first_img FA targets gambling cash with ‘fair return’ proposal The English Football Association (FA) has set out proposals to introduce a levy on bets to in order to draw more money from the gambling sector and help fund development of the sport at grassroots level. Martin Glenn, chief executive of the FA, revealed the plans during an interview with the Telegraph, saying that such a move could push funding for the body’s ‘Football Foundation’ initiative past £100m (€112.7m/$128.1m). Glenn said the FA, Premier League and government currently commit £64m to the project, which supports grassroots football initiatives across the country. The FA had expected the sale of Wembley Stadium to boost funds, but after the £600m deal involving American Shahid Khan fell through earlier this month, it is now seeking other sources of income, with gambling seemingly top of the hit list. Gambling has a huge affiliation, with nine out of 20 teams in the Premier League having shirt sponsorship deals in place with gambling firms, while 17 clubs in the second-tier Championship have similar agreements. “There are things definitely worthy of consideration,” Glenn told the newspaper. “France has effectively a tax on gambling. We would call it a fair return on football gambling.” “All those betting companies use our intellectual property to have people lay bets, so why wouldn’t a small percentage of that be put into the thing that made that possible in the first place? We, as football, could approach government and say ‘Have you thought about something like that?” Glenn’s comments are similar to those made by senior executives at some of the major sports leagues in the US in regards to so-called ‘integrity fees’. Since the repeal of PASPA earlier this year, some leagues have been calling for states that legalise sports betting to feature a clause in legislation whereby the leagues would receive a cut of wagering revenue, in return for the gambling companies taking bets on their respective competitions. However, the leagues are yet to convince any state to adopt this approach, with West Virginia recently snubbing NBA, MLB and PGA Tour proposals. Glenn said that the fee operators could face in the UK “doesn’t need to be a big lump sum” but it would be “brilliant” if the FA were able to increase budgets for grassroots football. He said: “We’ve got £64m going into the Football Foundation between the three of us – imagine if it was £80m or £100m. If we could get to that it would be brilliant.” Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: UK & Ireland Funds would be used to support football’s development at grassroots levelcenter_img Topics: Finance Sports betting AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 26th October 2018 | By contenteditor Financelast_img read more

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first_img Regions: UK & Ireland The UK Gambling Commission has pledged to make online gaming safer and fairer for consumers after unveiling an updated list of rules for operators. Topics: Legal & compliance Email Address AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter The UK Gambling Commission has pledged to make online gaming safer and fairer for consumers after unveiling an updated list of rules for operators.Published following an open consultation, the new regulations require operators to verify customers’ age and identity details faster.Licensed operators must now complete all verification checks before a customer can make a deposit, place a bet – either with their own money or bonus funds – or access free-to-play versions of online games.Previously, consumers could make deposits and place bets for up to 72 hours while the operator carried out age verification checks. However, they could not withdraw funds in this period and the operator was required to return any stake funds if the player was found to be underage.In changing this rule, the Commission said it will help guard against the risk of children gambling online.Meanwhile, the Commission has also made a series of changes to the verification process for withdrawing funds. This comes in response to a CMA report last year that identified a level of dissatisfaction among some consumers about having to provide additional identity information when withdrawing money.Under the new rules, remote licensees are required to, as a minimum, verify the name, address and date of birth of a customer before allowing them to gamble. If any additional information is required the operator should request this as soon as possible after the initial verification.Licensed operators should also inform customers – before they can deposit funds – of the types of identity documents or other information that might be required, the circumstances in which this information may be required, and how it should be supplied.In addition, the Commission said operators must take reasonable steps to ensure information on their customers’ identities remains accurate.The regulator said the changes will help operators better prevent harm or detect criminal activity, as they will have more information about their customers, and also help licensees identify players that are trying to gamble while self-excluded.Gambling Commission chief executive Neil McArthur said: “These changes will protect children and the vulnerable from gambling-related harm, and reduce the risk of crime linked to gambling. They will also make gambling fairer by helping consumers collect their winnings without unnecessary delay.’’Jeremy Wright, Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, in the UK, also backed the changes, saying they add an extra layer of protection for children and young people who attempt to gamble online.Wright added: “By extending strong age verification rules to free-to-play games we are creating a much safer online environment for children, helping to shut down a possible gateway to gambling-related harm.”The updated rules will come into effect on May 7, whilst the Commission will also launch a consultation on plans to make explicit its expectations about how to interact with a customer who may be experiencing gambling-related harm.The Commission has made a number of announcements in recent months in relation to making gambling fairer safer for consumers in the UK. Earlier this month, the regulator launched an investigation into the use of non-disclosure agreements in operators’ settlements with customers after claiming they could breach licence conditions.This year, the Commission will also launch a new strategy covering 12 priority actions, ranging from consulting a culture of evaluation to piloting intervention.Image: Santeri Viinamäki Gambling Commission publishes new igaming rules Tags: Online Gambling 8th February 2019 | By contenteditor Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Legal & compliancelast_img read more

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first_img Topics: Finance UK’s leading credit providers have vowed to play their part in minimising problem gambling after the Gambling Commission announced the launch of a consultation on gambling with credit. UK Finance, a body which represents more than 250 firms across the UK’s finance and banking industry, will submit evidence to the regulator’s new investigation Regions: UK & Ireland Tags: Payments UK’s leading credit providers have vowed to play their part in minimising problem gambling after the Gambling Commission announced the launch of a consultation on gambling with credit.The regulator for Great Britain’s gambling industry has called on stakeholders including gambling operators and financial institutions, as well as debt relief charities and individual consumers to provide evidence about the use of credit in gambling.The Commission, which has already said it backs restrictions on credit in principle, said the findings of the consultation would be used to consider whether regulatory interventions such as restricting or prohibiting gambling via credit cards are necessary.It is requesting data and evidence to help develop a comprehensive picture of gambling with credit cards, including the scale of their use for gambling and the risks associated.UK Finance, a body which represents more than 250 firms across the UK’s finance and banking industry including Barclaycard, Capital One and Citigroup, told iGamingBusiness.com it would be one of the stakeholders that will be submitting evidence before the May 16 deadline.“The banking industry wants to help customers avoid the risk of gambling-related harm,” a spokesperson said. “The industry continues to liaise closely with government, the Gambling Commission and consumer groups to build on existing initiatives by a number of credit card issuers, including schemes that allow customers to block the use of their card for online gambling.“We look forward to further engagement on this issue and will be responding to the Gambling Commission’s call for evidence in due course.”The consultation comes after the Responsible Gambling Strategy Board last year recommended the restriction of consumers’ ability to gamble online with credit, including prohibiting gambling online with credit cards.The Commission has already outlined its support for the principle that “consumers should not gamble with money they do not have”.It added: “We said we would consider restricting or prohibiting the use of credit cards for gambling, but that we would explore the consequences of doing so. We therefore committed to conduct further work in this area.”Reacting to the launch of the consultation, the Remote Gambling Association told iGamingBusiness.com: “Over the coming weeks the RGA will work closely with the Gambling Commission to gather the information and evidence needed.“We support proposals that payment providers should offer their customers the ability to ask for gambling transactions to be blocked on their accounts, some banks already offer this and credit card payments could be included in that option.”Charity GambleAware, which has this week launched a new Safer Gambling Campaign, reiterated its call for a ban on credit usage in gambling.“We have been calling for a ban on the use of credit cards online for some time now,” said Marc Etches, chief executive of GambleAware.“Gambling on the basis of credit increases the risk that consumers will gamble with more money than they can afford. The risk is further elevated by the fact that there are no statutory limits to stakes and prizes online as there are for other forms of gambling in Britain.”“We have been calling for a ban on the use of credit cards online for some time now. Gambling on the basis of credit increases the risk that consumers will gamble with more money than they can afford. The risk is further elevated by the fact that there are no statutory limits to stakes and prizes online as there are for other forms of gambling in Britain.Meanwhile, the Commission has also instigated a call for evidence for gambling businesses to outline how they will meet the challenges set out in the government’s Review of Gaming Machines and Social Responsibility Measures over the protections for players using Category B gaming machines.The Commission said data indicates that the risks associated with Category B1 and B3 machines are broadly similar to the risks with B2 machines at a £100 maximum stake – with the Commission last year advising the government that it wants to explore further player protection options. Those options include tracking play, using time and monetary limits and alerts, and communicating messages about gambling safely.Paul Hope, an executive director at the Gambling Commission, said: “We are exploring measures that could help reduce the risk of harm to consumers who use their credit cards to gamble online, and to those who play on all Category B machines.“We want consumers, gambling firms and other interested parties to have their say and provide evidence that will help us make gambling safer.” 21st February 2019 | By contenteditor Finance giants vow to join responsible gambling push Email Address Finance Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterlast_img read more

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address iGaming affiliate marketing giant Raketech entered the online casino market with the launch of its new brand Rapidi.Powered by Bethard Group’s Together Gaming platform and featuring Trustly’s rapid deposit solution Pay N Play, the offering will be promoted across Raketech’s network of affiliate sites.“I’m excited to launch a new product vertical that will support growth across Raketech’s core business and provide new insight to share in dialogue with our partners – the gaming operators – as part of our strategy to deliver win-win partnerships,” Raketech chief executive Michael Holmberg said.Raketech aims to gain additional insight into casino player habits through the launch, which it will use to enhance its core affiliate assets and improve lead conversion.“We never stop learning and have a data-driven approach to improving our products and business strategy,” Holmberg explained. “Rapidi will help us study a modern casino player’s behaviour and gain insight to help us understand more about the performance of our products and increase conversion.“We will analyse the results to better serve our users with quality content and generate valuable leads for our partners.”Rapidi, which operates under licences from the Malta Gaming Authority and Swedish regulator Spelinspektionen, is currently available to players in Sweden and Finland, with Raketech planning to expand the brand into other European markets. 10th June 2019 | By contenteditor Topics: Casino & games Marketing & affiliates Strategy Regions: Europe Nordics Finland Sweden Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Raketech launches new casino brand Rapidi iGaming affiliate marketing giant Raketech entered the online casino market with the launch of its new brand Rapidi. The site, powered by Bethard Group’s Together Gaming platform and featuring Trustly’s rapid deposit solution Pay N Play, is live for Finnish and Swedish players. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Casino & gameslast_img read more

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first_img Email Address Scientific Games has agreed a deal with marketing platform provider Blue Ribbon to begin offering jackpots via its Open Gaming System (OGS) content aggregation platform.Through the deal, Blue Ribbon will deploy jackpot marketing platform for games hosted on OGS, allowing Scientific Games’ clients to use jackpots to engage and retain players.“We’re starting to finalise our full portfolio of casino content and technology under the umbrella of Open Casino, which includes our player account, our OGS, the world’s best content and now, new revolutionary features such as missions, tournaments and jackpots,” Dylan Slaney, senior vice president for casino and platforms for Scientific Games’ interactive division SG Digital, said.“Combining platform scale, ground-breaking content and feature innovation is where the magic will happen for player experiences,” Slaney explained. “Pairing their jackpot innovation with our OGS platform is the perfect combination, bringing players new ways to enjoy our games with an added layer of game-expanding features.”Amir Askarov, chief executive of Blue Ribbon, added: “For the first time, OGS partners will be able to control and manage their jackpots to build better engagement while players enjoy the seamless and intuitive gaming experience which is aligned with their gaming preferences.” Tags: Online Gambling Marketing & affiliates 12th July 2019 | By contenteditor Scientific Games pens jackpots deal with Blue Ribboncenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Marketing & affiliates Tech & innovation Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Scientific Games has agreed a deal with marketing platform provider Blue Ribbon to begin offering jackpots via its Open Gaming System (OGS) content aggregation platform.last_img read more

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first_imgMarketing & affiliates AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address Asia-facing online gaming operator 19.com has entered into a partnership with English Premier League football club Leicester City. 19.com will serve as the team’s official betting partner. 12th August 2019 | By contenteditor Asia-facing online gaming operator 19.com has entered into a partnership with English Premier League football club Leicester City.Under the multi-season deal, the length of which was not disclosed, 19.com will serve as the team’s official betting partner.19.com branding will appear on LED advertising boards inside the club’s King Power Stadium home ground, as well as on interview backdrops.“As one of the leading online gaming brands in Asia, 19.com is proud to announce our partnership with the Foxes and bring our brand to the UK market,” 19.com spokesperson Jamie Dillon said.“We see this partnership with the former Premier League champions as the perfect platform to provide the 19.com brand with important and valuable exposure.”Harj Hir, head of partnerships at Leicester City, added: “We are continuing to build our international profile and this partnership is an exciting one for the football club.“It will help to strengthen our global reputation, particularly in Asia where we have a strong presence and significant status in the region.”Leicester City had previously been working with online gaming brand W88.Image: Ungry Young Mancenter_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: UK & Ireland Topics: Marketing & affiliates Sports betting 19.com nets new partnership with Leicester Citylast_img read more

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first_img Topics: Sports betting theScore seals Colorado sportsbook access deal Score Media and Gaming, a division of Canadian media business theScore, is to launch mobile sports betting in Colorado via a new partnership with gaming operator Jacobs Entertainment Inc. (JEI).Under the deal, agreed with a subsidiary of JEI, Score Media and Gaming will roll out its theScore Bet mobile sports wagering application in the state later this year.JEI will receive a percentage of revenue derived from theScore Bet’s operations in Colorado – subject to certain annual minimum guaranteed amounts – and an initial upfront fee.The deal, which is subject to theScore receiving all of the relevant licences and approvals from the Colorado Division of Gaming, will run for an initial term of 10 years, extendable for two successive five-year terms at theScore’s option.Read the full story on iGB North America. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Score Media and Gaming, a division of Canadian media business theScore, is to launch mobile sports betting in Colorado via a new partnership with gaming operator Jacobs Entertainment Inc. (JEI). Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter 24th January 2020 | By contenteditor Sports betting Email Address Regions: US Colorado Tags: Mobilelast_img read more

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first_img Topics: Casino & games Finance Lottery Sports betting Poker Slots AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter News of significant reopenings and sporting restarts in June saw a slight rebound in H2 Gambling Capital’s expectations for the European and Asian markets in 2020. Covid-19: annual expectations rebound in Asia and Europe Casino & games Tags: Card Rooms and Poker Online Gambling Slot Machines 29th May 2020 | By Stephen Carter News of significant reopenings and sporting restarts in June saw a slight rebound in H2 Gambling Capital’s expectations for the European and Asian markets in 2020.iGB’s principal data partner now projects gross gaming revenue in the Asia/Oceania region to come in 22.8% behind pre-pandemic expectations, compared to 23.1% in last week’s update.Stronger-than-expected Chinese lottery data and Japanese betting numbers were a contributor to the adjustment (Chart 3).In Europe, the Netherlands brought forward the reopening date for its casinos and arcades, while the UK announced the reopening of betting shops and the restart of horse racing and EPL football, the latter from 17 June.H2 now estimates revenues to come in 22.8% lower than pre-crisis expectations, compared to 22.9% last week (Chart 4).Overall however, projections for the global gambling market fell a further $1bn or 0.2% to 21.9% over the last week (see Charts 1 and 2).H2 also noted the increase in Covid-19 cases in South Korea, reiterating that its expectations represented the best case scenario for the global gambling sector and its belief that social distanced operating conditions in venues would make for a difficult remainder of the year.For more from H2 on how the Covid-19 outbreak is impacting the industry, listen to iGB’s brand new podcast in partnership with the data specialists. Right To The Source is available now on Apple Podcasts Regions: Africa Asia Europe LATAM US North Africa & Middle East Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

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first_img Regions: Europe Nordics Sweden Pinnacle-owned PinBet joins Swedish operator association Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Pinnacle-owned online sports betting operator, PinBet, has been appointed as a new member of the Swedish trade association for online gambling, Branscheförenigen för Onlinespel (BOS).Pinnacle was granted a gaming licence by Swedish regulator Spelinspektionen in December 2019, but refrained from entering the market until June 2020.Prior to this, Pinnacle had not been active in Sweden for two years, a period during which it applied for and secured its licence to operate in the country’s newly regulated market.PinBet now joins BOS, the trade association which has recently issued a number of challenges to the Swedish government on regulatory changes. In June, it hit out at the government’s revised set of temporary restrictions it planned to implement during the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic, saying that they would seriously harm the market and its licensees.The temporary measures included a SEK5,000 (£428/€482/$545) weekly deposit limit for online casino, as well as a cap on bonuses of SEK100.BOS suggested the regulator’s approach was not evidence-based, and pointed to a study showing that, during the novel coronavirus (covid-19) pandemic, customers in Sweden, Norway, Finland and Germany were betting less overall than prior to the pandemic.Commenting on the appointment of PinBet as a BOS member, the association’s secretary general, Gustaf Hoffstedt, said: “We are happy to welcome PinBet among our fellowship of members. Its parent company Pinnacle is one of the world’s most well-known online gambling operators, and we are sure they will bring much insight to our association. Together with PinBet and all our other members we continue our efforts for a safe and reliable Swedish gambling market”Pinnacle’s chief executive, Paris Smith, also commented on the benefits of the association to the market’s development: “Over 20 years of experience has taught us that these collective efforts to provide a safe and enjoyable experience for customers around the world are in the best interests of everyone involved in the industry.”“Our focus on the Swedish market extends far beyond another market for us to operate in, it’s also another opportunity for us to lend our expertise to a country that is making important shifts in regulation. It’s great to be a part of the work that the Swedish Trade Association for Online Gambling is doing and we are certainly optimistic for the impact it will have” 9th September 2020 | By Conor Mulheir Topics: Sports betting AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address Pinnacle-owned online sports betting operator, PinBet, has been appointed as a new member of the Swedish trade association for online gambling, Branscheförenigen för Onlinespel (BOS). Sports bettinglast_img read more

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first_imgTake a hikeCoincidentally, perhaps, at the same time that the Commission was in receipt of the advice on Football Index, McArthur was himself taking to the stage at a conference put together by the law firm CMS to issue a warning to the assembled industry executives, lawyers and consultants. Topics: Legal & compliance Compliance Legal Licensing Regulation None of this is denying that responsible gambling isn’t an issue which needs to be addressed by the GB gambling regulator. But McArthur’s public health obsession made it look like this was all the Commission was concerned about. Those in the industry who believed problem gambling was “simply a fact of life and cannot be changed” needed to “find another job,” he portentously intoned from the stage But not anyone from the industry or, indeed, the author of the unsolicited report. The Commission protested last week that it had launched a formal review of Football Index last May and that at the time it saw no grounds for suspending the company’s licence. It said it “utilised expertise from across the Commission itself as well as that of a QC”. After lambasting the industry in recent years for what he clearly saw as its neglect in the realm of responsible gambling, it was a basic failure of regulatory oversight that appears to have done for his own tenure in the top job. Legal & compliance This warning consisted of a report into the firm which suggested it was effectively a pyramid selling scheme and that when user growth declined or stopped altogether – as it finally did earlier this year – then the company would quickly be in trouble. Regions: UK & Ireland Particularly when, according to a report in The Guardian, it was given warning by industry sources that Football Index was in trouble over a year before the liquidity issues that went on to engulf the company. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter The collapse of the football stock market was the straw that broke the back of Neil McArthur’s controversial tenure as chief executive of the GB regulator and underlined his consistent failure to grasp the nuances of his job, writes Scott Longley. The collapse of Football Index does few any favours and the anti-gambling lobby were quick to use it as a stick to beat the Commission and DCMS. Of course there have been no links drawn on the Commission’s part between McArthur’s departure and Football Index entering administration, but the timing is certainly noteworthy. Well, one of those nuances was understanding how consumers can be harmed in ways other than as part of a concocted health crisis. And lo, what should come along soon enough after his comments? A crisis with a Gambling Commission-licensed firm where some informed leadership and a bit or proper regulatory oversight might have saved many consumers hundreds and perhaps thousands of pounds. Whether an ombudsman would have made any difference in the case of Football Index is moot. But what is certainly true is that McArthur’s obsession has done no one any favours: not the Football Index players, not the sector, not the minister in charge and not the Commission itself. The next chief executive at the Commission will certainly have a job on his hands, coming as it does while we are in the midst of two very important consultations – on affordability and, of course, the Gambling Act review. The task is to negotiate some very choppy waters. Waters that were in part stirred up by the words and deeds of their predecessor. 24th March 2021 | By contenteditor Normally when someone leaves a high-profile post there are the usual blandishments about wishing them well in their next endeavours. In this instance, though, the gambling industry might well find it convenient to be elsewhere when the best-of-luck card does the rounds.Scott Longley has been a journalist since the early 2000s, covering personal finance, sport and gambling. He has worked for a number of publications including Investment Week, Bloomberg Money, Football First., eGaming Review and Gambling Compliance. Scott now runs his own editorial consultancy, Clear Concise Media, and writes for a number of online and print titles. There is perhaps an irony to the departure of Neil McArthur from the post of chief executive at the Gambling Commission. But in this, for once, they are right to be angry. Sure, regulators can’t stop bad business plans from being hatched and even launched. It has arguably, also, counted towards the masking of problems elsewhere at the Birmingham-based body, not the least of which was a lack of communicativeness and a tardiness in responding to licensees and their representatives on licensing issues. There is a theory that the Football Index scandal makes a Gambling Ombudsman all but inevitable. Certainly, the Commission is now under even greater scrutiny from a government that will be unhappy with having a scandal dumped on its doorstep. Experts by experience – sorry, those with lived experience – are apparently only needed by McArthur’s Commission in the area of gambling harms; when it comes to other aspects of the sector, it appears to have preferred taking a more Govian stance. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter But in its oversight across the whole sector, the regulator should be able to spot when there are problems developing among any of its licensees. Tags: Gambling Commission Neil McArthur Football Index DCMS Commission chief takes the rap for Football Index failure To these eyes, and perhaps to those of the Culture department secretary of state Oliver Dowden, it very much looks like McArthur – encouraged no doubt by also-soon-to-depart chairman Bill Moyes – concentrated his focus on flawed notions of problem gambling as a public health menace to the exclusion of other equally important aspects of the job. As this column said at the time, if McArthur was struggling to understand the nuances of his job, then it was right to suggest that perhaps he was in the wrong job. Email Addresslast_img read more

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