers: Oyo Delton (Kirinya Jinja SS FC), Jack Komakech (Ndejje University FC), and Mubiru Patrick (Bright Stars FC).Out Field Players: Kevin Ssekimbegga (Express FC), Ibrahim Juma (KCCA FC), Kasozi Samson (Bright Stars FC), Kizito Mugweri Gavin (Vipers SC), Opira Innocent (Ndejje University), Ssekajja Davis (Bright Stars FC), Kakaire Thomas (Bright Stars FC), Iddi Abdul Wahid (Cagliari FC – Italy), Mwaka Polycarp (Ndejje University FC), Opaala Edrine Mukisa (Kirinya Jinja SS FC), John Kokas Alou (URA FC), Jarieko James (Paidha Black Angels FC), Asaba Ivan (Vipers SC), Najib Yiga (Vipers SC), Mugulusi Isma (Kirinya Jinja SS FC), Mugisha Rogers (Mbarara City FC), Opiro Justine(KCCA SA), Kawooya Andrew (Vipers SC).Officials:Ariga Rasoul – Leader of DelegationPaa Samuel Kwesi Fabin – Head CoachMagera Jackson – 1st Assistant coachHamuza Lutalo – 2nd Assistant coachMubarak Kiberu – Goalkeeper coachOsei-Owusu Derrick – Physical fitness coachEmmanuel Nakabago – Team DoctorBashir Mutyaba – Team CoordinatorOmaria Bosco – Team Media OfficerBumpenje Frank – Kit ManagerComments last_img read more

Read More

first_imgHaving a continuous integration and deployment (CI/CD) pipeline for a project is almost mandatory nowadays. With cloud-native software in general and Kubernetes applications in particular, developers and operators face new challenges: How do I run my end-to-end tests in a Kubernetes environment? How can I automate the process of testing and releasing my application for different platforms and Kubernetes versions?This post will walk you through the different steps needed to set up in a CI/CD system when working with open-source projects, so you and your users can benefit from community contributions, while maintaining the best quality possible in the code.Cloud-native applications have several interesting characteristics that are very convenient in an environment like Kubernetes. First of all, they are based on multiple microservices. When updating a microservice, you usually want to ship it and use it as quickly as possible. To be confident about doing this, you need to run tests.  Unit tests are easy, but the challenge with microservices comes with the need to test the interaction between them, to be sure you are not introducing regressions. That’s when end-to-end tests come in handy.If you are working on an open-source project, you will probably want a community to support it. Having people submit new issues and pull requests is critical for medium- and large projects. While you want to keep contributions coming from new users, you also want their code to maintain the same quality as that in the project. This means you want their code to run the same battery of e2e tests, even before you look into it. This implies that you will end up running untrusted code in your CI system, so you will need to be prepared for this.Finally, once new changes are in the master branch, you may want to release a new version of your application. This may happen several times a month or even several times a week. Therefore, the process of creating new releases should be as automated as possible, enabling you to create releases as often as you want. If your project is using Kubernetes, the easiest (and most common) way to make the application available to your users is through a Helm chart. It’s also important to keep the maintenance of those charts in the automated pipeline to avoid disruptions.Fortunately, it is possible to use open source and free tools to achieve an end-to-end scenario, from developing your code, testing changes, and publishing new versions.The toolingRelevant  tools include:GitHub for storing code.Any CI system to run the pipeline. Note that any CI is valid here as long as it has support for running Docker containers.A Kubernetes distribution for deploying the application for the e2e tests. In particular, you can use:Kind to run e2e tests and untrusted code. The good thing about kind is that it allows you to run Kubernetes just having a Docker daemon running. Also since you will be running kind in CircleCI, you don’t need to worry about compromising your infrastructure.GKE to run e2e tests in an environment that is closer to a production deployment. Note that these tests will be running in your GKE account. You will only want to do this when the code has been properly reviewed. Again, any managed Kubernetes provider is a good option here as long as it mimics how the application can be deployed in production. Creating a cluster in GKE (or any other managed Kubernetes system) is a bit more complicated. You need to check if you have the required credentials, check if the cluster has not already been created, and wait for the cluster to be healthy before doing anything else. You can take a look at the script we use to ensure that you perform the different steps.To start the cluster, you will need to execute something similar to:Where BRANCH is the Kubernetes major version (e.g 1.11), ZONE is the GCloud zone where you will create your cluster and CLUSTER is the name of the cluster.Load your images in the clusterThis is only needed when using kind, since in the GKE environment, the new images can be pulled from the Docker registry.Since you stored the images in your workspace in stage 1, loading them is quite easy using kind:Install your application using the new imagesThis step may vary a lot depending on the requirements of your application or the end-to-end scenario you want to run. In our case, we install the application using the Helm chart present in the repository, making sure we use the recently built images:Run e2e tests!Finally, you are ready to run your test. Depending on your project, you may want to run web browser tests, Helm chart tests, or bash tests… In our case, we use the Helm framework to run our tests. If you are curious, find the test script used in Kubeapps here.Stage 3 – The releaseThe canonical way of creating a release in GitHub is to create a tag. Once a tag is created the CI will pick it up as a branch and will trigger the configured workflow. To specify a job that will be run only if there is a release, set a filter:The above means that the job release will only be executed for tags starting with a “v” and only if the e2e tests succeed.Now it’s time to publish images using a release tag and push them to the Docker registry so they can be used in the new chart:Automating the chart releaseAt this point, the new images for the microservices are published, but there is still one final step to end the process. If you are using a Helm chart to distribute your application, you need to push a new version.In our case, for triggering a Helm chart update, we just need to bump the version in the Chart.yaml file of the chart we host in the repository. In every build, we compare that value with the latest one published. If the local version is different, we trigger the upgrade process. Once a new version is discovered, we make sure that the chart contains the latest images and we push the new chart to a Helm chart registry.To find the bash library that we use for all the operations related to updating a Helm chart, click here.That’s it! With that, I have covered the whole process from adding new code to a project, running tests in a secure way, and publishing a new release.To take away: Automate all the things!When working on an open source project in a cloud-native environment, it’s important to:Automate the process of testing and deploying changes as much as possible.Run e2e tests! In a microservice world, just running unit tests is not enough.Run tests in different scenarios, in parallel. Running tests for a single platform (more if it’s a development platform) is risky. You want to test an environment that’s the closest possible to production.Provide the tooling to external contributors so they can submit code like you would.If you have any questions, suggestions or proposals, contact the Kubeapps team on the #kubeapps channel on Kubernetes slack!To learn more about containerized infrastructure and cloud native technologies, consider coming to KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Barcelona, May 20-23 in Barcelona. The applicationIn the example below, I’ve have applied multiple techniques to set up the CI/CD of a real-world app Kubeapps, which is an open-source project. It is deployed in Kubernetes and it is hosted in GitHub. It’s also available for users as a Helm chart, so it makes a perfect fit for the use case I want to demonstrate.The continuous integration and deployment journeyOur CI pipeline will be composed of three different stages and will look something like this:See the configuration for a fully working example here.Stage 1 – Unit testing and image buildingThe first set of jobs will execute the unit tests and will generate the Docker images for each one of the microservices. These jobs can be run in parallel. You can do so for as many microservices as you have. Note that all the microservices are sharing the same Git repository. This is useful for scenarios in which a new feature requires changes in several services. That way you can have all the related changes in the different microservices in the same development branch.If all those jobs succeed, then go to the next stage and use the generated images to run your end-to-end tests.One particular thing to notice is that you won’t be able to push new Docker images when working with PRs since external users won’t have the credentials needed to push to the project registry. To be able to share the images for stage 2, you need to store them as files.To store the image my-repo/my-image in the folder images, execute the following:But, in the case when you actually have credentials, you want to push your images to a registry, for example in the master branch or when running a release job. That’s something easy to achieve, just log in with your registry account and push a development tag for your image.Stage 2 – E2E testsAt this point, you have Docker images for all the microservices with the new changes. To run your e2e test, you need to perform several steps.Spin up a Kubernetes platformThis will be kind for PRs and GKE for trusted code (either master or a release tag).Creating a cluster with kind is quite easy, just download the latest version and run a command:last_img read more

Read More

first_imgThe shy wallflower joins the ranks of many other plants that self-fertilize. But it takes different strokes for different folks: Often, this lonely pollination happens simply when flowers close and the anthers touch the stigma. What’s uncommon about Erysimum incanum is that the self-fertilization occurs while the flower is opening. The new move would be no surprise to Charles Darwin, who in 1876 suggested that flowers in places with few pollinators would likely engage in self-fertilization. And that seems to be the case with Erysimum incanum: Pollinate your rosebuds while ye may. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Erik StokstadFeb. 14, 2019 , 2:35 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Unlike lovelorn humans, ground-bound plants can’t go searching for a partner; instead, they rely on the wind—or pollinators such as bees—to transfer pollen from one flower to another. But if pollinators haven’t paid a visit, many plants can self-fertilize. Now, researchers have discovered a new way this “self-love” happens, and it’s rather graceful. Erysimum incanum is a demure variety of wallflower that grows in the scrublands of Spain and northwest Africa. While studying its millimeterwide flowers in the lab, researchers noticed slow gyrations of its anthers, the pollen-bearing ends of tiny stalks, as the flower opened. Sometimes, the anthers rubbed their pollen directly onto the stigma, the central structure that contains the ovary. On other occasions, the anthers rubbed against each other, causing pollen to fall off and land on the stigma. Researchers photographed the dance (sped up, above) and compared the flower with other species, such as the purple flower with stationary anthers at the end of the video above.Seeds from the self-fertilization grew into healthy plants without any inbreeding problems, the researchers report online in The American Naturalist. Another sign the reproductive strategy pays off: Self-fertilized plants produced just as many seeds as plants that were hand-fertilized with pollen from other plants. Watch this shy plant engage in some ‘self-love’ when it can’t find any pollinators Emaillast_img read more

Read More