first_imgBenetton TrevisoFriday 7 January – ULSTER v BENETTON TREVISO, At Ravenhill, 7.05pm.TV: Live on BBC Sport NIReferee: Leighton Hodges (WRU, 4th League game).Ulster have lost their last two matches to Leinster and Munster and have not won at Ravenhill in the Magners League since Glasgow were the visitors on 1 October.Benetton Treviso took both “legs” of the Italian derby with Aironi over the holiday season. Treviso have not won a game outside of Italy since a trip to the Dragons in the European Cup on 15 December 2007.Ulster have won all five previous encounters with Treviso in all competitions.Ulster have named their starting XV and replacements to play Treviso in the Magners League at Ravenhill this Friday night (ko 7.05pm). TAGS: BenettonUlster Replacements (16-23) Nigel Brady, Bryan Young, Declan Fitzpatrick, Dan Tuohy, Stephen Ferris, Paul Marshall, Ian Whitten, David McIlwaine In the back line, only Simon Danielli retains the same position he played in the New Year’s Day derby against Munster at Thomond Park. While Paddy Wallace moves from out-half to inside centre, elsewhere it’s all change as D’Arcy replaces Smith at full-back, Trimble, rested last week, features on the right-wing, Nevin Spence is recalled to partner Wallace in the centre and Humphreys and Pienaar form the half-back partnership.Up front Tom Court, another player rested last week as part of the player management programme and BJ Botha start in the front row with captain Rory Best. Johann Muller returns to action partnered by Tim Barker who retains his place from last week while Chris Henry and Pedrie Wannenburg start ahead of TJ Anderson and Robbie Diack in the back row.Stephen Ferris is the notable inclusion on the bench having recovered from a leg injury sustained in training ahead of the December game against Bath at The Rec.Ulster, who defeated Treviso 9-19 in the away fixture at the end of November, will be looking to get their Magners League campaign back on track after defeats to Leinster and Munster over the festive period, particularly with important games in Europe ahead. Benetton Treviso won both legs of their festive derbies against Aironi over the holiday period.Gates open at 5.30pm and tickets for the match will be available to purchase on the gates.Ulster (15-9) Adam D’Arcy; Andrew Trimble, Nevin Spence, Paddy Wallace, Simon Danielli; Ian Humphreys, Ruan Pienaar (1-8) Tom Court, Rory Best (Captain), BJ Botha, Johann Muller, Tim Barker, Chris Henry, Willie Faloon, Pedrie Wannenburg LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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first_img Pride and honour: Oxford celebrate last year’s Varsity match win 33-15 over Cambridge “Excuse me for being human,” tweeted England footballer Raheem Sterling after dropping out of a Euro 2016 qualifier because of fatigue a few weeks ago. It’s a tweet that would resonate with Jacob Taylor, the man charged, as Oxford University captain, with steering the Dark Blues to an historic feat in this year’s Varsity Match at Twickenham.Never before have Oxford won five successive matches against their Cambridge counterparts, but that’s the prize on offer for Taylor following wins by 21-10, 28-10, 26-19 and 33-15, the last three of them coming under former Sale Sharks professional John Carter.With Taylor away, Carter attended a publicity event recently at which he pinpointed the moment last year when a group of talented individuals became a team.Oxford were on tour in Biarritz and Carter, disappointed by the amount of time players spent on their mobiles instead of engaging with those around them, was glad when a surfing session was arranged for the whole squad. The size of the waves, however, took them by surprise and fear replaced the gaiety as the players struggled in the swell. “It brought the group closer together and was a pivotal moment for us,” says Carter.Wallaby flyer: Jacob Taylor has represented Australia at Sevens levelThis year’s Oxford team has had no such epiphany but in Taylor, a student of anthropology at Keble College, the Dark Blues have a leader deeply appreciative of person-centred philosophy.“That anecdote about the surfing highlights the importance of non-rugby interaction and getting to know people off the field. Those moments when you share quite euphoric or threatening occasions, such as battling huge waves or being in a country where they don’t speak your language, are when you have to rely on team-mates.“John believes, as I do, in getting beyond the surface layer and interacting with players in a true way. That happens in the long term for any team but we only have a three-month window so must deliberately accelerate that process. It’s more crucial than the technical skills and we spend a serious amount of time together in the Michaelmas term.“I’ve done some research on this and last year we spent 25-30 hours a week in each other’s company, whether on the field, eating meals, in the gym or having physio. John spent more like 40-50 hours a week with the team, so for some it’s like a full-time job. We have a group of highly skilled athletes, everyone in the team can catch and pass a ball. But it’s hard to gel that team, to achieve that click.”Lessons from ChinaIt’s not a common word in sports terminology but stems from Taylor’s life in academia. The 26-year-old Australian was brought up in rural NSW, where he played rugby league before being introduced to union aged 13 at boarding school in Canberra. He studied social anthropology and Chinese Studies at Sydney University and has spent a lot of time in China. He speaks Mandarin and did a thesis called ‘Tackling rugby in China’, an analysis of what the game means to players there and what goes in at the human level.“I’m doing a masters now and part of it is trying to figure out the dynamics of cooperation and social bonding. Team dynamics. In the pro environment the level of analysis behind performance is thorough. A rugby player is classed as a rugby player but that’s too surface level. There’s a diversity of talents and personalities within a team, they’re not rugby robots. Treating a rugby player as a human being, and enabling that emotional health and energy to flourish in a meaningful way, is at the heart of all great sides.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Full-back Taylor will be the sixth Australian skipper in 12 seasons at Oxford, following Brett Robinson (2001), John Allen (2003), David Lubans (2004), Joe Roff (2007) and Nick Haydon (2010). Two years ago he was vice-captain of the Australian sevens team, with whom he played for more than three years before taking a break from rugby last year.A foot fracture delayed his start to this season, but he went on the pre-season tour to Russia, where Oxford beat St Petersburg University 83-3 and RC Slava 42-5.“The tour was part of our journey and one of the most crucial steps. It was purely a rugby team focus so was an incredible opportunity to create energy within the team without other distractions,” says Taylor, who, with Cambridge captain Harry Peck, talks about the Varsity Match build-up in our video below.“We saw two great cities in St Petersburg and Moscow and experienced the cultural diversity.St Petersburg was more of a training week but we were disappointed not to be tested more by Slava because they’re a pro side. But our hosts embraced the game of rugby, the camaraderie and sportsmanship. The people-to-people interaction was special, especially given such antagonism on an international relations level. Rugby offers a unique platform to connect as humans.”Returning BluesSaracens’ Charlie Hodgson, Wasps’ Kearnan Myall and Hartpury College’s Wayne Thompson help Oxford with coaching, under director of coaching James Wade, and the Dark Blues have plenty of on-field Varsity experience at their disposal. It includes the front row that set the platform for last year’s victory, with Ian Williams, Nick Gardner and Lewis Anderson playing havoc with the Cambridge scrum – two tries came directly from Oxford’s dominance.“Lewis has played in four Varsity Matches, Nick is going into his third and Ian (one Blue) trained with London Welsh over the summer and is fit, strong and mentally in a very positive place. But it would be naïve to think we can bank on the same dominance as we had last year. Reading too much into what has gone before is dangerous. All four of our previous wins were created in unique and one-off circumstances.”This year’s Varsity Match is dedicated to the 55 Blues who fell in World War One. Two of that number, Reginald Hands and Stephen Steyn, were pioneers of the scholarship system set up in 1903 under the will of Cecil Rhodes. A century on, Taylor is a Rhodes scholar himself and the commemoration to fallen heroes merely adds to the honour he feels at being asked to lead out the Oxford side.“One of the defining metaphors for the current Oxford University team is to try to replicate the spirit of the Army in all we do. It will be a privilege to pay our respects to the 55 Blues who gave their lives.”center_img A surfing fright lay behind the Dark Blues’ victory last year and the new skipper, Jacob Taylor is hoping for more of the same ahead of the Twickenham showdown For more on the Varsity Match commemoration, watch the video below. The match takes place on Thursday 11 December, 2.30pm kick-off. Tickets cost from £26 and are available from ticketmaster.co.uk.last_img read more

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first_imgAll eight fields of Estádio Universitário de Lisboa were reserved only for rugby, kicking football teams out for two full days. After the first day, we knew who was here to not only participate but to win the main cup.Turf war: CDUL and Cascais produced an absorbing U17 final, with CDUL edging it 8-3 (João Peleteiro)The tournament had a special guest, as former All Black Xavier Rush came to Portugal in his capacity as co-coach of Crawshays.In the U13 group, CF OsBelenenses, one of Portugal’s oldest rugby clubs, took home the main trophy after beating AIS Agronomia (2-1).Bristol took the U15 championship with a narrow (14-10) win against CDUL, who gained solace by bagging the U17 title against GDS Cascais (8-3) in a thrilling game played in heavy rain. The weather certainly didn’t ‘play ball’ over the weekend.As for the grand champions, hats off to Crawshays Youth, who defeated Myerscough College 31-0 to take the main honour. Crawshays centre Ellis Jones was rated Most Valuable Player for the U19 group, with Leo Wallaert (Belenenses) taking the U13 award, Bristol’s Ethan Gaynor the U15 award, and Diogo Cardoso of CDUL the U17 award.Welsh class: Crawshays Youth took the U19 title in some style (Carlos Rodrigues/Move Sports)During a tough time for Portuguese rugby, with the senior squad having just been relegated to the third division of European rugby, the Rugby Youth Festival gave the host country a timely tonic. Here again was the spirit that so impressed the world back at RWC 2007, and the only hope now is that more countries can take part – the French, Italian and Pacific teams that came last year were missed. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Going for glory: A Guerreiros player heads for the line during the U13 event (João Peleteiro Photography) If you would like to be at the ninth edition of Portugal’s Rugby Youth Festival, contact www.movesports.com or for more info on the tournament see www.portugalrugbyfestival.comFor the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.center_img Hello, hola, olá, bonjour – this is the Rugby Youth Festival. About 2,000 players representing 80 teams met in Lisbon last weekend to play 300 matches in a tournament organised by Move Sports, a sports operator and event manager. Between players, staff, families and friends, the two-day competition attracted 18,000 spectators yet rugby wasn’t the biggest part of the weekend… what was, you might ask?The exchange of information, experience and contacts between players from different parts of the globe. As usual the UK attended in force, with entrants including Crawshays Youth RFC (‘home’ for the likes of Dan Lydiate and Luke Charteris), Bristol Rugby and Myerscough College. The UK colleges and rugby academies are among the festival’s greatest enthusiasts, as in the past eight editions there have been more than six teams annually from Great Britain and Ireland.Slipping by: The ball eludes Cascais and Direito’s lineout forwards in the U15 competition (João Peleteiro)For Portugal, this festival is a very big deal, especially as rugby is still a relatively minor sport and almost exclusively amateur. It’s one of those rare opportunities for Portuguese teams to feel the pulse of international rugby, offering young players a platform to show their repertoire of skills. For the coaches it’s a moment to fine-tune their squads for the last throes of the rugby season.The international dimension is what makes the weekend so special. For example, in the U17 category, you could see VRAC from Spain, Lancashire’s Myerscough College and Dublin’s Liberty Saints facing Portuguese teams like GD Direito (whose senior squad played in this season’s Challenge Cup play-offs), CF OsBelenenses, CDUL or Agronomia.Plenty of dash: Bristol narrowly overcame CDUL from the host city to take the U15 crown (João Peleteiro)As for the staff members, this is a massive challenge because they have to prepare their players to face the best (and biggest) opposition they will face all year.And the organisation of the biggest rugby event in the Iberian Peninsula got a big thumbs-up, Henley College coach Pete Glackin expressing the satisfaction of many when he said: “It was an amazing day. This was our second time here; last year we won the Silver Cup, and today was a top day. Competition was good between teams, we had to play our best to top them.”Each team was placed in a group on the first day, with the teams separated into U13, U15, U17 and U19 categories. The U13s played ten-a-side; the U15s played 13-a-side (no flankers); and the U17s and U19s played the full 15-a-side. On the Saturday games were 20 minutes in duration before longer matches for the finals on the Sunday. Bristol and Crawshays Youth were among the winners at the biggest rugby event in the Iberian Peninsula. Francisco Isaac reports on the thrills and spills from Lisbonlast_img read more

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first_img Wales put their Twickenham nightmare behind them at the Principality Stadium, running in nine tries to secure a record win and condemn Italy to the wooden spoon in this year’s Six Nations. There was no slow start this time as Wales attacked in waves from the off and led 27-0 at half-time. George North was deservedly Man of the Match, showing a real sharpness in his running game, but there were threats across the park for Wales. Italy scored two second-half ties, through Guglielmo Palazzani and Gonzalo Garcia, but by that point they were well on the road to a heavy defeat. Warren Gatland’s side were happy to take risks in this game – the question now is whether they will play the same, more open style in New Zealand in the summer.WHAT’S HOT…Sense of adventure – Wales were embarrassed for an hour at Twickenham last week and they clearly had a few points to prove. There was nothing conservative about Wales’ attack in this match, offloads flying from all directions (George North’s back-handed one for Jamie Roberts’s second-half try was a beauty) and the hosts even launching attacks from their own 22. One such move resulted in a well-worked first-half try for Jonathan Davies as Wales had spotted the space out wide while after the break George North scythed his way through Italy’s defence from his own half. Rhys Webb, Dan Biggar, Liam Williams, Ross Moriarty (two) and Gareth Davies were the others who crossed the whitewash.Opening act: Rhys Webb crashes over to score Wales’ first try. Photo: Getty ImagesThere was far more freedom to their play as they looked to keep the ball in hand and spread it wide, rather than rely on their aerial kicking game to generate scoring opportunities. It wasn’t perfect – there were more than a few dropped passes and question marks of a forward pass in the build-up to Biggar’s try – but it was refreshing to see more ambition in their play. If they are to have any chance of winning a Test in New Zealand in June they need to show this sort of variety in their tactics rather than the continual use of multiple up-and-unders and hard runners.The crowd – This may have been a dead rubber in terms of the title, what with it being decided a week earlier by Scotland’s win over France, but the packed Millennium Stadium was a riot of colour. Alongside the large swathes of red were plenty of Italian fans, the ones in front of the press box with curly wigs emblazoned with the colours of the Italy flag particular favourites. They were all in fine voice and delivered a fantastic atmosphere to what had become more of a low-key occasion.Happy day: Jonathan Davies celebrates – as did the crowd throughout. Photo: Getty ImagesDavid Odiete – The full-back was the one shining light for Italy in Cardiff. He may be slight but he’s a dangerous runner, stood up well in defence and stepped in at scrum-half when Guglielmo Palazzani was sent to the sin-bin in the first half. He almost notched a length-of-the-field score, too, but despite touching down, play was brought back for a Wales penalty inside Italy’s 22.WHAT’S NOT…Italy – There was little expected of Italy before the tournament but the narrow defeat by France in round one raised a little hope. Their final two games of this Six Nations have extinguished all of those glimmers, though. Hammered by Ireland last week and Wales this, it looks like Italian rugby needs an overhaul – and fast. Jacques Brunel’s reign is now over and should, as expected, Conor O’Shea be named their new coach, he will under no illusions as to the task that lies ahead.Yes, Italy have been hampered by injuries in this tournament and there do have talented players; Gonzalo Garcia, Edoardo Gori and Michele Campagnaro have shown ambition in attack during the championship and, of course, there are the unwavering abilities of Sergio Parisse. But their discipline must improve and they still need to find a fly-half who can consistently deliver at Test level. There’s much work ahead for the Azzurri.Consolation try: Gonzalo Garcia touches down for Italy. Photo: Getty ImagesLack of a play-off – Following on from the Italy point, the Six Nations organisers must seriously consider opening up the championship to the likes of Georgia and Romania. This is not just simply being raised because Italy are propping up the table – similar questions have been raised when Scotland or Wales have been struggling in previous years. If rugby is truly committed to growing the sport, there has to be something for the lower-tier nations to aspire to.Straight promotion-relegation might be too big a step for now, but surely a play-off between the bottom-placed Six Nations team and the winners of the European Nations Cup (ENC) is a good option? Georgia beat Romania 38-9 today to claim Europe’s second-tier competition in front of a 50,000 crowd in Tbilisi. Add in their RWC 2015 performances and they could give Italy a run for their money. There are complications as the ENC competition runs over two years not one, but simply starting the process of opening up the tournament to other teams would be a step in the right direction.Leading figure: Do Sergio Parisse’s Italy deserve to keep their Six Nations place? Photo: Getty ImagesSTATISTICS17 – The number of carries made by Jamie Roberts, nearly double Italy’s top carriers. Tommaso Allan and Oliviero Fabiani made nine each. High five: George North of Wales breaks to score his team’s fifth try. Photo: Getty Images TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 143 – The number of metres made by George North, the only player to make it to three figures.12 – The number of line breaks made by Wales compared to three by Italy. 25 – The number of offloads made by Wales compared to eight by Italy.Wales: L Williams; G North, J Davies, J Roberts, H Amos (G Anscombe 49); D Biggar (R Priestland 59), R Webb (G Davies 64); R Evans (G Jenkins 51), S Baldwin (K Owens 51), S Lee (A Jarvis 59), B Davies (J Ball 59), L Charteris, D Lydiate (capt), J Tipuric (R Moriarty 17), T Faletau.Tries: Webb, Biggar, J Davies, Roberts, North, Williams, Moriarty 2, G Davies. Cons: Biggar 5, Priestland 3. Pens: Biggar 2.Italy: D Odiete; L Sarto, A Pratichetti (K Haimona 36), G Garcia, M Bellini (L McLean 34); T Allan, G Palazzani (A Lucchese 65); A Lovotti (M Zanusso 65), D Giazzon (O Fabiani 47), M Castrogiovanni (D Chistolini 47), Q Geldenhuys, V Bernabo (J Sarto 47), F Minto (A Steyn 59), A Zanni, S Parisse (capt).Tries: Palazzani, Garcia. Cons: Haimona 2.Yellow card: Palazzani (19min)Referee: Romain Poite (France)Man of the Match: George North (Wales) Attendance: 74,000For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. A round-up of what’s hot and what’s not from Wales’ final Six Nations game of 2016 against Italy in Cardiff last_img read more

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first_img Too many changesIf I was in charge of the playlist at the Millennium Stadium yesterday, I would have found it nigh on impossible not to slip Bowie’s ‘Changes’ on during the pre-match show. With 14 changes in personnel, 15 if you include Liam Williams’ move to fullback, and a complete overall of the team’s tactics, a fluid performance always looked unlikely. Other than the impressive Rhys Priestland and Rhys Webb, not one of the front row, lock, backrow, centre or back three combinations had played together before. And it showed. There were on occasions some fluid moves through the backline, and it is worth remembering that Wales had two tries disallowed, but on the whole Wales struggled in most aspects of the game.Arm-wrestle: Wales v Georgia was an unedifying spectacleWhilst changes to the backline made sense, radical changes to the front five row did not. Georgia are a team that consists of a scrum and a goalkicker, and if you can nullify their scrum you have them beat, yet it was in this area that Wales’ deficiencies were most visibly exposed, with the Welsh pack regularly looking like they had been fed through a car crusher. But despite the poor performance, at least they managed to avoid the sort of defeat that can blight a player’s career. Every player has a career win for which they are most remembered and equally, a career loss. This was very nearly another Western Samoa or Romania for some players – the stench of which would be hard to shift.Rhys Priestland is backFor many in Wales, Rhys Priestland can once again be talked about in the present tense. Although he hadn’t retired from Test rugby, some viewed his move to Bath as the end of his international career. But as anyone who has being watching Priestland at Bath will know, he has been quietly doing the business for the last 18 months. As indeed he did against Georgia. His line-kicking was assured, his passing rapid yet sympathetic and his defence robust – he was the joint top tackler in the backline with seven.Composed: There were several positives to Rhys Priestland’s international returnBut perhaps the most impressive aspect of his performance was his goal kicking. Priestland is a confidence player and when it drops, so too does his goal kicking completion. That was not the case against Georgia, which was made all the more impressive by the fact that his composed performance came amidst, what could have been, an embarrassing defeat. Well played Rhys P.Prop swopProps have long been associated with ‘dark arts’. A selection of poking and prodding antics which which wouldn’t look out of place in a medieval torture chamber. But not satisfied with the hidden dark arts, props are now knowingly or unknowingly involved in a more visible form of skulduggery – passive scrums. During the final minutes of the game against Georgia, Tomas Francis was yellow carded for illegal entry at a ruck – which officially registered a solid 9.8 on the daft-o-meter. During the following minutes, it was adjudged that Leon Brown was unfit to return thereby rendering all scrums from that point as passive – a situation which clearly benefitted Wales at the time. Breakaway: Rhys Webb makes one of the few line-breaks against Georgia LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Not clever: Tomas Francis’ yellow card put Wales in an awkward positionAnecdotally, Brown could be seen warming up on the side-line, ready to come on, but post-match the Welsh coaches made it clear that Brown was unable to return. Whether he was or wasn’t can never be proven, but what can be done is to make it clearer that a player is injured and unable to return to the field of play when they leave, not 20 minutes later, in the heat of the battle, where circumstances can be manipulated to meet a certain outcome. World Rugby need to take a look at this issue before it rears its ugly head in a high-profile game where the outcome will be far more serious.Georgia are good enoughSaturday was the first time that Wales and Georgia have played each other and hopefully it won’t be the last. Armed with a Tier 1 set-piece and goal-kicker they are more than capable of competing with the lower half of Tier 1 nations and with another five to ten years of development, certainly wouldn’t look out of place in an extended Six Nations. You need only look at their core statistics against Wales to see that they are a competent professional outfit.In control: Georgia proved they could compete at the top table of European rugbyThey had 57% of the possession and 56% of the territory – in the second half those numbers swelled to 70% and 75%. Georgia made more line breaks and beat more defenders than Wales. They had near perfect set-piece completion, 100% goal-kicking and turned their own possession over three times less than Wales. Georgia are a real asset and present a great opportunity to grow the game. We should do all that we can to help achieve that.Wales missed their backrow balanceWhilst the scrum issues will have worried the Welsh coaches the most, the problems at the breakdown will probably be next at the list. In all the talk of expansive rugby, a backrow forwards first job is the breakdown and not only to muck up the oppositions ball, but to clean up your possession on the ground. Wales’ ruck speed was very slow on occasions against Georgia and allowed the Georgian’s line speed to cause problems in midfield.center_img Imbalance: Wales did well at the lineout but their backrow balance was off-kilterIt was to be expected. Changing your entire backrow will obviously lead to problems. Other than your halfbacks, no other combination on the field is required to work as closely with each other as the backrow. Josh Navidi and Dan Lydiate both had solid individual performances – Lydiate made 24 tackles for instance – but solid individual performances won’t be enough against New Zealand and that’s a fact. Wales shuffled the pack too vigorously, Rhys Priestland made a welcome return to Test rugby and it was a shambolic end to a poor test. All are covered…last_img read more

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first_img“We live in turbulent times. The last thing rugby should do is to assume this is a blip and things will return to normal.”Of course, the Six Nations provides sublime entertainment. Unions have done well out of it all too. And according to one Six Nations insider, there is a sense of excitement rippling through the board as a new CEO, Ben Morel – who has extensive experience working with the NBA – takes over. Top of his agenda is innovation and reaching new markets.Some things won’t change, though, as our insider says: “There is absolutely no sign of changing promotion-relegation in the future. Why would teams put around £16-£17m (of profit) each at risk?” Morel confirms with us that the issue is not currently on Six Nations’ agenda.Morel tells Rugby World: “Our greatest opportunity is to expand our audience.“We’re already building on strong foundations but at a global level there’s a significant amount of untapped opportunity to be talking to the world about its best rugby championship.Closed off: No chance of promotion-relegation, as it stands (Getty Images)“Expanding the global coverage and audience is going to be paramount for me. Domestically, I want to expand the audience as well, with a clear focus on the younger generation. So through digital and social engagements, gaming and other things we can do with that.“The sponsorship world is evolving. The time when you sell purely inventory boards is gone. You need to adapt and innovate. That’s where digital and social (media) creates humongous opportunity and coverage on a global level, instantly. So sponsored content is one of the untapped opportunities for the Six Nations, given its popularity around the world but also in home markets.”While these words will relieve some who watched the slide in sponsorship value, there will be other battles. In a few years we will wonder what to do about TV rights.The current deal with BBC and ITV ends in 2021. Last year ITV’s audience peaked at 8.39m during England v Wales (sic: some 8.9m watched Wales v England in BBC One this season). Alone, BBC Wales pulled in 828,000 for Wales v Scotland and near 800,000 for Scotland v France last term.No one has teamed up with China’s state-run channels to air the Six Nations yet – something the NBA did in the Nineties – while sources close to South Africa’s SuperSport say their Six Nations ratings have been “underwhelming” of late.Subscription streaming platform DAZN hold the rights to broadcast in Canada, Germany, Switzerland and Austria until 2021. DAZN would not comment when asked about future rights tenders.Mobile experience: Streaming, social media and new technologies are high on the 6N agenda (Getty Images)“We are a free-to-air proposition and that defines the values of the Six Nations,” says Morel of future deals.“Actually, instead of free-to-air I prefer ‘free-to-view’. More and more of our fans, especially the younger generation, stream the games already on our existing broadcaster platforms.“The capability of driving high-quality content through digital and social platforms to engage the younger generation will be paramount, as well as some of the new initiatives like virtual reality and eSports. I’d love the Six Nations to have a leading voice there.”There are new markets out there and fresh ways to reach them. However lucrative that will be, wherever they take the ‘product’, it will certainly be a long way from the baggy shirts of 2000.Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Special Report: The Changing Face of the Six NationsTwenty years ago, before the first-ever Six Nations in 2000, we had qualms. Could this new competition ever be as good as the five-team tournament it was replacing?Then, in their competitive debut, Italy shocked Scotland. The Scots would also stun Grand Slam-chasing England. Brian O’Driscoll announced himself on the big stage with a hat-trick against France. Shane Williams broke opposition hearts for the first time. Martin Johnson ended up not featuring at all for England.The shirts were baggy, the hair was bad and Grandstand was still on the telly. But like the winds, things would change. Many want even more changes.We may look back at 2000 and sigh at how simple a lot of it still was. Italy’s players reputedly got no fee for playing then; Scotland’s starters, we’re told by a source, got around £2,500 to play and half as much again if they won. As we jump into the 2019 Six Nations, England’s stars can get up to £25k a game and can invoice for a further £9k on image rights each season.As shirts got tighter and training ground tech evolved in the last two decades, so has the rugby. Scrums and defences have changed beyond recognition. Styles in attack have mutated over generations. For example, France went from kings of joue to sultans of stodge. Every team has changed philosophy at least once.Look at the average match statistics from the table above. You can track changes in attack over the last decade. It suggest that adventure slid towards 2013, which is considered a nadir for attacks. But the numbers climb again in terms of runs, breaks and passes after 2013. The figures suggest that fans are now getting more marauding rugby.However, there are those that suggest 2013 was a bad year for the Six Nations in a more commercially significant way.Rugby World understands that in the wake of the 2013 Lions tour, banking powerhouse HSBC presented the Six Nations – who are intrinsically tied to the Lions – a proposal to sponsor the touring side for 12 years and the Six Nations for eight. The money, it is believed, was slightly less than Royal Bank of Scotland were paying to attach their name to the tournament at the time. But according to some in the sponsorship world, the bank’s extra budget for advertising or marketing increased the deal’s significance, particularly with its long-term nature.So confident were HSBC that the deal was wrapped up that they flew in their CEO for a big meeting – a rarity. When the Six Nations rejected that proposal, there was “shock and awe” in the room, according to one insider.In the years since, the sponsorship market has changed greatly. In 2017, after RBS ended their 14-year dalliance with the Six Nations, a lofty price tag was put on the competition. Potential sponsors balked, and the 2018 edition of the tournament was reportedly sponsored by RBS-owned NatWest for a knock-down price of £11m.This season sees the start of a six-year deal with Guinness, with just £6m being spent on the first year (though that cost is set to steadily rise each year throughout the agreement).Before this deal, it was reported that HSBC were again interested in sponsoring the event. This has been denied, with a spokesperson telling us: “I can confirm there was no conversation with the Six Nations whatsoever. Over recent years we have turned to sevens and that is our vehicle, our focus, and the game fits with the values of HSBC perfectly.”According to Simon Chadwick, professor of Sports Enterprise at Salford University, traditional rugby ventures are at a “crossroads” with the sponsorship landscape shifting under rugby’s feet.“I think the market has changed,” he says. “The Six Nations is out of kilter with the needs and wants of millennials and Generation X consumers. Rugby is not alone as football and Formula One are just two other sports struggling to get to grips with this change. However, there is something about the nature and format of rugby union, about the sport’s socio-cultural underpinnings, and about its image and reputation that is a bit of a turn-off for younger consumers. We’ve come a long way since 2000 but with fluctuations in sponsorship value and broadcast battles to come as tech improves, what does the future hold? 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first_imgIn an exclusive interview for Rugby World‘s 60th anniversary issue, Gatland spoke to Tom English about learning lessons, touring South Africa and the Lions. Read it in full here…Warren Gatland was 34 years old when he first coached against the Springboks, an experience that taught him much and still tickles him plenty, despite the severity of what happened to him back in 1998 when he was in charge of a lowly Ireland against the steepling world champions.The Kiwi was three Tests and three losses into his reign in Dublin at the time. In South Africa – where he returns next year as British & Irish Lions coach – Ireland had already lost tour games to South Western Districts Eagles, Western Province and Griquas (who beat the tourists 52-13) before the Test series. Two more losses later and Gatland was zero from five Internationals. A year later Ireland exited the World Cup at their earliest stage ever. Two years after that, he was sacked.From there to here. Rugby World readers have named Gatland, now in charge of the Chiefs, the greatest rugby coach ever, an accolade that he’s grateful for while also saying that the same thing could be done next month with a different answer. “I might not even make the quarter-final,” he says.Fronting up: The Lions will be tested by South Africa’s powerful pack next year (Getty Images)Given that the Lions are heading there in 2021, South Africa seems like a reasonable place to begin the story.“Was I ready for international rugby coaching at that point? I wasn’t,” reflects Gatland now. “Was I expecting to be in the role for a long time? I think I was the fifth Irish coach in the 1990s, so there was no security in the job. Even though we were well beaten in the Tests (37-13 in Bloemfontein and 33-0 in the infamous battle of Loftus Versfeld in Pretoria), what I loved about it was the character of the players. We didn’t give up.”After the on-field anarchy in Pretoria, Ireland tour manager Donal Lenihan was asked if he was citing any South African players. “Yes,” he replied, deadpan. “All of them.” The memory makes Gatland laugh. Those were tough days but they helped shape him, no doubt about it.“We lost the second Test by 33 points and we were leaving the hotel as the Welsh team were arriving and they had a bit of a giggle at our expense, then the following week they nearly had a hundred points put on them,” he says.“I learnt a lot on that tour. They had no respect for us because we hadn’t earned it. We turned up at a training session once and the gates were locked and we were sitting on the bus for 20 minutes waiting for the guy to turn up with the key. They didn’t care.“I toured there as a player with the All Blacks and that wouldn’t have happened to New Zealand and had it happened you would have had the players getting off the bus and kicking the gate down. I think that might have been something I was advocating at the time actually.“The difference between how they treated the All Blacks and how they treated Ireland was fascinating to me. They just looked down their noses at Ireland, so, yeah, we lost the Tests but the character we showed was a starting point. A lot of teams would have thrown the towel in, but we kept fighting until the end – literally.”Those early years in Ireland were incredibly instructive, sometimes in ways he only realised years later. “I look back on Munster and I think a lot of the values I have now came from watching them. Munster didn’t always have the best players but they had great character. When their guys put that jersey on, it really meant something to them.“It’s not always the most talented players you need, it’s the guys with the most heart. That’s been a big part of it for me. I’d rather pick a team of good blokes who would die for each other than superstars with egos who are just in it for themselves.“I think there’s a little bit of a football mentality in rugby in places. Clubs spending money on the big-name players whereas I’ve always felt you’re better off spending the money on the environment. Get that infrastructure right and worry about the players afterwards. I’d rather have an extra analyst, an extra conditioner, an extra coach, the right medical staff, the right facilities, proper food and nutrition than spending money on two or three quality players.“I suppose my values centre around family. That’s massive. I keep stressing it, whether it’s Wasps, Wales, the Lions or wherever I am. There are more important things than rugby. If things are right at home, then I get a player who gives me more in training. I’ve seen coaches completely mess those sorts of things up by not being flexible enough. A player needs a day off to go to a baby scan or a brother’s graduation or a parent’s birthday, whatever – give him the day off. If it’s important to him, do it, because you get so much more back from him when you do.” Red army: Lions supporters on the 2009 tour to South Africa (Getty Images)These are the man-management skills that have propelled him into the pantheon. European and domestic glory with Wasps, Grand Slams with Wales, back-to-back Lions tours, winning one and drawing the other. And next summer it goes full circle when Gatland returns to the place where his days as a touring coach started.He had two cracks at the Boks in their own backyard when he was in charge of Ireland and another four on the road when he was coaching Wales. The closest he got to victory – and it was painfully close – was 2014 when the Welsh lost two men to the sin-bin, gave up a 30-17 lead and got done 31-30.“We won it twice and lost it twice.”Related: 2021 British & Irish Lions schedule confirmedGatland says he hasn’t, and won’t, engage in the game of picking his Lions squad. “I’m too afraid to do it. It’ll only change a million times between now and then. Players will come out of nowhere, other players will really ramp it up because it’s a Lions year, there’ll be injuries.“I have no idea who the captain will be either. It’s about picking the squad and then saying who do we think will be captain material. Ideally, it’s somebody who has come from a team that’s been pretty successful. The next question is if we were picking the Test team now, is there a good chance this person would make that Test team?”Who, at this remove, are the nailed-on Test players, injury and form permitting? Owen Farrell, Jamie George, Maro Itoje, Billy Vunipola, Tom Curry? Itoje is the name that keeps cropping up.“You look at that and go, well, there are some pretty good second-rows around and he’s not bad. You have Courtney Lawes and George Kruis. How’s Alun Wyn Jones going at that time? There’s James Ryan. There’s no doubt about Itoje’s quality. He’s an intelligent player and an intelligent man and has been incredibly successful in his career. He would definitely be in contention as one of the possibilities as captain.”Front-runner: Maro Itoje makes a break for England (Getty Images)The coronavirus has changed a few things around announcements, he says. “The plan was to start talking to back-room coaching staff during the November window and then make an announcement in early December. We’ll see how that goes now. I need to go around the CEOs of the national teams and ask them if they’d prefer that we didn’t approach a coach in their set-up.“There were one or two last time in New Zealand that we made inquiries about and who subsequently weren’t available. I have to make sure we don’t end up in that situation again. Gregor (Townsend) was one of them. He’d have loved the opportunity to go. Personally, I think it would have been great for him, but he was just appointed as Scotland coach and it was a little contentious because he was replacing Vern Cotter, who had done well.“Maybe Gregor reassessed the situation and thought it better that he went on tour with Scotland. I understand that. I don’t want to be in that situation again where we’ve had a conversation and somebody is initially keen and then it doesn’t happen.”He’ll take a smaller squad this time around. He reckons 36 or 37 players should be enough and controversy is guaranteed. He’s had his share of it. The Brian O’Driscoll affair in 2013 was followed by uproar and ludicrous allegations of anti-Scottishness in 2017 when he picked just two Scots.“Look, I’m a great believer that the Lions have to represent four nations. I kept going back to their performance at Twickenham that season. I’m not saying they needed to win that game but they needed to be a lot closer than a 50-pointer. That stuck in my mind.“I remember selecting the team and we only had a couple of Scottish players – Stuart Hogg and Tommy Seymour – and the other coaches came to me and said, ‘Can we revisit the wing selection?’ and I said, ‘No, we can’t, we’ve only got two Scots and we cannot go down to one. We’re going to get absolutely crucified as it is’. That wasn’t easy but you have to do what you think is right.”Top two: Ian McGeechan and Warren Gatland worked together on the 2009 Lions tour (Getty Images)He was Ian McGeechan’s assistant in 2009 (only the second time in his career he’s been a number two) and head coach in 2013 and 2017. Why go again given the New Zealand tour was so hard?“The last one was disappointing. I had this romantic view of the Lions, coached by a New Zealander, going back to New Zealand. Let’s celebrate that. And it was celebrated by most people, to be fair, but sections of the New Zealand media were incredibly hostile and personal about me. That took me by surprise.“What was written by that element of the press wasn’t what we experienced in New Zealand. The hospitality was incredible, the atmosphere was electric. I had a huge amount of Kiwis getting in touch with me afterwards to say they were embarrassed by how I was treated by elements of the New Zealand media.“But you reflect over time, don’t you? You come back to Wales, do pretty well, the negatives diminish and you get the buzz for it again. I wouldn’t have forgiven myself had I turned it down. I feel hugely privileged to have the opportunity again. The Lions concept is special and it’s a massive fight to preserve it.”Everybody says they love the Lions but not everybody is of a mind to give them the best chance to succeed. We’re talking about the vexed problem of preparation time now.“We all love the Lions but there’s an element in the UK, with certain club owners and PRL (Premiership Rugby), that I find strange. There’s surely nothing better than a player from your club being selected for the Lions. They go away, they win a series, they return as superstars that all the young fans will look up to. Isn’t that what it’s all about? You create heroes for the next generation.“What Pro14 have done next season is brilliant. They’ve moved their final to give us two weeks’ preparation. So thanks so much to Pro14 and the Celtic nations for doing that. It’s a generous thing to do.“I mean, 2017 was incredibly tough. Two finals on the Saturday, assemble on the Sunday, fly to New Zealand on the Monday, arrive Wednesday and play Saturday. It makes it really difficult.“I remember the 2001 and 2005 tours, people were talking whether this was the end of the Lions. My first involvement, with Geech, was about putting respect back in the jersey and we’ve done it, but it’s so easy to lose it again.”Next year a Lions squad will be picked. Even the thought of the chosen ones facing the Boks quickens the pulse. “It’s just very, very special,” says Gatland, with a smile of anticipation, a knowing look from a man who’s been there, done it and is thrilled by the chance of doing it again. All smiles: Warren Gatland has been voted the greatest ever rugby coach (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Warren Gatland voted the greatest ever rugby coachThis year marks the 60th anniversary of Rugby World magazine and we want to reflect on the key movers and shakers in the sport over the past six decades.That includes determining the greatest ever rugby coach – and we asked you to help us do it.We created a ‘bracket’ listing the best of the best. Those in the running had to have coached at men’s international 15s level since 1960. Most were head coaches but we included a few assistants because of their impact.The votes of Rugby World readers on Twitter then decided the winners of 31 head-to-head polls – see below – with Warren Gatland beating Ian McGeechan in the final to be crowned the greatest ever rugby coach.Gatland’s CV is hugely impressive. At Wasps, he won three successive English Premiership titles as well as the Heinken Cup and European Challenge Cup.He won three Six Nations Grand Slams as Wales coach and guided the British & Irish Lions to a series win in Australia in 2013 – the tourists’ first triumph in 16 years – as well as a drawn series in New Zealand in 2017. Next year he will take charge of the Lions for a third time as they travel to South Africa to face the world champions. The New Zealander talks to Rugby World about learning lessons, touring South Africa and the Lions in an exclusive interviewlast_img read more

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first_img Rector Albany, NY School offers counseling as details of shooter’s life emerge Teacher appeared troubled in days before he killed former boss, self This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 7, 2012 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Adrian A. Amaya+ says: Comments (4) Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Comments are closed. March 8, 2012 at 8:03 pm Nice article. Touching in its simplicity. Sorry for the tragedy. My prayers go out to those who died and to the faculty and students and families of the school. We do live in a small world. My cousins attended the school and loved every minute of it.St. Luke’s Church, Long Beach CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Gun Violence Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Dave Hall says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC March 7, 2012 at 8:50 pm So very sorry to hear of this tragedy. Prayers for all involved and/ or impacted.(The Rev.) Bill KolbMemPhis TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Rev. Mary Frances Curns says: Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing March 8, 2012 at 7:18 am St. Mark the Evangelist Episcopal Church; Syracuse, New York will be lifting up you by name in our celebrations of the Holy Eucharist this Sunday. God’s blessing and comfort be with you all.The Rev. Adrian A. Amaya, RectorSt. Mark the Evangelist Episcopal ChurchSyracuse, New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL William Kolb says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY March 7, 2012 at 9:25 pm We here at St. Anne’s Episcopal Church and Day School in Jacksonville, NC are holding everyone in prayer!The Rev. Mary Frances Curns, RectorSt. Anne’s Episcopal Church and Day SchoolJacksonville, NC Flowers are placed at the entrance to Episcopal High School in Jacksonville, Fla. Wednesday, March 7, 2012, the day after the head of school, Dale Regan, was gunned down by a teacher who had been fired. The school will remain closed through next week’s spring break. (AP Photo/The Florida Times-Union, Will Dickey)[Episcopal News Service] In the wake of the March 6 murder-suicide at Episcopal School of Jacksonville, Florida, officials have opened the campus to students, faculty and staff seeking counseling and comfort.A public memorial service for slain Head of School Dale Regan is planned at 11 a.m. March 9 in the school’s Campion Courtyard between Parks and Lastinger Halls, two classroom buildings whose construction she oversaw two years ago. There will be a public viewing at a local funeral home the evening prior.Regan, 63, died hours after she had been involved in firing Shane Schumerth, 28, a Spanish teacher at the school. He returned to campus with an AK-47 in a guitar case, went to her office and shot Regan several times before killing himself, according to the Jacksonville Sheriff’s office.Regan had been at Episcopal for 34 years, teaching English before she became head of school.“Dale has devoted her entire life to this school as a teacher and administrator,” said Rob Clements, chairman of the school’s board of trustees, and the Very Rev. Kate Moorehead, dean of St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral in Jacksonville and trustee vice-chair, in a statement on the school’s website.“Without Dale’s determination and passion for students and teaching, where Parks and Lastinger Halls now stand would just be empty space. Instead, the future of Episcopal and excellence in teaching and learning stands supported by brick and white columns, but more importantly, it houses new ways of learning, technology for today’s student, and an environment that challenges teachers to be their best,” they said.Moorehead, in a telephone interview with Episcopal News Service March 7, said that Regan “had a wonderful combination of gentleness, wisdom and fortitude; she was a very strong woman and a visionary, but also could be a counselor.”Florida officials and citizens, many of them Episcopal alumni, immediately issued statements about the shooting and posted tributes on news websites, blogs and Twitter, as well as on the school’s Facebook page.“She could help you before you even knew what your unique gifts were, because she did,” Doug Walker, executive director of the Diocese of Florida Foundation, who worked with Regan when he served as the school’s director of institutional advancement, told the Times-Union.Students pray after putting flowers at the entrance to Episcopal High School in Jacksonville, Fla. Wednesday, March 7, 2012, the day after the head of school, Dale Regan, was gunned down by a teacher who had been fired. The school will remain closed through next week’s spring break. (AP Photo/The Florida Times-Union, Will Dickey)Among a number of prayer services held in the hours after the shootings, one at the cathedral was based on Night Prayer from the New Zealand Prayer Book. “We felt as if she was somehow with us as we said those words because she used to read them herself before bedtime,” Moorehead told ENS.Hundreds of teenagers and their parents participated. “We had a full cathedral,” Moorehead said. “Lots of candles, lots of tears.”Schumerth was hired by Episcopal in August 2010. He graduated in 2007 from Purdue University with a B.A. in Spanish and had taught Spanish to students of all ages, including an immersion program to eighth graders, the school said at the time.Schumerth was teaching at John E. Ford K-8 Montessori/Spanish Immersion School in Jacksonville in April 2010 when he told the Times-Union that it was important for his students to learn debating skills. “As education is concerned, this is about as valuable a thing as you’re going to see,” he said. “Critical thinking skills, the ability to evaluate complicated issues – I noticed improvement in my classes and I noticed academic improvement in all four of the kids. That was neat to see.”The details of Schumerth’s dismissal have not been disclosed. The Florida Times-Union newspaper in Jacksonville reported that some of his students said Schumerth had recently been speaking of fascism and politics during his classes.Joanna Horton, in whose acting classes in emotional expression Schumerth took part, told the Times-Union that the teacher “wanted to relate to people better” and “really had trouble being in his own skin,” but she did not sense any malice.“He was desperate,” she said. “He tried everything. He just wanted to be happy.”Moorehead called Episcopal School an “extremely safe campus; really an oasis” and a “place of peacefulness, which makes it all the more shocking for our community.”“We expect there to be violence in certain places in our world but, there are other places that we work so hard to try ensure that they’re peaceful and even [there] there are times when we can’t avoid the brokenness of our world,” she continued.The dean asked the entire Episcopal Church to “pray for this school that it can rise up to be even more incredible than it was before. This feels like a huge blow to us but I know that out of the darkness comes the light so we’re looking for a wonderful future.”During a media briefing at the school a few hours after the shooting, Moorehead said that she hoped people would be able to pray for Schumerth.“I know that people go through many stages of grief and there will be a stage at which they may not feel that they can do that and that’s to be understood,” she told ENS the next day. “Eventually for us to let go and trust that God will somehow work with his soul. We just have to leave his salvation in God’s hands and ask for our own hearts that we will be able to forgive.”The Times-Union newspaper said it received an email from Steve Schumerth, Shane’s father, saying the family is in shock about the shooting and they “are deeply sorry this happened.”“We are in shock and grieve for the loss of our son, and for the family, friends and acquaintances of Headmaster Dale Regan,” Steve Schumerth of Culver, Indiana, said in response to a Times-Union inquiry. “Our prayers go up for them and the entire Episcopal School family. We are deeply sorry this happened.”His son, the oldest of five children, graduated in 2002 from Culver Academy, a private college preparatory school in Culver, where Steve Schumerth teaches in the leadership department.Moorehead will preach during the March 9 memorial service for Regan. “This is where the church is at its best,” she said. “We are able to step into these moments of great loss and death and dying and proclaim the resurrection. I pray that God will speak through me somehow both to comfort them but also to give them the assurance of the hope of everlasting life.”She said Regan would want that service to celebrate her life. “She was not a person who enjoyed long, drawn out liturgies of mourning,” Moorehead said. “That is not what she would want. She would want a celebration, so that’s what we intend to do.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Advocacy Peace & Justice, Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

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first_img General Convention, Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN General Convention 2012 Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Dianne Lowe says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted Jul 11, 2012 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC July 12, 2012 at 10:59 am Thanks to techonology we all have access to your wonderful sermon! Many thanks for your honesty, clarity and hope! [ooyala code=”k3OXhjNTrPssyxerv0CTqusJbqQ-aWDc”] [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The following sermon was presented July 11 by the Rev. Stephanie Spellers at the 77th General Convention of the Episcopal Church, meeting in Indianapolis IN through July 12.Pray Like You Mean ItHomily for Community Eucharist at the Episcopal General Convention (July 11, 2012)By the Rev. Stephanie Spellers(Sung) Spirit of the living God, fall fresh on me. Spirit of the living God, fall fresh on me.Melt me, mold me, fill me, use me. Spirit of the living God, fall fresh on me.If you want to know what Anglicans believe, hear how we pray. Well, we just prayed, “Give us grace, following the teaching and example of thy servant Benedict, to walk with loving and willing hearts in the school of the Lord’s service.” It’s a beautiful prayer. I sure hope we meant it.Benedict of Nursia came on the scene in 6th century Italy, when corruption had saturated the church. Even monastics were kind of doing their own thing, indistinguishable from the culture at large.Faith didn’t change anyone, and it didn’t cost you anything. It was like the man in this morning’s gospel, the one who decided one fine day, “I’m building a tower” – even though he had no idea what it cost, what sacrifice he would bear. In Benedict’s day, people took on the name Christian, but had zero interest in bearing the cross and being transformed into Jesus’ people. Imagine that.The Rev. Stephanie Spellers preaches at the convention Eucharist on July 11. Photo/Janet KawamotoBut Benedict wanted to be a Christian. He wanted Jesus to melt him, mold him, fill him and use him, and he wanted to be surrounded by companions who would hold and prod him through that change. So he founded a new monastic community, a “school for the Lord’s service” shaped by three commitments. They were – please join me in some Latin call and response – stabilitas, obedientia, conversatio morum. Let’s break it down:Stabilitas: is stability, or sticking with your community. Obedientia: obedience, obeying the authority of the community and of God. And finally the commitment toward which everything else pointed: conversatio morum. It’s an untranslatable phrase that means something like committing to this rule, bearing the cross, embracing The Other, and trusting that God is working this out, using all this to convert, confound, transform and ultimately bless you.That’s following the teaching and example of Benedict. Do we really mean to pray that?I’m a textbook Generation Xer, so I’ve never been much for stability, even less for obedience. Up to 12 years ago, I was still wandering from church to sangha to fellowship. And when I found this body, I found you. I found so much that I had longed for, and plenty I never would have asked for and now can’t imagine living without. A table where Jesus lives, not in memorium but incarnate. A liturgy that still vibrates with the rhythms of the ancient ordo. A theological tradition that makes sense to me here, here and here. A vowed life as a priest, obedient to the church’s and God’s calling.I love this church. It’s easily the longest committed relationship I have ever been in. My mom drove up last night from Kentucky, and I’m sure she’ll be standing at the back to thank all of you. The Episcopal Church has given me stabilitas and obedientia, and I know that my salvation depends on the conversion that God is working out in me right here with you. Thank you for that.But if my Baptist mama drove all this way; if you, my church family, have actually gotten up for the second to last Convention Eucharist, then I have to be honest and tell you the rest of the story.And what I have seen is, we love to pray these commitments, and we like to live them – as long as they don’t change us too much.Want to test that theory? Benedict would point to hospitality. In his Rule, he wrote: “Let all guests who arrive be received like Christ, for He is going to say, ‘I came as a guest, and you received Me.’” Benedict told his monks to offer prayers and praises when anyone arrives at the door, especially the poor and dishonored. Send the abbot, send the guest brother, send the whole community to bow and wash that guest’s feet.And when you do, he said, remember this: you’re not just blessing them. This discipline is about you: you moving out to meet The Other, you being humble and stretched, you being converted and blessed by God. If you’re truly rooted in Christ, if you’re obedient to his commandments, if you have surrendered to the mystery of conversatio morum, you will receive Christ as The Other, you will be changed.Throughout this Convention, we have prayed and proclaimed our desire to seek and serve Christ in all persons, to welcome emerging generations and cultures. Did we mean to pray that? Do we want the conversion that hospitality entails?I pray that we do. Because right now, here’s what our legendary welcome sounds like: “The Episcopal Church Welcomes You. We’re so glad you’re here! Now, this is the Book of Common Prayer. Obey it. This is our musical tradition. Master it. This is our English heritage. Adopt it. This is our sense of order. Assimilate it. And the gifts from your home culture, your young culture, your lower-class culture? Would you leave them at the door and pick them up on your way out? They’re not quite Episcopal enough.”I do not think we mean to be unkind or unwelcoming. I think we love what we have received and the most natural thing in the world is to share it with others in that very form. I think we are afraid that opening to two-way transformation with The Other could shatter or simply erase the foundations of our Episcopal identity.Benedict would say this is not so. To be Christian is to engage in a dance. To be Anglican is to engage in a dance. Stabilitas keeps us anchored, holding fast to what is holy and true. Conversatio morum makes us free to say, “Here is the way we have known Jesus. May this path bless you. How have you known him? What song sounds like God to you? What dream has the Spirit whispered to you in your ear? I am confused, I am scared. But I embrace this dying and rising, this sacrifice and blessing, this transformation into the fullness of Christ. And, I embrace you.”The prayer to be like Benedict will shatter our well-drawn boundaries, it breaks our hearts, it grows our capacity to love and to fail, and sends us humble as beggars into the arms of Jesus and the arms of the stranger. It is a dangerous prayer. Pray it anyway. And then watch out. God might just give you what you prayed for. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS July 17, 2012 at 3:34 pm As a person searching for an Episcopal church home, Rev. Spellers inspires me to thinik that the Episcopal Church is “dying” even while it is being reborn to meet the spiritual needs of the 21st century. Change is NECESSARY and REQUIRED or death will surely follow. Since Christ is the head of the Body, the Spirit of Christ will determine what changes are needed not our comfort zones or fondness of and security in tradition. If parish guests are giving feedback as to why they feel unwelcome, their concerns should be taken seriously. It is an opportunity to practice the radical hospitality that Christ modeled for us. Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 12, 2012 at 3:08 pm Rev Steph is a dear friend and my long-time Priest in Boston, and seeing her sermon up there at General Convention touched my heart. I am among many near and far who continue to keep the Rule of Life of the Crossing (Boston) community, which welcomed many of us into the Anglican tradition in new, ancient and beautiful ways. Kieran Conroy says: July 12, 2012 at 6:04 am Thank you, Rev. Spellers! I wish I had still been there to hear you preach these words in person. I’m glad I read it. I can relate with you, especially on this point: “The Episcopal Church has given me stabilitas and obedientia, and I know that my salvation depends on the conversion that God is working out in me right here with you. Thank you for that.” I am thankful that God brought me to the Episcopal Church! Jim Goodmann says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Barbara Nash says: Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Margaret Bullitt-Jonas says: July 11, 2012 at 9:51 pm What a powerful sermon. I wasn’t there to hear it, but I am glad to have found it online. Thank you, Stephanie, for your candid and challenging words. Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Marya DeCarlen says: Barbara Calvin says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments are closed. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Mary Crist says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ July 13, 2012 at 9:00 am This was a sermon monumental in its invitation – one that could be issued across all Christian churches, especially when they think of welcoming the next generation of leaders, the next generation of Church.Thanks, Stephanie. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA July 12, 2012 at 10:52 am Thank you for these inspiring words! I can’t wait to share them. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Stephanie Spellers preaches at convention Eucharist Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 11, 2012 at 2:15 pm Thank you for the inspiration this day. Michael Seewer says: Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA July 11, 2012 at 11:53 pm Your words are inspiring!!. I believe in your desire to use stability as an anchor that can move from place to place. You can lead this church we love into our capacity to grow and fail and grow again. Grounded in the ancient, interacting with the present, you will lead us. grateful for you, Marya Rector Belleville, IL Comments (9) Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

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first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY The School of Theology participates in Vanderbilt’s extern program Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Theological Education Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Posted Nov 26, 2012 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [The University of the South, Sewanee] The School of Theology, at the University of the South, is participating in an extern program for doctoral candidates from Vanderbilt University that allows them to teach in an area of their field while finishing their dissertations. In August, The School of Theology welcomed Brad Daugherty as a visiting instructor for the Advent and Easter semesters of 2012-2013.“The Vanderbilt externship program for doctoral students is a great gift to The School of Theology,” explained the Rt. Rev. Neil Alexander, dean of The School of Theology. “It is encouraging and stimulating to both faculty and students to welcome fine young scholars into our midst. They bring fresh energy to the work of theological education, well-honed skills from their doctoral studies, and a passion for teaching that our students find enlivening. We hope that we provide a context for these scholars to grow and mature as teachers and leaders in theological education.”Daugherty is completing a Ph.D. in historical studies in the graduate department of religion at Vanderbilt University. He is also a fellow in the Program in Theology and Practice, of which the externship is part. The program trains scholars across the theological disciplines who not only excel in their scholarly disciplines but are also teachers of people preparing for ministry. As a sort of capstone to the program, fellows are paired with institutions of theological education in an externship, giving fellows a chance to learn the craft of teaching for ministry, including aspects both in the classroom and beyond.During this Advent term, Daugherty is team teaching with a mentor, the Rev. Dr. Benjamin King, assistant professor of Church history and director of the Advanced Degrees Program. In the Easter term, Daugherty will teach a seminar on Augustine of Hippo and North African Christianity, two topics that feature prominently in his own research.“The combination of preparation in both an academic discipline and in teaching for ministry is rare in graduate programs; in fact, Vanderbilt was the only school that offered such a combination,” stated Daugherty. “I was attracted to Sewanee because of its clear commitment to preparing people for ministry in and to the church. It was evident that as an institution, The School of Theology had a clear sense both of its vocation and of how it was going to go about preparing people for ministry.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

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