first_imgThis Notre Dame junior will be competing on the Jeopardy! College Championship. Who is Olivia Colangelo? Tonight Colangelo, a junior engineering major from McGlinn Hall, will appear on the popular television quiz show for its college competition. Colangelo taped the show on Oct. 18 and 19 in Culver City, Calif. While taping is completed, she was not allowed to disclose the results of the competition. “It was actually not as nerve-wracking as I expected,” Colangelo said. “They have people who make sure you are not nervous and are having fun on television. They talk to you about things that are not Jeopardy! It did not feel like you were taping for a large studio audience.” Colangelo said her time spent as a student at Notre Dame had equipped her with the skills necessary for the experience of being on a televised game show. “I think for me, Notre Dame helped prepare me with coming here as a freshman. I was the only person from my high school which made me talk to people I did not know,” she said. “I think this helped in the auditions and when I got there.” She said one of the most rewarding aspects of her time on Jeopardy! was her fellow college-aged contestants. “You are put in a room with 15 other people, and the producer commented on how we hit it off,” Colangelo said. “We are all Facebook friends and we plan on talking to each other when the show is on the air.” Colangelo also said taping the show was exciting based on the location of the Jeopardy! set, which is located on the Sony Studio lot. “For me, one of the neatest things of the experience was we were on a film studio lot. The set was beautiful. Also, we got to eat lunch at the Sony commissary,” she said. “Some of the people competing even saw Brad Pitt.” Colangelo said one of the trickier aspects of participating on the show was preparing for the wide array of questions. “I tried to prepare mostly by watching the shows everyday,” she said. “Since it tests such a broad range of knowledge, it is hard to study anything specific.” Colangelo said she did study some specific material based on what subject areas she felt less comfortable with. “I tried to brush up on stuff I wasn’t as knowledgeable about or I haven’t encountered as an engineer, such as the plots of Shakespeare,” she said. Colangelo said participating on Jeopardy! has been a dream of hers for a long time. She said she was on an email list to try out for different versions of the show, including the College Championship. She took a 10-minute online quiz in the spring, which initiated her audition process. “They have an online test for all the shows they do,” Colangelo said. “I had known that I wanted to be on Jeopardy! for a while.” Overall, Colangelo said despite the impressive cash prizes available, which range from $5,000 to $100,000 for the winner, the experience of being on a game show itself is what she truly cherishes. “Going in, I thought about the money because $100,000 is a lot. But the first time I got on stage, I forgot about that because I love answering questions,” she said. “I realized the reason I originally wanted to be on was not the money, but the love of the concept of the show.”last_img read more

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first_imgIn  September, Velvet Canada, a graduate of Saint Mary’s Women’s Entrepreneurship Initiative (WEI) fourth SPARK program in South Bend, will open her own dance studio named DanceHipology, WEI director Martha Smith said. “Velvet was a student of our fourth session of SPARK,” Smith said. “She came to us with a lot of enthusiasm. From the very beginning it was obvious that she meant business, literally. She participated in all of the sessions and by the end of the program she had finished her business plan and was ready to go forth with her idea. Now, she is the first SPARK graduate to open a brick and mortar business.”  The eleven-week program SPARK is modeled after a San Francisco non-profit called the Women’s Initiative, Smith said. Both programs include intense training sessions on topics such as marketing, break-even points, mission statements, business plans, stress management, networking, record-keeping and loan information. “We learned about banking, met with bankers and realized it is not that hard to start a business,” Canada said. “I learned being an entrepreneur is really just time, effort and knowing the right people.”  Canada, who graduated with a Bachelors of Arts from Notre Dame in 2009, said she developed a passion for ballroom dancing while attending the University and has now been dancing for seven years. “I have been a professional dancer for three years now and I cannot wait to share my passion with the South Bend community,” Canada said. “I really just want to share this passion with others and get others to get out there, shake their booty and have fun.” Canada said for the past two to three years she has had a dream of opening a dance studio, and in December she decided to make this dream a reality. To move forward, Canada applied for the SPARK program. “My boss saw information about the SPARK program in the newspaper and thought I would be a great candidate,” Canada said. “Turns out I was and the program really lit a fire under what I wanted to do in terms of opening a business.” She said she is tailoring her studio toward hip-hop and ballroom dancing, but has several goals for the studio. “My goal is to have a kids group that can cultivate the culture of hip-hop and realize it is not a thug thing,” Canada said. “You can dance to hip-hop with classical music of the popular hits of today. I also want people to know ballroom dancing is not something that has to be danced … with stuffy symphony music. There are some cool songs you can dance [to for] ballroom.” Though tailored to these two types of dancing, Canada said her studio will offer a variety of different classes. “We are going to have all different types of classes,” Canada said. “If you want to learn moves that a motown back-up singer would have to know, we are going to have a class for that. We are also going to have Zumba and hip-hop workout classes for people of all ages. One of my teachers is trained in Tae Kwon Do and he will be teaching a Martial Arts dance class. There really will be a class for everyone.” Having been mentored by the SPARK program, Canada said she is looking forward to giving back to South Bend community and paying her mentoring skills forward. “I came to this city seven years ago and can honestly say I have fallen in love with South Bend,” Canada said. “This city has a lot of talent and I would love to help dancers in anyway possible. Whether that is helping anyone that has a goal of being a successful dancer or someone that would like to open her own studio, I would like to offer my skills and experience.” Canada said she is thankful to the SPARK program for giving her the extra boost of confidence to start her own studio. “I have recommended others to do the SPARK program and will continue to do so,” Canada said. Smith said SPARK represents an organization of community members investing in women who will eventually give back to the greater South Bend community.  “Thanks to the financial support of KeyBank, 1st Source Bank, PNC Bank, NIPSCO, The Pokagon Fund, the involvement of dedicated community facilitators and SCORE volunteers, SPARK continues to pioneer and meet the needs of women-related causes,” Smith said. To learn more about Dancehipology you can visit www.dancehipology.com or call 574-400-5408 to sign up for fall classes. The studio is located in the Emporium Building at 121 South Niles Avenue. Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at [email protected]last_img read more

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first_imgMusic educator José Antonio Abreu received the final Notre Dame Prize for Distinguished Public Service in Latin America. Abreu was awarded the prize on Sept. 22 at a private on-campus ceremony.The award spotlights those who have made a large impact in the lives of citizens of Latin America, Paolo G. Carozza, director of the Helen Kellogg Institute for International Studies, said.“Since 2000, in partnership with the Coca-Cola Foundation, we have presented this distinctive award to a dozen distinguished Latin American leaders in recognition of their efforts to enhance the region’s public welfare,” Carozza said. “The Notre Dame Prize celebrates the significant role visionary public figures play in strengthening democracy and improving the well-being of citizens across Latin America and the Caribbean.”The criteria for the award include visionary leadership, distinction in public service and advancement of the well-being of the citizens of Latin America, Carmen-Helena Téllez, professor of conducting, said.“Abreu was chosen because he has matched these criteria in an unexpected field, that of classical music. He created a network of youth orchestras in Venezuela, now colloquially known in the U.S. as El Sistema,” Téllez said. “Through this network, Abreu offers young people under trying circumstances of poverty and crime an avenue for survival and self-determination through the discipline and camaraderie of orchestral practice.”El Sistema has had a huge social as well as artistic impact in Latin America, Téllez said.“Many people today say that Abreu not only saved young people from a life of criminality, but also saved classical music from being considered irrelevant by certain pockets of society,” Téllez said. “Many think classical music is elitist, but they forget that the greatest classical composers have been humanitarians or defenders of human dignity, and art is one of the tools of expression of the spirit. Abreu instills these values through his work.”The goals of Abreu’s work and that of the Kellog Institute are the same, Téllez said.“As a Latin American artist and economist, Abreu represents a geographical area of research for the Kellogg Institute,” Téllez said. “The Kellogg has become very important for its study of democracy and social advancement in the region. Abreu’s work addresses these areas with unexpected tools and extraordinary results, and it is very fitting that the Kellogg institute has recognized his work.”The award is the last of its kind, Carozza said.“It is the last award because the entire initiative was funded by a large, multi-year grant from the Coca-Cola Foundation, and that funding has now been exhausted and not renewed,” Carozza said. “Note, however, that a few years ago we started giving a different recognition, the Notre Dame Award for International Human Development and Solidarity, and that is now going strong.”Abreu’s work provides an example to students of how thinking outside the box can provide new and exciting ways to help others, Téllez said.“I think that undergrads can learn that doing good and transforming lives and communities, even in extraordinary ways, can come through anything and everything that they are called to do in life, so long as it is done with passion and love for others,” Carozza said.Tags: distinguished public service prize, José Antonio Abreu, latin america, music educator, notre dame prize for distinguished public service in latin americalast_img read more

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first_imgWalsh Hall held its signature event, the Mr. ND talent competition, Thursday evening in Washington Hall to raise money for the Ronald McDonald House. According to Liz Berndt and Charlotte Hogan, this year’s organizers and emcees, this was the first year all 15 male dorms had representatives at Mr. ND.Berndt and Hogan said it took a lot of coordination to find all 15 representatives and to put the event together.“Most of the guys came to us, or our friends found people who were interesting, or girls in Walsh found people who knew boys in other dorms,” Berndt said.Hogan said they also posted on the Mr. ND Facebook page and announced at Hall Council they were looking for contestants. In the end, 15 male students agreed to represent their dorms at Mr. ND, and Charles Filipiak from Siegfried Hall was crowned winner of the event.Amy Ackerman | The Observer This year’s Mr. ND featured a variety of talent performances, which included break dancing, freestyle deejaying, harmonica playing and performing poetry.The judges for the competition this year included Walsh’s rectress Liz Detwiler, Walsh RA Sarah Witt and last year’s winner of Mr. ND, Nick Barella. Barella, who represented Keough Hall last year, said he judged the contestants purely on talent. “It was really tough,” he said. “There were very diverse talents, and it was really funny this year.” Filipiak said he had a lot of fun meeting the other contestants.“It’s been really wonderful. It’s so great to have the rest of the dorm out here and all of my friends to support me,” he said.Although the judges chose who won the title of Mr. ND, the women of Walsh Hall voted on their favorite contestant and crowned Jack Harris from Dillon Hall as Mr. Walsh. Harris, who danced in high school and continues to do so at Notre Dame, performed a dance routine for the talent competition.“This was a great experience because I have a lot of friends in Walsh, and to be able to do an event with them is a really good experience,” Harris said. “I got in touch with my feminine side with Beyoncé but still had my groove on with a couple other songs. And I just like dancing, and this was a great way to express that.”The final award for the night was Mr. Fan Fave, which went to Chris Collins from Zahm Hall.At the end of the night, Berndt and Hogan said they were proud of how well this year’s Mr. ND competition had gone. “It’s really fun, low-key,” Hogan said. “Really entertaining, and it goes to charity.”Tags: Mr. ND, Siegfried Hall, Walsh Halllast_img read more

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first_imgTags: Grease, PEMCo, Washington Hall Photo Courtesy of Jake Ricci Cast members of the Pasquerilla East Musical Company’s, “Grease,” which has showings Thursday to Saturday, practice “Those Magic Changes,” one of the show’s musical numbers.The Pasquerilla East Musical Company (PEMCo) is shaping up to perform “Grease” March 23-25 on the Washington Hall main stage.Senior Morgan Rice, who is a producer for the show, said the musical was previously performed as PEMCo’s third main stage musical production in 2000, and 18 members of this original PEMCo “Grease” cast will be in attendance at the Saturday show.Seventeen years later, PEMCo executive producer, senior Amanda Bartolini, said PEMCo has grown quite a bit in terms of budget and the show is going to reflect these increased capabilities.“We really have a strong tech team and we wanted to emphasize that but we also wanted to have a big enough show to emphasize all the talent we have — over 100 people came to try out,” Rice said.Senior Samantha Squeri is directing the show and said she collaborated with a group of producers to choose “Grease,” taking into consideration factors such as budget and talent pool.Squeri and Rice said they were drawn to redoing “Grease,” a notorious fan favorite, and giving it a better message to make it more accessible in today’s world.The current production team hopes to take the well-known story in a new direction. This performance differs from the 2000 performance not only in the fact that it will utilize never-before-seen lighting effects, but also in the stronger feminist message it conveys.“It’s definitely going to be a new production based on the way that our director is taking it,” Bartolini said.Though the storyline and songs from the musical are well known, Squeri was not exactly devoted to the musical’s sometimes controversial message, which she said was originally intended as a satire. Squeri said instead she opted for alterations to the show that will give the audience an opportunity to think about something deeper.“At the end, Sandy isn’t changing for him, she’s changing for her … she’s coming more into her own, being more comfortable with her own self, her own person and her own sexuality. We are trying to show that the Pink Ladies encourage her to be who she wants to be by the end, and it just so happens that being more confident in herself makes [Danny] more attracted to her,” Squeri said.Sophomore Mario Simone, who plays Danny, said the role was difficult to prepare for due to the new direction of the show.“We basically created a new character for Danny, where he’s not as interested in Sandy as an object and more in her as a confident new person,” he said.In addition to thematic changes, some of the songs may sound unfamiliar to audience members, as they are in the original musical, but not the 1978 movie version.“People are going to hear music that’s probably new to them … people will be entertained by the classics but get some new stuff as well,” Bartolini said. “It’s worth their time to invest in seeing it again.”Rice said she was confident the production will be a success.“We’re hoping that with this production we can bring more than just entertainment value and bring home a more important message,” Rice said.Performances will take place at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday.last_img read more

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first_imgSaint Mary’s will begin screening testing Sept. 22, the College announced an update posted to the Live.Learn.Work. website.“Screening testing allows an organization to discover positive cases, in particular among asymptomatic individuals,” the website said.The current plan will test 60 students a week, approximately 5% of the student population, through early November. According to the website, all undergraduate and graduate students who attend in-person classes are eligible for testing, and faculty and staff will not be tested at this time.Students that will be removed from the random selection pool include “anyone who tested positive within 12 weeks of the current week, students who are currently in quarantine/isolation and students who withdraw effective immediately, during the semester.”The testing will take place every Tuesday and Thursday from 4-5:30 p.m. in the Health and Counseling Center. Students will be informed of their selection on Friday by email and text message. They will then be required to make an appointment via SignUpGenius. Students who do not attend their appointments will be subject to a disciplinary process.These rapid antigen tests will be free of charge to students.Tags: Health and Counseling Center, random testing, saint marys covid response, screening testinglast_img read more

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first_imgWNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.MAYVILLE — The number of active COVID-19 cases in Chautauqua County dropped from 23 to 19 on Thursday.That’s according to Chautauqua County Health Officials, who also reported two new cases of a young adult and a male in his 20s.Officials say 325 cases are under quarantine/isolation orders by the Public Health Director and are being monitored. Not all of those being monitored are confirmed to have COVID-19 but have either shown symptoms, are awaiting results, or have risk factors.A total of 779 people are under domestic traveler quarantine for having arrived to Chautauqua County from a state listed on the New York State travel advisory. One person is hospitalized in Chautauqua County as of Tuesday. To date:190 recovered cases;8 deaths;217 total confirmed cases; and20,798 negative test results. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgMGN ImageMAYVILLE – Chautauqua County officials have reported eight new cases of COVID-19 Tuesday afternoon with 59 active cases.The new cases consist of one case in Dunkirk, five cases in Fredonia, and two cases in Portland.There are currently three active cases among employees of Fieldbrook Foods with no active community contacts. 82 people associated with this outbreak have recovered.There are also 18 active cases among SUNY Fredonia students while 75 people have recovered. 329 cases remain under quarantine or isolation orders by the Public Health Director and 30 people are under domestic traveler quarantine for having arrived to Chautauqua County from a state listed on the New York State Travel Advisory.There remains four hospitalizations across Chautauqua County.To date, there have been 590 confirmed cases, 521 recoveries, 10 fatalities, and 39,260 negative test results.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgJAMESTOWN – The second half of the weekend will be mainly quiet and cooler. The remains of Delta look to stay off to south and east for Columbus Day. For Today, mostly cloudy and cooler with highs in the low to mid-60’s.Tonight, mostly cloudy with a shower or two possible. Lows in the lower-50’s. Remnants of  Hurricane Delta will largely remain off to our east and southeast on Monday with the best chance of showers across central New York. Otherwise it will be mostly cloudy with highs in the mid-60’s.High pressure builds in for Tuesday and Wednesday allowing for sunny skies and highs in the low to mid-60’s.Another cold front will cross the region by late week allowing for a better chance of rain and much cooler temperatures. As of now highs may struggle to make it out of the lower-50’s.WNYNewsNow is a proud Ambassador for the NOAA Weather-Ready Nation program.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_img Of Mice and Men OK, OK, you probably heard about how Of Mice and Men star James Franco’s stage door meeting with a teen fan turned into a thwarted social media hookup that she made public. But you have to hand it to the busy actor for not shrinking from the controversy. Franco turned up on Live with Kelly and Michael on April 4 to admit he’s ashamed of his behavior. “I’m embarrassed, and I guess I’m just a model of how social media is tricky,” he said. Watch more below. Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on July 27, 2014 View Commentslast_img

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