first_img Subscribe Herbeauty9 Hollywood Divas Who Fell In Love With WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty’First Daughters’: From Cute Little Kids To Beautiful Young WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Celebrities Who’ve Lost Their FandomsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyFollow This Summer Most Popular Celeb Beauty TrendHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena City College honors one of its distinguished alumni, Jaime Escalante (Class of 1969), in an unprecedented exhibition that honors his life and teaching career.Jaime Escalante: A Life Con Ganas runs from March 5 to April 10 in PCC’s Circadian. The exhibition includes Escalante’r personal artifacts, video production by the Foundation for the Advancement of Science and Education (FASE), and objects that feature his teaching methodology in the field of mathematics. The items in the exhibition were borrowed from Escalante’s family, which gave PCC access to the collection.The exhibition traces Escalante’s migration journey and how becamse one of America’s most revered teachers, following the release of the 1988 film Stand and Deliver that features his 1982 class at Garfield High School in Los Angeles.“The PCC community has come together to honor the legacy of a man who dedicated hs life to education,” said Dr. Cynthia Olivo, PCC associate vice president of Student Services. “The results of his work revealed that every student is capable of learning the most complex math concepts. The art of teaching, a celebration of learning, and a commitment to social justice are the underlying sentiments of this exhibit for Jaime Escalante.”As PCC celebrates its 90th anniversary this year, the college has been featuring notable alumni through special events such as the Jackie Robinson Arts and Humanities Lecture Series. The exhibition includes public programming with PCC’s partners from the Pasadena Playhouse’s Mi Historia, Mi Manera project, which is funded by the James Irvine Foundation.Other activities schedule to run concurrently with the exhibition include:* Reading of the play, Stand and Deliver, on Marc 19 at 6:00 p.m. in PCC’s Creveling Lounge* Presentation by Jay Mathews, noted journalist from the Washington Post, who will share his experiences writing the biography Escalante: The Best Teacher in America on March 20, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in PCC’s Westerbeck Recital Hall;* Presentation by Luis Torres, journalist and author of His Students: Escalante’s Living Legacy, who will share his work on March 24, from 12 to 1:30 p.m. in PCC’s Creveling Lounge; and* Screening of the film, Stand and Deliver on April 2 at 6:00 p.m. in the Campus Center WiFi Lounge.The exhibition is made possible through diverse entities who knew Escalante personally and others who believe in the message of his life’s work. The exhibition has provided a premiere partnership with FASE, which produced a series of educational videos with Escalante that won the Peabody Award. Also, it has expanded the ongoing partnership with Pasadena Playhouse through the Mi Historia, Mi Manera initiative. Mi Historia, Mi Manera is meant to increase adult Latina/o participation in theatre, expand The Playhouse’s reach into non-traditional venues in the region, and to increase the impact of the arts by building community-focused performing arts programming that creates long-term relationships with the Latina/o community in the San Gabriel Valley.Although several publications have written about him, no institution has organized a show of this kind in honor of Escalante. The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue that includes reflections by actor Edward James Olmos and Keith Miller, director at FASE; a eulogy by Elsa Bolado, one his students at Garfield High School; and a curatorial by Reina Alejandra Prado Saldivar.The exhibition is free and open to the public. Pasadena City College is located at 1570 E. Colorado Blvd. in Pasadena. For more information, please contact Reina Prado Saldivar, via emal at [email protected] or Christopher Jimenez y West at [email protected] Education Jaime Escalante: A Life Con Ganas, An Exhibition That Honors His Life Opens March 5, 2015 at Pasadena City College From STAFF REPORTS Published on Thursday, February 26, 2015 | 6:05 pm EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment Community News 11 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Top of the News center_img Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy First Heatwave Expected Next Week More Cool Stuff Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Read More

first_imgNews UpdatesDelhi HC Issues Notice In Plea Seeking Direction To PMC Bank To Allow Its Depositors To Withdraw Upto ₹5 Lacs In Light of COVID19 Karan Tripathi20 July 2020 11:38 PMShare This – xDelhi High Court has issued notice in a plea seeking a direction to be issued to the Punjab & Maharashtra Cooperative Bank (PMC Bank) to allow its depositors to withdraw upto ₹5 lacs in light of medical emergencies caused by COVID19The Division Bench of Chief Justice DN Patel and Justice Prateek Jalan has issued notices to the PMC Bank, Reserve Bank of India, and the…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginDelhi High Court has issued notice in a plea seeking a direction to be issued to the Punjab & Maharashtra Cooperative Bank (PMC Bank) to allow its depositors to withdraw upto ₹5 lacs in light of medical emergencies caused by COVID19The Division Bench of Chief Justice DN Patel and Justice Prateek Jalan has issued notices to the PMC Bank, Reserve Bank of India, and the Central Government. The order has come in a PIL filed by Bejon Kumar Mishra highlighting the difficulties faced by senior citizens due to the moratorium imposed by RBI on the withdrawal of deposits from PMC Bank. The Petitioner had sought court’s direction to the RBI to ease out the moratorium for withdrawal of deposited money of depositors from PMC Bank during the pandemic of COVID19. ‘The situation has come to such a pass that the depositors are completely helpless in carrying out their day to day financial activities and becoming victims of avoidable debt and mortgage’, the petition states. The Petitioner has demanded for a direction to be issued to the RBI for ensuring the withdrawal of at least the insured amount of Rs 500000/- immediately to cater to the medical and other urgent needs of depositors of PMC Bank during such health crisis.The Petitioner has argued that:’The hypocrisy of the lack of liquidity with the bank is evidenced by the fact that approximately more than eight crore of rupees are being spent on the upkeep and maintenance of the non-functioning PMC Bank branches. This implies that the respondents’ bank has sufficient liquidity to bear the operational costs like rents, salary of employees and other office expenses but the depositors are struggling to withdraw their own deposited money.’It is further argued by the Petitioner that depositors of PMC Bank are under serious distress and discriminated under similar situation, without any relief and justice.In addition to this, the Petitioner has asked for an interim financial package for senior citizen depositors who are facing several health issues including various urgent needs in the interest of justice.Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

Read More

first_imgWABC-TV(NEW YORK) — A Nashville woman filed a $5 million lawsuit against a former New York City police officer who broke into her home, threatened her and yelled racial slurs in the midst of a drunken rage.Conese Halliburton, who is black, filed a federal lawsuit against Michael Reynolds on Wednesday, accusing him of charges including assault, trespassing and emotional distress.While visiting Nashville for a bachelor party in 2018, Reynolds, who is white, kicked in Halliburton’s door and screamed that he would “break every f—— bone” in her neck and called her and her children the N-word, according to the lawsuit.“Approximately eight minutes after invading Ms. Halliburton’s home, terrorizing Ms. Halliburton and her minor children, hurling racial slurs at them, and threatening them with deadly force, Officer Reynolds casually returned to the Airbnb where he was staying when it became clear to him that police were about to arrive,” the lawsuit said. “Upon leaving Ms. Halliburton’s home, a companion of Officer Reynolds yelled out and asked him: ‘Did you make her strip?’”Reynolds, who resigned from the New York Police Department earlier this month, was convicted on charges of assault and criminal trespassing in connection with the July 2018 incident. He was sentenced to 15 days in jail and three years’ probation in December after pleading no contest to four misdemeanors, according to court records.An attorney for Reynolds declined to comment when reached by ABC News.More than 10,000 people signed an online petition calling for his firing in support of Halliburton. Reynolds testified that he and his friends had been drinking before the incident. He could not remember how much he drank, but he said he entered Halliburton’s the home by mistake, thinking that it was his rental property, according to court testimony.“Ms. Halliburton hopes that ex-officer Reynolds has had some time to consider the consequences of his actions while serving his jail sentence,” Daniel Horwitz, the woman’s attorney, told ABC News in a statement Wednesday. “She also intends to continue pursuing this matter until Mr. Reynolds and the other officers who helped him try to cover up his egregious and criminal misconduct are held fully accountable.”Halliburton said the episode had left her and her children traumatized.“My kids want to move. They don’t want to be in that house anymore,” she said at the officer’s sentencing last month. “We don’t have peace. To know that you’ve been living somewhere all your life, and you don’t have that anymore, and where would you go, it’s not fair.”“It’s not fair that somebody can laugh in your face and their friends can laugh about it like it’s a joke, and your life stops, and their life can keep on going,” she added.Halliburton is seeking punitive damages of $3.75 million and compensatory damages of $1.25 million, according to the suit.Earlier this month, the NYPD revealed that Reynolds had been placed on “modified duty” in light of the ongoing case. It announced the officer’s resignation, effective immediately, a few days later.“He will receive no pension or health benefits, nor will he be allowed to carry a firearm,” the NYPD said in a statement after the resignation. “His actions are wholly inconsistent with the values and standards the New York City Police Department expects and demands of its officers.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

first_imgThe work of Pembroke’s Academic Director, Dr Mark Fricker, has been used in the making of the documentary film ‘Super Fungi: Can mushrooms help save the world?’Dr Fircker’s research informs us that, “The whole organism is one single giant cell, albeit containing many nuclei, that can grow to be many centimetres in size.” James Rhodes, a first year student at New College, was astounded by this, saying, “These moulds seem more developed than I am – I wish I could grow a couple more centimetres whenever I wanted.”Dr Fricker went on to say, “Although it has no brain or nervous system, its exploratory behaviour and the network itself is highly responsive and continuously adapts to whatever is happening around it.”This results in these moulds’ extraordinary ability to solve certain abstract problems, such as the shortest path through a maze, and raises their possible use in communication. One third year student took well to this, “I want to communicate via mushroom – no one uses the inter-college landlines anyway.”The film ‘Super Fungi’, partially based upon Fricker’s work, has already received much critical acclaim, winning two awards at the 2013 Pariscience International Film Festival. The documentary is about the possibilities that fungi open up for development, and to overcoming challenges which so far have not been solved by the synthetic creations of humans.In the film’s description, examples of a variety of different fungi and their uses are given, from Laccaria Bicolor – which allows trees to grow in deserts – to Fomitopsis officinalis, which can be a last chance drug for sufferers of incurable diseases. Indeed, they are promising so many applications that American mycologist Paul Stamets asserts, “Mushrooms will help save the world”.The short trailer to the documentary reveals little-known facts about fungi, explaining, “The fungi kingdom is one of the largest in nature … comprised of giants larger than a white whale, to Lilliputians the size of a speck of dust.”Arieh Frosh, a second year fine art student, was somewhat confused by this news, saying, “I can’t believe there are mushrooms bigger than white whales, I struggle to eat the little ones. Who’s hiding these massive mushrooms?”last_img read more

Read More

first_imgIf at first –or second or third – you don’t succeed, try again. For the Ocean City girls basketball team, the formula paid off on Monday afternoon with a South Jersey championship.The 2nd seeded Red Raiders (19-7) lost in three previous encounters to arch-rival Mainland Regional, all in overtime, including a stinging 41-39 defeat in the Cape Atlantic League championship game on February 24.It was a competitive game, that Ocean City led throughout.But all that was a distant memory on Monday afternoon with OC’s stunning 36-32 defeat of the previously undefeated and top-seeded Mustangs (28-1) in the South Jersey Group III championship game.Played before a packed house at the Mainland gym, the Raiders looked poised throughout and in control, taking a 23-16 lead at the half. Danielle Donoghue’s buzzer-beating shot went in to punctuate the run and send the Raiders off to the locker-room with confidence at the break.  They would score only 13 points the rest of the way, but a lockdown defense enabled Ocean City to close out the contest and advance in the New Jersey State Athletic Association tourney.Emma Finnegan (43) Danielle Donoghue (1) and Tori Rolls (10) join hands as time winds down at the conclusion of Ocean City’s victory in the South Jersey Championship game.With the win, the Raiders advanced to the South Jersey semi-final on Wednesday against the winner of Ewing and Allentown. The game will take place 7 p.m. at Deptford (Gloucester County) high school.For Mainland, the game was a bad case of déjà vu. The Raiders took the sectional final over the Mustangs last year by a 38-31 count.  Most observers considered the Mustangs to be the favorite this time, but the game illustrated how difficult it is to beat a closely-matched and familiar opponent four times in one season.The celebration is on after the Ocean City girls basketball team defeated Mainland last night in the South Jersey Group III title gameThe game began at a tense pace with Ocean City holding a 7-5 lead after the first quarter, but they outscored Mainland 16-11 in the second and 6-5 in the third. They withstood a Mainland rally in the final stanza to secure the victory and set off a wild celebration on the Ocean City bench and silencing the home crowd.No Ocean City scorer hit double figures, but sharing the ball and balanced scoring were key. Emme Finnegan paced OC with 9 points on three field goals and three made foul shots, followed by 7 each from Donoghue, Delaney Lappin and ToriRolls. Kylie Wyers chipped in with 4 Abbey Fenton completed the Ocean City scoring with 2Mainland star Kylee Watson led all scorers with 14 and Gabby Boggs had 9. But the remainder of the Mustangs’ roster could muster only a combined 9 points against the strong Ocean City defense.Anytime Ocean City and Mainland Regional hook up to do battle on the field or court, it’s going to be an intense battle. It’s been that way ever since Mainland opened in 1961 and the former Ocean City sending districts of Somers Point, Linwood and Northfield formed a new regional high school district and an instant rivalry was born. Located just across the bay from each other, OC and Mainland can count their season as a success regardless of record, if they defeat their traditional rival.Coach Baruffi with Mickey BakerMonday’s battle at Linwood was the latest chapter in a series that defines the essence of high school sports.When the bus carrying the athletes arrived back at OCHS, Danielle Donoghue emerged with the championship trophy and a big smile.Please see our facebook page for more pictures and to add your own…last_img read more

Read More
April 21, 2021

Dublin up

first_imgRoly’s Bistro is a modern rarity: a restaurant that bakes its own bread and confectionery, rather than relying on mixes or pre-baked products. Now it has done something even more rare: it has set up a bakery shop and café to sell the products that were previously the reserve of the restaurant. It is even thinking of franchising the concept – or at least extending it to other outlets.The bakery and café has been set up in an area on the ground floor of Roly’s, which opened in 1992 in a prime main road position in Ballsbridge, south Dublin. Even though it has been open for less than 20 years, it is firmly established as one of the city’s top lunch and dinner spots, with a 20,000-copies-selling recipe book under its belt and a second edition planned.A decade ago, Roly’s, owned by John and Angela O’ Sullivan and a consortium of shareholders, including chef de cuisine Paul Cartwright, opened the bakery that is now moving out from the shadows into the front-of-house.Cartwright admits the off-putting overheads of the new bakery shop and café operation were considerable, not least the wages of the 14 people required to keep the whole show going – a reason why most restaurants opt for the easy option and buy in bread. Head baker, David Walsh, who joined a growing band of chefs converting to bakers, having undergone an advanced pastry course at Tallaght Institute of Technology in Dublin, insist the costs pay off through developing a local reputation as a restaurant with quality bakery products.Roly’s has already had long experience of supplying bakery products to other trade customers, including some local hotels and, at one stage, Aer Lingus. But since part of the restaurant was converted into a bakery shop and café with 70 covers, two-thirds of bread production could ultimately be sold through the shop.The bakery shop itself opens early, seven days a week, while the adjacent café is open six days a week. So far, say Cartwright and Walsh, the customer reaction to the café and bakery shop has been extremely positive – so much so that during the peak weekday time of 12 noon until 1.30pm, long queues of workers from many nearby offices line up. “We want to encourage customers to send in their lunchtime orders in advance, so that they can just drop in and collect them, rather than queue,” adds Walsh.They’re now exploring the possibility of rolling out the café bakery – possibly as a franchise, explains Dublin-born Cartwright, who trained in Ireland and France and worked in London, including at the Savoy Hotel. Cartwright says the restaurant itself has loads of personality and would be hard to replicate, but that the café and shop style and format would be easier to reproduce.== Roly’s retail strategy ==Making the most of its location in the heart of bustling Ballsbridge, Roly’s Café & Bakery opens from 7.30am daily, Monday to Friday, and 9am on Saturdays, offering a full breakfast menu. A varied lunch menu, freshly prepared sandwiches and wraps, and a range of coffees and drinks to eat in or take away will keep the Roly’s Café busy until 4.30pm. At the front of the café, the bakery area stays open until 7pm every day, including Sundays, offering cakes, breads, soups and pre-prepared meals to take home.The interior of Roly’s Café & Bakery echoes the newly remodelled ground floor of Roly’s Bistro. Clean lines, marble floors and pale painted wood panelling create a calm and relaxing ambience. Roly’s Café & Bakery has its own entrance from the street, but the remainder of the interior of Roly’s Bistro is unchanged.The restaurant has seating for about 220 diners and, on a really busy day, it can serve up to 1,000 meals a day. The bakery itself is small, around 60sq m, but it turns out an impressive product list. Walsh explains that it specialises in gluten-free bread, including banana and walnut, and also bakes a lot of yeast breads. “We do a couple of different brown breads, as well as about a dozen different speciality loaves, including spinach and raisin, tomato and fennel and Mediterranean breads”. Small and large brown soda bread loaves retail at E2.35 and E2.75 (£1.80 and £2.20), alongside speciality breads including flutes, baguettes and ciabattas.The confectionery side covers many classics, such as tarts, vanilla mille feuilles, puff and sweet pastries, right through to Viennese lines and larger cakes. And it’s likely that the bakery shop will expand into wedding cakes. One of the surprises that has emerged is the consumer demand for small cakes right through the week. A fruit scone sells for E2.50 (£2), while a raspberry tart is priced at E5.25 (£4.15).This year, Roly’s will turn over about E8 million (£6.35m), employing around 110 people.Diversifying into bakery out-sales has been an innovative step for this prime Irish restaurant – a trend-setting development that has certainly added substantially to the restaurant’s turnover. Queues of customers are a healthy sign that this new venture will work well for the future.—-=== Restaurant-cum-bakeries: three of the best ===== Ottolenghi: London N1 2TZ ==Ottolenghi has been baking its own breads, cakes and Viennoiserie since the first restaurant was launched in 2002. Last year, it opened a site in Camden, London, to supply its four outlets with breads and pastries. “We have a kitchen on every site where we bake fresh every day – cakes, morning pastries, tarts, meringues and other patisserie lines,” says Yotam Ottolenghi.Specialities of the house include sourdough bread, white Italian rustic loaf, sour cherry and walnut stick and several types of focaccia. Best-sellers are lemon and mascarpone tartlet, hazelnut brownie, cornbread and giant raspberry meringues. “We prefer to make everything in-house so that we can maintain the highest of standards. We know precisely what we are selling and the processes are involved. This is what our customers have come to expect,” he says.== St John’s Bread and Wine: London E1 6LZ ==Fergus Henderson and Trevor Gulliver run their bakery in Spitalfields supplying their restaurant on the same site, as well as their other restaurant in Smithfield. Trevor Gulliver explains that they started baking their own breads and pastries five years ago. They used to sell also in a local farmers’ market, but don’t have enough capacity for that now. “Baking our own means we can maintain the very best in hand-crafted breads and patisserie, using the best ingredients and flour,” says Gulliver. “The traditionally-milled flour we use is much better than industrial flour and our bread is definitely different.”== Lainston House Hotel: Winchester SO21 2LT ==This luxury country house hotel has had a baking operation for the past 10 years. All breads are made as ferment and dough or from a leaven. A well-stocked herb garden provides ingredients for some loaves, such as rosemary and sultana or tomato and walnut. Breads produced include ciabattas, while as many as 1,000 biscuits a week are made, in addition to Danish pastries, croissants and pains au chocolat. Two bakers are employed and the man in charge, Adrian Chant, says: “In-house baking is preferred, as the product quality is better and the size is exactly what we want. Customers want things that are different to the regular products they can get elsewhere”.The bakery also supplies some local shops and nearby farmers’ markets.last_img read more

Read More

first_imgTell me a story.That tender and urgent imperative appears to date to early in humankind. “We are simply hardwired to stories,” said Pulitzer Prize-winning nonfiction writer Tracy Kidder. “People like to receive stories,” and to tell them too.“You can argue with a political question,” added novelist and writing activist Erika Duncan, “but you can’t argue with a story.”Kidder and Duncan, founder of the Herstory Writers Workshop, participated in a panel discussion Thursday on the uses of narrative and the deep human need for stories that amuse, surprise, instruct, and otherwise make temporary sense of a disorderly world.“Tell Me a Story,” sponsored by Harvard College Students for Scholars at Risk, drew a standing-room-only crowd to Lamont Library’s Forum Room. The seven-member student group, co-chaired by emcee Madeline Holland ’15 and by Edwin Whitman ’15, adds undergraduate energy to Harvard’s longtime Scholars at Risk chapter, which each year sponsors a brief refuge at the University for four to six writers, artists, jurists, and others whose ideas could bring harm or death in their native lands.The idea is to “get them out of desperate mortal risk,” said panel moderator and literary scholar Stephen Greenblatt, and restore for a time “what makes life sweet and possible.” Greenblatt is Harvard’s John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities, a Pulitzer Prize-winning Shakespeare scholar, and co-chair of the Scholars at Risk Committee.At the heart of every Scholar at Risk, said Greenblatt, is a “very powerful life story.” That reality fueled a panel to look at what stories are and what meaning they offer beyond simply imparting facts. “Until the story is appended,” said poet Robert Pinsky, a former U.S. poet laureate who teaches at Boston University, “it’s just information.”Each panelist told a story either overheard or reported. Pinsky riffed an old King Arthur tale. Duncan related tales from her work with inmates in two Suffolk County jails. In one, a pregnant inmate was asked to walk to speed up dilation; she was in shackles. (Listen to “unwanted stories,” Duncan said later in praise of her obscure narrators. “They’ve been silent because nobody wants them.”) Kidder chose something from his book “Strength in What Remains,” about a young man from war-wracked Burundi who helped heal his nightmares by writing them down.Harvard’s Jill Lepore, the David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History and a staff writer at The New Yorker, related the 1741 story of hundreds of male slaves imprisoned in New York, accused of being revolutionaries and arsonists. Harvard medical anthropologist Kimberly Theidon, the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, told the story of an old man who witnessed slaughter in a Peruvian civil war.Even Greenblatt told a story about a feckless Harvard graduate who briefly reclaimed his life by saving thousands of Jews in the early days of the Holocaust. “This is a man who somehow found his way,” he said. Greenblatt later told another story, about a troubled Danish prince, who at the end of numerous bloody plot turns urged his best friend to stay alive — just to tell his story, that of Hamlet. (A story left untold, after all, is a death.)Only one panelist told her own story: exiled Ethiopian political activist and jurist Birtukan Midekssa, a onetime Scholar at Risk and now a student at the Harvard Kennedy School. She had been imprisoned twice, for a total of 41 months, and spent six of those months in solitary confinement. “I could not understand how a person could be treated like that,” she said, “for just speaking, for just telling a story.”Those practices are repeated, said Midekssa, in many nations where carefully shaped narratives of propaganda are silencing the stories of the citizens. Any national “system of lies,” she said, “can’t stand authentic storytelling.”Stories “rarely change the world,” said Kidder, “but they are still wanted,” even if just to assuage grief or prompt deep feelings for others. Kidder related the plot of “Misery,” his favorite Chekhov story. A despairing Russian sleigh-driver could not get anyone to listen to the story of his son’s death. In the end, he told the story to his horse, who listened patiently.Some stories are told “as a moral obligation,” said Theidon, whose work investigates the difficulty that “intimate enemies” in a civil war have in communicating afterward. In the absence of a clear moral, Kidder said later, at least stories are sometimes good at “organizing chaos,” at making the world seem, for a time, that it makes more sense than it actually does.That was certainly true of Lepore’s story of the slaves imprisoned in New York. The island of Manhattan was then home to barely 10,000 souls, she said, and one in five were slaves. In that era, it was the greatest density of enslaved servants north of Maryland. To modern historians, the dearth of records from the slaves obscures the true story. (In writing history, “there’s always an accountability to evidence,” said Lepore. “That’s the trick.”) But bringing the story alive is still possible, as she did. First, she painted a picture of New York as it was then: a rude town settled just a mile beyond the tip of the island. Fires back then created understandable panic. Bucket brigades formed, said Lepore, “like a row of paper dolls down to the river.”She made the story come alive, too, by reminding the audience that in 1741 the story had its own storyteller: Mary Burton, a 16-year-old servant who claimed to have heard slaves plotting to burn the city down and then “marry all the white women.” In the end, 17 of the slaves were hanged, 13 were burned alive, and the rest were sent away by ship.Storytelling technique itself can be a solace, said Pinsky. The story he told took the comforting shape of a fairytale. It was a narrative with dramatic characters (King Arthur, his faithful knights, an ugly damsel); a riddle that carried the threat of death; a good knight, Sir Gawain, who saves the day; and a happy ending (The damsel, once embraced, loved, and given free will, becomes beautiful).After two hours of stories, the sun had nearly set. Greenblatt called an end to things. “May you all live,” he said, “happily ever after.”last_img read more

Read More

first_imgThis Notre Dame junior will be competing on the Jeopardy! College Championship. Who is Olivia Colangelo? Tonight Colangelo, a junior engineering major from McGlinn Hall, will appear on the popular television quiz show for its college competition. Colangelo taped the show on Oct. 18 and 19 in Culver City, Calif. While taping is completed, she was not allowed to disclose the results of the competition. “It was actually not as nerve-wracking as I expected,” Colangelo said. “They have people who make sure you are not nervous and are having fun on television. They talk to you about things that are not Jeopardy! It did not feel like you were taping for a large studio audience.” Colangelo said her time spent as a student at Notre Dame had equipped her with the skills necessary for the experience of being on a televised game show. “I think for me, Notre Dame helped prepare me with coming here as a freshman. I was the only person from my high school which made me talk to people I did not know,” she said. “I think this helped in the auditions and when I got there.” She said one of the most rewarding aspects of her time on Jeopardy! was her fellow college-aged contestants. “You are put in a room with 15 other people, and the producer commented on how we hit it off,” Colangelo said. “We are all Facebook friends and we plan on talking to each other when the show is on the air.” Colangelo also said taping the show was exciting based on the location of the Jeopardy! set, which is located on the Sony Studio lot. “For me, one of the neatest things of the experience was we were on a film studio lot. The set was beautiful. Also, we got to eat lunch at the Sony commissary,” she said. “Some of the people competing even saw Brad Pitt.” Colangelo said one of the trickier aspects of participating on the show was preparing for the wide array of questions. “I tried to prepare mostly by watching the shows everyday,” she said. “Since it tests such a broad range of knowledge, it is hard to study anything specific.” Colangelo said she did study some specific material based on what subject areas she felt less comfortable with. “I tried to brush up on stuff I wasn’t as knowledgeable about or I haven’t encountered as an engineer, such as the plots of Shakespeare,” she said. Colangelo said participating on Jeopardy! has been a dream of hers for a long time. She said she was on an email list to try out for different versions of the show, including the College Championship. She took a 10-minute online quiz in the spring, which initiated her audition process. “They have an online test for all the shows they do,” Colangelo said. “I had known that I wanted to be on Jeopardy! for a while.” Overall, Colangelo said despite the impressive cash prizes available, which range from $5,000 to $100,000 for the winner, the experience of being on a game show itself is what she truly cherishes. “Going in, I thought about the money because $100,000 is a lot. But the first time I got on stage, I forgot about that because I love answering questions,” she said. “I realized the reason I originally wanted to be on was not the money, but the love of the concept of the show.”last_img read more

Read More

first_imgBroadway veteran and Emmy winner Charles Keating died at his Connecticut home on August 8. The cause of death was cancer, his son Sean confirmed to The Los Angeles Times. He was 72. Born on October 22, 1941 in London, Keating moved to Canada with his parents as a teenager. After appearing in regional productions in Canada and the U.S., he relocated to Britain, where he performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Chichester Festival Theatre. Keating was nominated for a Tony Award in 1986 for his performance in Loot. Prior to that, he appeared on the Great White Way in The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui and The House of Atreus. Keating is survived by his wife Mary of over 50 years, his two sons, Sean and Jamie, and six grandchildren.center_img View Comments While he had found success on stage, Keating became a familiar face to daytime TV viewers during his time on the long-running daytime drama Another World. He received a Daytime Emmy in 1996 for his performance as Carl Hutchins, having previously been nominated three times from1992 to 1994.last_img read more

Read More

first_imgPeruvian and Bolivian and law enforcement authorities are preparing to launch joint eradication efforts targeting illegal coca leaf crops along their shared border in 2015. They’ll also cooperate on interdictions of drug shipments on Lake Titicaca, which straddles the border between the two countries. Providing legal alternatives The 1,047-kilometer border shared by both countries is home to many farmers who grow coca leaves illegally to produce cocaine. For example, in the provinces of Sandia and San Antonio de Putina on the Peruvian side of the border, farmers grew more than 3,200 hectares of illegal coca leaf crops in 2013, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). The initiative is part of a cooperative security agreement signed on November 11 by Alberto Otárola, the Executive President of Peru’s National Commission for Development and Life without Drugs (DEVIDA), and Felipe Cáceres, Bolivia’s Vice Minister of Social Defense and Controlled Substances. That agreement was the key component of the Fourth Meeting of the Joint Peru-Bolivia Commission on cooperation on the war on drugs, held in Lima for representatives from both countries. “It seems to me that we are entering a new stage with both countries in their approach to this process, which has already required coordination and urgent measures from both governments, along our common border,” Otárola said when he and his Bolivian counterpart signed the agreement. The increased level of cooperation in the border region should help police from both countries detect and disrupt narco-flights. Drug traffickers often use small airplanes and clandestine airstrips to transport cocaine from Peru’s Apurimac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers valley (VRAEM) region to Bolivia. . “In the first three or six months of next year, we will already be seeing very concrete results from this meeting,” Bolivia’s Cáceres said during the signing ceremony. These types of initiatives have proven successful in some regions – in Peru’s San Martin department and Monzon Valley, for example, where farmers who once cultivated illegal coca leaves are now growing alternative crops. These types of initiatives have proven successful in some regions – in Peru’s San Martin department and Monzon Valley, for example, where farmers who once cultivated illegal coca leaves are now growing alternative crops. Drug policy authorities from both countries are also encouraging farmers in the border region to grow alternative, legal crops, such as coffee and cacao beans, which are used to produce chocolate. Cooperating to eradicate illegal coca leaf crops and interdict drug shipments are not the only components of the bilateral agreement. Providing legal alternatives Border initiative part of a broad security agreement Officials are optimistic that the bilateral agreement will improve public safety in the border region. Peruvian and Bolivian and law enforcement authorities are preparing to launch joint eradication efforts targeting illegal coca leaf crops along their shared border in 2015. They’ll also cooperate on interdictions of drug shipments on Lake Titicaca, which straddles the border between the two countries. On a typical day, three to six narco-planes travel from the VRAEM to Bolivia or Brazil, or from those countries to Peru, according to an investigation by the website IDL Reporteros. Each narco-flight carries an average of about 300 kilograms of cocaine paste. Drug policy authorities from both countries are also encouraging farmers in the border region to grow alternative, legal crops, such as coffee and cacao beans, which are used to produce chocolate. Cracking down on narco-flights The increased level of cooperation in the border region should help police from both countries detect and disrupt narco-flights. Drug traffickers often use small airplanes and clandestine airstrips to transport cocaine from Peru’s Apurimac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers valley (VRAEM) region to Bolivia. . Cooperating to eradicate illegal coca leaf crops and interdict drug shipments are not the only components of the bilateral agreement. Cracking down on narco-flights By Dialogo December 04, 2014 “These light aircraft travel back and forth between Bolivia and Peru, transporting illegal drugs along routes that we are identifying with the assistance of specialists in both countries,” Otárola said. “We will be able to announce a comprehensive response through the domestic and coordinated actions that we are going to have.” On a typical day, three to six narco-planes travel from the VRAEM to Bolivia or Brazil, or from those countries to Peru, according to an investigation by the website IDL Reporteros. Each narco-flight carries an average of about 300 kilograms of cocaine paste. Officials are optimistic that the bilateral agreement will improve public safety in the border region. Border initiative part of a broad security agreement The initiative is part of a cooperative security agreement signed on November 11 by Alberto Otárola, the Executive President of Peru’s National Commission for Development and Life without Drugs (DEVIDA), and Felipe Cáceres, Bolivia’s Vice Minister of Social Defense and Controlled Substances. That agreement was the key component of the Fourth Meeting of the Joint Peru-Bolivia Commission on cooperation on the war on drugs, held in Lima for representatives from both countries. “It seems to me that we are entering a new stage with both countries in their approach to this process, which has already required coordination and urgent measures from both governments, along our common border,” Otárola said when he and his Bolivian counterpart signed the agreement. Improving public safety along the border is a high priority for both countries, since it includes important trade and travel routes used by business people and travelers. “These light aircraft travel back and forth between Bolivia and Peru, transporting illegal drugs along routes that we are identifying with the assistance of specialists in both countries,” Otárola said. “We will be able to announce a comprehensive response through the domestic and coordinated actions that we are going to have.” Improving public safety along the border is a high priority for both countries, since it includes important trade and travel routes used by business people and travelers. The 1,047-kilometer border shared by both countries is home to many farmers who grow coca leaves illegally to produce cocaine. For example, in the provinces of Sandia and San Antonio de Putina on the Peruvian side of the border, farmers grew more than 3,200 hectares of illegal coca leaf crops in 2013, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). “In the first three or six months of next year, we will already be seeing very concrete results from this meeting,” Bolivia’s Cáceres said during the signing ceremony. The high ranking officials in the VRAE zone should be investigated because the small planes leave as if they were commercial flights right under the military’s nose. Really good news The agreement would be great Thank you armed forces for the support you give us Seizing drugs is a huge scam because the governments don’t do anything. The narcos have free rein to go anywhere it’s a scam that no one believes. They cross borders into any country they want with just a few bribes and that’s it. Well I think it’s a good agreement. But we hear about agreements all the time, and nothing good comes from the governments. I think they themselves are traffickers or friends of the traffickers. Let’s see what’s good this yearlast_img read more

Read More