first_imgWednesday Jun 3, 2015 Midweek Madness – Christian Wade butchers hat-trick try against the Barbarians England romped to a 73-12 victory over the Barbarians at Twickenham on Sunday, with the likes of Wade and Danny Cipriani piling on the points. Wade ended up with a hat-trick as England scored their highest ever win over the Baa-Baas.Earlier in the game the dynamic winger blew a golden opportunity though, bringing back memories of the likes of Christophe Dominici, Tana Umaga and even Christian Cullen. There are plenty more, so some notable bloopers have been listed in the Related Posts below this.Luckily for Wade, it mattered none as England proved too strong for a talented Barbarians outfit, and he grabbed a hat-trick later anyway. View the match highlights here.ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error See it to Believe it Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Experts explain what actually happens… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Leigh Halfpenny makes yet another… 26 WEEKS AGO Parisse alley-oop magic sets up brilliant… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyWrinkle Remedy Stuns TV Judges: Forget Surgery, Do This Once DailySmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items With A Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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first_imgSave this picture!Courtesy of Avignon-Clouet Architectes+ 13 Share Projects France “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/325035/down-up-house-avignon-clouet-architectes Clipboard Area:  50 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project CopyAbout this officeAvignon-Clouet ArchitectesOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesWoodHousesFrancePublished on February 03, 2013Cite: “Down Up House / Avignon-Clouet Architectes” 03 Feb 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodWood Siding in KSR Villa BodrumPlasticsMitrexSolar SidingMetal PanelsAurubisOxidized Copper: Nordic BrownEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesCupa PizarrasCupaclad® 101 Random in Les PalmiersUrban ApplicationsIsland Exterior FabricatorsPublic Safety Answering Center II Envelope SystemConcreteKrytonConcrete Hardening – Hard-CemSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylights – Ridgelight 25-40°Porcelain StonewareGrespaniaPorcelain Tiles – Coverlam ImperialWindowspanoramah!®ah! Vertical SlidingFastenersSchöckConcrete Façade Fasteners – Isolink®CarpetsFabromont AGTextile Floor Covering – Arena®CoatingsFormicaLaminate – ColorCore®2More products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream ArchDaily 2011 Down Up House / Avignon-Clouet Architectescenter_img Architects: Avignon-Clouet Architectes Area Area of this architecture project Down Up House / Avignon-Clouet ArchitectesSave this projectSaveDown Up House / Avignon-Clouet Architectes CopyHouses•France ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/325035/down-up-house-avignon-clouet-architectes Clipboard Save this picture!Courtesy of Avignon-Clouet ArchitectesText description provided by the architects. A long wooded corridor lined with services (laundry, bathroom, dressing, toilets) leads to panoramic bedrooms overhanging the garden, via two hidden stairs.Save this picture!Courtesy of Avignon-Clouet ArchitectesBetween these two volumes is inserted a room opened outwards. To create the interface with the current house, the new volume is completely glazed. It  gives the impression of a levitating architecture that wouldn’t dare resting on the ground of this limited landscape area.Save this picture!Courtesy of Avignon-Clouet ArchitectesBut most of all, the extension of this raised ground floor flat, from a 19th century’s building, is an exploit! Indeed, the access between the street and the garden was unthinkable with a narrow corridor ending in square angle and a partly buried extension . Without the strong will of the architect and the builder to take up the challenge, this project would never have emerged.Save this picture!SectionProject gallerySee allShow lessUrban Park of Palouriotissa Third Prize Winning Proposal / Groundlab + Clara OlorizArticlesNew Law Courts of Caen Competition Entry / be baumschlager eberleArticles Share “COPY” Year:  Houseslast_img read more

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 21 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 2 August 2000 | News Scottish charity law Web site launched The Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) has launched the Scottish charity law consultation Web site. It is an online consultation system for voluntary organisations across Scotland to give their views on the key issue of charity law reformThe Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) has launched the Scottish charity law consultation Web site. It is an online consultation system for voluntary organisations across Scotland to give their views on the key issue of charity law reform.Apart from the need for a modern definition of charity, issues already identified by the sector include the absence of adequate fundraising regulations, the lack of a register of charities in Scotland, and advice and ./guidance needed by voluntary managers. Advertisement Scottish charities can contribute their views at the Scottish charity law consultation Web site. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis read more

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first_img Organizers of the Indiana Small Farm Conference remind farmers that it’s never too early to gain new insights ahead of the growing season.“The longer and busier days will be here soon enough,” says Tamara Benjamin, assistant agriculture and natural resources program leader and diversified agriculture specialist for Purdue Extension and a conference organizer. “The Indiana Small Farm Conference is a great way to learn what’s new and what’s next in production, marketing and other areas to make the most of your efforts in 2021 and for years to come.”Featuring keynote speakers Richard Perkins and Dan and Julie Perkins, the ninth annual conference and trade show will take place March 4-6, with live and on-demand content delivered through the interactive Microsoft Teams application. All content will remain available to participants after the conference is over.Registration is open, and the fee to attend all three days of the conference is $35 per person. This year’s conference offers several tracks, from which attendees can choose sessions that best align with their farming operations and goals:Advanced Livestock, with a focus on pasture renovation and management, as well as breakout sessions on beef, goats, sheep and poultry.Advanced Vegetable Production, with panels on leafy greens, soil health and cover crops, and on-demand crop-update/growing technique content.Beginning Farmer, which will help newcomers set themselves up for success through sessions on developing farm stands and diversifying enterprises.Farm Business & Marketing Plans, with suggestions from successful vendors to increase sales, presentations on e-commerce and tax benefits and more.Regenerative Agriculture, featuring a grower panel and a presentation by Ray “The Soil Guy” Archuleta, a soil scientist with over 30 years of experience.Urban Agriculture, with a variety of sessions covering urban farms, soil health, pest management and community engagement.A youth track will offer sessions on careers in agriculture and small farms to middle school and high school audiences. On March 5, an Exploring Agriculture and Small Farm Careers panel will showcase interactive discussions about careers in horticulture, organic farming, livestock farming, agricultural entrepreneurship and more. Saturday’s Show-and-Tell sessions will feature presentations on beekeeping, horticulture, livestock management and more. The Purdue Ag Ambassadors and Purdue chapter of Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) will discuss their collegiate agriculture experiences.“It’s exciting to see the next generation, including Purdue Agriculture students, take the lead on Saturday,” Benjamin says. “The future of farming depends on inspiring young people to consider what they can achieve now and in the years ahead.”The Purdue Extension Farm Stress Team also will provide pre-recorded on-demand videos and resources related to mental health, including resources specifically related to the COVID-19 pandemic.“With the unique challenges of 2020 added to existing stress for agriculture professionals, it was essential to offer focused content about mental health and well-being,” Benjamin says.The 2021 Indiana Small Farm Conference begins March 4, with on-demand availability for virtual tours of such Indiana farms as Four Flags Farm, Freedom Valley Farm and Maple Hills Farm. Testimonials from farmers about how they have persevered through COVID-19 also will be available on demand.Keynote speakers for the 2021 conference are:Richard Perkins (12:30-1:30 p.m. EST, March 5) is the co-owner, director and lead designer of Ridgedale Farm AB in Värmland, Sweden, author of the internationally renowned Regenerative Agriculture, and producer of the series “Making Small Farms Work.” Blending dynamic instruction and down-to-earth pragmatism, he promotes a philosophy of permaculture in farming — design strategies to capitalize on patterns and resilient features in natural ecosystems. He will discuss how focusing on regenerative agriculture can empower small farm enterprises to be resilient, entrepreneurial and profitable.Dan and Julie Perkins (12:30-1:30 p.m. EST, March 6) operate Perkins’ Good Earth Farm, an organic vegetable farm on 20 acres in DeMotte. After balancing a career in soil and water conservation with farming on the side, the Perkins family made a transition to full-time farming in 2019. Dan and Julie will discuss their experiences in “the beautiful, sometimes chaotic, get-your-hands-dirty, oh-so-satisfying working of the land.”Vendors also can participate in a virtual trade show, for which they will receive their own designated channel to engage with attendees for the entirety of the conference. Vendor registration is $70, which includes access to all conference sessions. Vendors interested in exhibiting can sign up here.Due to the popularity of the Indiana Small Farm Conference, credit card payment is strongly recommended. Attendees will receive Microsoft Teams login information for the conference only after payment is received.If you have a question about registration, email [email protected] you require special accommodations to participate in the conference, or have questions about the conference itself, email [email protected] or call 765-494-8490.A detailed conference schedule will be available several days before the event, and currently scheduled sessions are subject to change. For more information, or to sign up, visit the Indiana Small Farm Conference website.Follow the conference on Twitter and Instagram at @SmallFarmPurdue or on Facebook at @PurdueExtensionSmallFarms, with the hashtag #PurdueSmallFarms. Previous articleThe Hoosier Ag Today Podcast for January 28, 2021Next articleNational Farm Machinery Show and Championship Tractor Pull Postpones Until 2022 Purdue University News Service Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Prep for the 2021 Season With the Indiana Small Farm Conference SHARE By Purdue University News Service – Jan 28, 2021 SHARE Facebook Twitter Prep for the 2021 Season With the Indiana Small Farm Conferencelast_img read more

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first_imgFacebook Breaking barriers: Trailblazing women in sports media ReddIt TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Linkedin printChancellor Victor Boschini announced in an email Friday that May Commencement ceremonies would be postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic and celebrated Saturday, Aug. 8.In a video sent to the Class of 2020, Boschini said the university did consider a virtual ceremony but decided against it. ReddIt Alexa Hines World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Alexa Hineshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexa-hines/ “After thoughtful consideration of our options, we felt it was most important to host commencement for our students, Horned Frog families, and for our community, a celebration of academic achievement in TCU’s grand tradition,” Boschini said in his email.“When I first started watching the video, I immediately started sobbing. I’m so happy.”Senior pathology major Claire Simpson.Hundreds of people emailed, texted and called Chancellor Boschini regarding the commencement ceremony.“[This is] definitely the best option,” said senior communication major Lauren Working. “I have friends who go to schools that made it virtual. At least we get to say our goodbyes and walk across that stage.”Working said postponing graduation allows students to have the celebration they deserve. “I’m very proud of Boschini for handling this unprecedented situation with integrity and compassion,” she said. Even though Commencement will be rescheduled, the Class of 2020 will still be able to participate in the Senior Toast, which has been rescheduled to Friday, Aug. 7. This TCU tradition is a casual dinner with Boschini where he offers graduating seniors a formal toast and giveaway prizes.“TCU truly is a special place,” said senior speech pathology major Lindsay Tretton. “Their commitment to the Class of 2020 means the world to me.”The details of the ceremonies are still to be determined. TCU’s Registrar’s Office will email all spring graduates asking for their RSVP to attend by June 30.For more details on the new Commencement date, go to TCU’s Commencement website. + posts Facebook TCU Graduation (photo courtesy of TCUcommencement.com center_img Dickies Arena to open doors this week Alumnus to reopen local bar Tunnel of Oppression highlights different groups, encourages change Previous articleHoroscope: March 26, 2020Next articleHoroscope: March 27, 2020 Alexa Hines RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Alexa Hineshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexa-hines/ Twitter Alexa Hineshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexa-hines/ Linkedin Twitter Alexa Hineshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexa-hines/ Alexa is the Audience Engagement Editor for TCU360. She is a journalism major and Spanish minor from Orange County, California. In her free time, Alexa loves reading about and watching sports. Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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first_imgNews June 2, 2021 Find out more SlovakiaEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsEvents ImpunityPredators News RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive Marian Kočner and Alena Zsuzsová, charged with ordering and contracting the murder of an Aktuality.sk journalist, have been acquitted by the Special Criminal Court. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) expected Slovakia to set a positive example regarding the prosecution and condemnation of crimes against journalists. Instead, the case remains in the situation of impunity. February 4, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information September 3, 2020 RSF: The acquittal of the accused mastermind of Ján Kuciak’s murder is a huge failure of Slovakia’s law enforcement bodies News RSF_en to go furthercenter_img Slovak premier visits RSF, encouraged to turn his country into “press freedom model for Europe” News Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU Receive email alerts Follow the news on Slovakia Marian Kočner (Vladimír Šimíček / AFP). SlovakiaEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsEvents ImpunityPredators After the verdict of Slovakia’s Special Criminal Court, the mastermind of the murder of the journalist Ján Kuciak and his fiancée Martina Kušnírová remains unknown. On September 3, the Court acquitted Marian Kočner, charged with ordering the killing of the Aktuality.sk investigative reporter, and Alena Zsuzsová, his associate, accused of contracting the murder. The third person tried in the case, Tomáš Szabó, was sentenced to 25 years in prison for participating at the murder.“The verdict is shocking. The acquittal of the accused mastermind and intermediary is evidence of a huge failure of the investigation bodies and the judiciary,” said Pavol Szalai, Head of RSF’s EU/Balkans Desk. “We expected Slovakia to set a positive example in the prosecution and condemnation of the crimes against journalists. Instead, we remain in a situation of impunity.” Although the Court has admitted that Ján Kuciak was indeed killed because of his work, it has ruled that “not a single direct proof of Marian Kočner’s guilt was presented”. All proofs against the businessman presented by the special prosecutor and collected by the police were indirect. Seeking new evidence will be difficult, since the special police team investigating the murder had already been disbanded, a decision criticised by RSF as premature. The prosecutor, who requested a 25-year prison term for all three accused, has already filed an appeal, which will be examined by the Slovak Supreme Court. Two verdicts were previously pronounced in the affair. Miroslav Marček admitted to shooting the couple – assisted by his cousin Tomáš Szabó – and was found guilty last April. His 23-year prison sentence is not in force yet, as the prosecutor appealed, asking for 25 years. Zoltán Andruskó, who has cooperated with the police since his arrest, pleaded guilty and was sentenced in December 2019 to 15 years in prison for passing on the order to Miroslav Marček and Tomáš Szabó. Both Alena Zsuzsová and Marian Kočner will remain in detention. Last February, the press freedom predator was sentenced to 19 years in prison for forging promissory notes in an attempt to extort 69 million euros from the country’s biggest commercial channel, TV Markíza. He appealed and is now awaiting a new trial. Out of 180 countries, Slovakia is ranked 33rd in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index. Organisation December 2, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribe 2020-05-29 Seth Welborn About Author: Seth Welborn May 29, 2020 1,169 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Mortgage Servicers to Advance $3.6B to Mortgage-Backed Securities Share Save in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Sign up for DS News Daily Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Mortgage Servicers to Advance $3.6B to Mortgage-Backed Securities The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Related Articles The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: SFR’s Place in the Housing Market Next: Will Housing Lead Post-Pandemic Recovery? Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer.  Print This Post Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Volumes of forbearance plans have flattened, according to new data from Black Knight. As of May 26, 4.76 million homeowners are in forbearance plans, with a net increase of just 7,000 new forbearance plans since last week.At these levels, mortgage servicers need to advance a combined $3.6 billion a month to holders of government-backed mortgage securities on COVID-19-related forbearances. That’s on top of the $1.5 billion in T&I payments they must make on behalf of borrowers.P&I advance payments have been capped at four months for servicers of GSE-backed mortgages. Given today’s number of loans in forbearance, servicers of GSE-backed loans still face up to $8.8 billion in advances over that four-month period.According to a survey from LendingTree, most homeowners who have been approved for a mortgage forbearance may not need one. Of the 25% of homeowners surveyed that applied, 80% were approved for a forbearance. However, while the majority of people who applied were approved, only 5% said they wouldn’t have been able to pay their mortgage without forbearance. Another 72% of those who received forbearance reported feeling at least a little guilty about it.Those who applied for forbearance differed along with gender, generational, and income divides. In general, women were less likely to apply for forbearance than men, with 10.2% of women and 37.8% of men surveyed applying because of the coronavirus pandemic. While men were far more likely to apply than women, approval rates between the genders were similar, with 75% of women and 81% of men being approved.Of all the generations, millennials and Gen Xers were more likely to say that they wanted a break from payments. Notably, 71% of respondents from these age groups said they could’ve made their payment but just wanted a pause. An average of only 4.3% of millennials and Gen Xers said they wouldn’t have been able to pay their mortgages without forbearance.While fewer baby boomers applied for forbearance, as older homeowners are more likely to own their homes outright or are closer to paying off their mortgages, those who did were in much greater need. In fact, 20% of baby boomers said they needed forbearance to avoid missing their monthly payment. The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agolast_img read more

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first_imgMartin Holverda/iStockBY: CAMMERON PARRISH, ABC NEWS(DALLAS) — Two of Texas’ biggest cities are reporting an uptick in COVID-19 cases over the past several days as concerns mount over how protests sparked by the death of George Floyd may be increasing the spread of the virus.Dallas County announced an additional 298 positive cases of the novel coronavirus on Friday, according to Dallas County Health and Human Services, bringing the total number of cases in the county to 11,541. Meanwhile, the city of Houston, in Harris County, announced there were 180 new cases on Thursday, bringing the total number of cases in the city to 8,231. There have been over 13,600 cases in Harris County, most in the state.The total announced Friday in Dallas County was the highest single-day amount of cases since the start of the pandemic. The previous high came just one day earlier, on Thursday.“We’re seeing the numbers increasing. They’re not increasing exponentially, but they’re increasing linearly in time with the same steady pace,” said Dr. David Persse, medical director for the Houston Fire Department. “So the optimizations are in fact, increasing our case counts.”Dallas County also said that over 80% of workers who tested positive for the virus have been critical infrastructure workers who worked in commonly affected sectors such as health care, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders and other essential functions.County Judge Clay Jenkins, the county’s top elected official, discussed the concerns of protesters becoming infected with the virus — as well as police officers.“I am concerned about the officers when I see 100 people shoulder to shoulder in a deal where we have COVID, which we have no immunity for and it’s spreading through our community,” said Jenkins. “That’s a concern.”Persse cautioned that the recent protests were unlikely to be the cause if there’s a prolonged spike in cases.“If it stays at this, this sort of same rate of increase, then I definitely won’t say you can blame the protests,” Persse said. “If anything, it’s going to be the reopening of society and people becoming fatigued, if you will, with the precautions we’ve asked them to take.”Texas Gov. Greg Abbott issued an executive order June 3 for the state to move into phase three of reopening, allowing many business and activities to resume. The state has recorded over 71,000 cases and at least 1,788 deaths since the start of the pandemic, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgABC News(BOXTON, Tenn.) — When her father died, Linda Hayes said his last request to her was to take care of the vegetable garden he grew for his community at his home in Boxtown, Tennessee.“Two weeks before he passed away, he told me, he said, ‘I’m ready to go be with Jesus, I’m ready to go home. I want you and your sisters to take care of the garden.’” Hayes told ABC News. “I said, ‘OK, Daddy, all right,’ and I know that was my charge.”Hayes still lives in the house her father built in Boxtown, a predominately Black neighborhood in Memphis with railway tracks running through the center. Historically, the community was one of the few places where Black Americans could buy their own land — a reason, Hayes said, that the garden was so sacred to her family.“When slaves were freed, they migrated to Boxtown, and the reason why they call it Boxton is because many of the homes were made out of boxes from the trains,” Hayes said.But a proposed 49-mile crude oil pipeline connecting a refinery in Memphis to an existing pipeline in Marshall County, Mississippi, now threatens to cut through Boxtown, spurring allegations of environmental racism from community members including Hayes.The underground pipeline, dubbed the Byhalia Connection, is a joint venture by Plains All American and Valero Energy Corporation. The current planned route would traverse the Memphis aquifer, the city’s water source, which critics say poses a risk to drinking water in the event of a leak.The pipeline could also impact the property values in the neighborhood, residents say, and is the latest in a spate of industrial projects including an oil refinery, a coal ash pond and many more that have been put in their backyard over the past several decades.“This community is standing up and saying no more, we’ve had enough,” Kathy Robinson, a fourth-generation resident of the area, told ABC News. “For the past 50 years, this specific community in Memphis has received whatever the rest of Memphis and Shelby County would dare not accept in other places.”“We know that this is environmental racism,” Robinson added. “They purposely picked communities where they think that there will be no one that’s willing to fight them.”This time, she said, “We’re saying ‘no.’”The ‘path of least resistance’Congressman Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., told ABC News that a representative of the pipeline company previously told the community they chose the route “because it was the ‘path of least resistance.’”“That makes you wonder whether they’re just figuring that the African-American community has less influence, less strength,” Cohen said.In a February letter, Cohen urged the Biden administration to direct the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to rescind its permits for the pipeline. Cohen cited the historic nature of communities including Boxtown as well its potential to contaminate the Memphis aquifer.Cohen said he has not heard back from the administration.The Biden administration did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment. The USACE declined ABC News’ request for comment, citing ongoing litigation as three local environmental groups have filed a lawsuit over the issuing of the permits.“What should have been said is that we looked for the path with the fewest collective impacts,” said Katie Martin, a spokeswoman for the Byhalia Connection, in response to a request for clarification on the “path of least resistance” comment.“We treat our landowners and our neighbors with respect and dignity, and we look forward to working with the community members for years to come,” Martin added.Martin said the pipeline route was chosen “very carefully and deliberately” — avoiding properties with homes on them and emphasizing that “this pipeline is not about race, it’s about safety.”She added that pipelines and aquifers “coexist safely across the country,” noting that they currently have a pipeline “operating safely on top of the Memphis Sands aquifer and we expect that our pipeline will be no different.”Pipeline operators have said the construction will support some 500 direct and indirect jobs in the area, as well as provide more than $3 million in local tax revenue along the route each year. Moreover, they say they have provided a slew of charitable grants to non-profit organizations that serve communities along the route, according to a website set up to provide the public with information on the project.The website states they are targeting to start construction this year and aims to be in service approximately nine months after construction starts.‘It’s more prone to contamination’The groundwater pulled from the Memphis aquifer is thousands of years old, according to Brian Waldron, a professor of civil engineering and the director of the Center for Applied Earth Science and Engineering at the University of Memphis.Waldron said the current proposed path through south Memphis traverses a shallow groundwater system.“It’s not protected by clay,” he said. “It’s more prone to contamination.”Even along the parts of the route where there is that protective clay layer, Waldron said a leak could still potentially impact the drinking water.“This protective clay layer has naturally occurring holes in it called breeches, and that allows for water of poor quality to more readily exchange itself with our drinking water supply,” he said.Another risk is “the fact that we are in an earthquake zone, a seismic zone,” Waldron added, “the threat of that to underground infrastructure is of concern.”There are a lot of pipelines already in the area, he noted, but making sure that there will be no leaks and no impact to the water system is still of paramount concern for Memphis residents.“I have suggested to Byhalia and others that if you really want to know what’s going on in the subsurface, whatever path you take, you should do a study to make sure that there’s no immediate threats in proximity to the pipeline,” he said.Martin told ABC News that they have spent “over ten thousand hours” in the field, “studying and understanding the local geology in the area.”She expressed confidence the pipeline will not pose a threat to the drinking water, saying they have consulted with experts and complied with all requirements necessary for environmental permits.“And because of that, we secured our environmental permits at the state and federal level,” Martin said.‘We’re really the path of resilience’Justin Pearson, a native of Southwest Memphis, said he believes that “for a multibillion dollar company” to call a poor and predominantly Black community, “‘the path of least resistance,’ is for them to tell the truth about what they believe about our people.”Census data shows that the median income in the ZIP code housing Boxtown is $30,103, and the population is 96.5% Black.Pearson, along with Robinson, is one of the co-founders of the grassroots group Memphis Community Against the Pipeline (MCAP). The collective was formed last October following community meetings with representatives of the pipeline company. MCAP is one of the three groups suing the Army Corp of Engineers over the permits for the pipeline.Pearson said he believes environmental racism is the result of “decisions that are being made by policy makers to really determine whose lives are expendable in our country.”“The folks whose lives have been the most expendable have been people of color, indigenous communities and the descendants of enslaved people in our country,” Pearson said. “That’s the case right here in Memphis, in Boxtown.”“There are ramifications for that racism,” he added. “The ramifications for that are in the stories of people like me — both my grandmothers passed away in their 60s due to cancer.”A 2013 study from the University of Memphis found that carcinogens in the southwest Memphis air raised the cumulative cancer risk in the area to four times higher than the national average.“For Black folks, it’s a slow form of lynching,” Pearson said of environmental racism. “Our present fight is very much connected to previous fights and struggles that those who come before us fought in order for us to be here.”“They called our community the path of least resistance,” Pearson said. “And we’re showing them that we’re really the path of resilience.”Hayes said the pollutants in the area posed a challenge for her late father’s vegetable garden, which is why he would wake up early in the morning to work on it before going to his job as a truck driver.In 2010, Hayes’ father was diagnosed with lung cancer. He died a few years later in 2014.“There is there is no amount of money that can replace what my dad said to me two weeks before he passed away,” Hayes told ABC News.“There are a lot of promises, but we don’t want to take any chances of our community being destroyed, especially our water,” she added.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_img Tags: NBA/Oklahoma City Thunder/Playoffs/Utah Jazz Associated Press April 21, 2018 /Sports News – Local Rubio’s triple-double leads Jazz past Thunder 115-102 Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Ricky Rubio had 26 points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists for Utah’s first playoff triple-double in 17 years, and Donovan Mitchell added 22 points to lead the Jazz to a 115-102 win over the Oklahoma City Thunder on Saturday night and a 2-1 lead in their first-round series.Joe Ingles, who had 21 points, made two 3-pointers around two free throws to spark a 13-0 surge that ended on Mitchell’s 3 to put Utah up by 20 points in the fourth quarter. The big run was just par for the course in a series characterized by large runs by one team, then countered by the other.Rubio’s triple-double was the first by a Jazz player in the postseason since John Stockton in the 2001 playoffs against Dallas.Paul George scored 23 points and Carmelo Anthony, Russell Westbrook and Raymond Felton each had 14 for the Thunder. Westbrook also had 11 rebounds and nine assists, just missing his ninth playoff triple-double but also had eight turnovers and shot 5 for 17.Gobert’s dunk and pair of free throws capped a 9-0 run in the third quarter to give Utah an 84-70 lead. Minutes later, Rubio hit a running 28-foot 3-pointer to make it 89-75 entering the final period.The Jazz changed coverages on Westbrook throughout the game and surprised the perennial All-Star with different players in his expected passing lanes.Utah also outrebounded the Thunder 48-33 and seemed much quicker to the loose balls in the midst of a charged atmosphere. The Jazz’s hustle plays energized the packed arena festooned in the colors of Southern Utah – red, orange and yellow.With Utah trailing 47-43, Rubio scored 10 consecutive Jazz points and his 3-pointer and subsequent three free throws gave Utah a 53-49 lead. The point guard walked toward half-court with his arms outstretched, drinking in the deafening roar and subsequent “RU-BI-O! RU-BI-O!” chants from the fans.Rubio, playing just his third playoff game in his seven-year NBA career, had 19 at the half and the Jazz led 58-53.The Thunder, shot 16 for 24 on field goals and 7 for 11 on 3s, to lead 45-33 on Westbrook’s layup with 7:26 left in the second quarter.TIP-INSThunder: Oklahoma City was outscored 30-14 after Adams sat down with his third foul early in the second quarter. … Both Adams and Mitchell picked up their fourth fouls in the first half of the third quarter. … Adams finished with two rebounds. … The Thunder shot 14 for 28 from 3-point range.Jazz: Utah started the game by converting nine of its first 10 shots, then missed eight of the next nine. … Royce O’Neale and George got double-technicals for some pushing and words early in the fourth quarter. … Carlos Boozer had the last triple-double for the Jazz in 2008, but it came in the regular season. … Utah had 19 second-chance points to the Thunder’s eight.UP NEXTGame 4 is Monday night in Salt Lake City.last_img read more

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