first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement The captivating looks on the runway were accentuated by makeup from the beautyBOUTIQUE™ by Shoppers Drug Mart and award-winning hairstylist and nail expert Victoria Radford.The RE/SET™ Designer Showroom opened today, featuring Canadian designers in a consumer-facing market space located on the upper level of Yorkville Village. From 12 – 9 PM daily, both the public and Toronto Fashion Week guests have the opportunity to meet and shop directly from designers including Grayes, Biko, Dolorous, Alan Anderson andCuchura, who joined presenting designers Christopher Bates, Pedram Karimi andHilary MacMillan.A selection of hi-res images can be accessed here. Photo credit: George Pimentel.ABOUT TORONTO FASHION WEEK®Toronto Fashion Week®, an event showcasing fashion, art, music and culture takes place in Yorkville, Toronto’s revitalized and most prestigious luxury retail neighborhood. The bi-annual event hosts national and international designers, entertainers and the fashion community to create a touchpoint where fashion is embraced and celebrated. As the leading fashion event in Canada, Toronto Fashion Week creates a catalyst for media engagement, retail activity and global connectivity.The founding partners are Yorkville Village, The Hazelton Hotel, Freed Developments and Hill & Gertner – an ownership group comprised of several of the country’s top companies in real estate, development and luxury hospitality.Website:         torontofashionweek.toInstagram:      @tfwTwitter:           @tofashionwkFacebook:      @tofashionwkHashtag:         #tofwABOUT THE COLLECTIONS™THE COLLECTIONS™ is a Toronto-based fashion production agency, managing award-winning designers and provides like-minded partners an opportunity to collaborate with rising talent. Recognized as an industry leader, THE COLLECTIONS™ has established a strong track record for launching emerging talent and positioning designers for international success. As a continued effort to provide a platform for emerging talent and create a positive impact within the community, THE COLLECTIONS™ created RE\SET™ in February 2017.Website:          reset.fashionInstagram:      @resetfsnHashtag:         #resetfsnABOUT CAFA™CAFA™ (The Canadian Arts & Fashion Awards) was created to celebrate outstanding achievement and emerging talent in the Canadian fashion industry. Mandated to grow a stronger appreciation of Canadian talent both at home and abroad, the goal of CAFA™ as a national platform is to foster the next generation of Canadian talent through an annual awards show and year-round economic development initiatives.CAFA™ hosted its fourth annual red-carpet Awards show on Friday, April 7th, 2017 – a unique evening that united Canadian talent and fashion influencers from all over the world. Honouring designers, models, image makers, stylists, and influencers, CAFA™ has established itself as a premier event in the Canadian fashion industry.Website:         cafawards.caInstagram:      @cafawardsFacebook:      /cafawardsABOUT FASHION TALKS™Fashion Talks™ is the podcast that observes the world through the lens of fashion. Founded in 2017, creator and host Donna Bishop interviews designers, stylists, academics, industry insiders and leaders outside of the fashion industry to reveal insights, observations, personal stories and historical moments on how fashion helps to shape the world we live in and how our world shapes fashion and the clothes we wear. Fashion Talks™ is available for download on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and to stream at fashiontalks.ca. While the majority of listeners are from Canada and the US, Fashion Talks boasts regular listeners from Japan, Germany, France, Italy and the UK. Proudly produced in partnership with CAFA, Fashion Talks™ strives to shine a spotlight on the cultural relevance of fashion while highlighting the rich expanse of the Canadian industry.Website:         fashiontalks.caInstagram:      @fashiontalkspodcastFacebook:      /fashiontalkspodcastHastags:         #fashiontalks Twitter TORONTO, ON – On Day One of Toronto Fashion Week®, top Canadian designers sent models down the runway to showcase their curated Fall/Winter 2018 collections.Set inside the city’s premier luxury retail destination, Yorkville Village (55 Avenue Rd.), the day kicked off with Fashion Talks™, produced in partnership with CAFA™. Host Donna Bishop chatted with Gersha Phillips, Star Trek Discovery’s Costume Designer about Fashion and Designing for the Future. Narces at Toronto Fashion Week. Photo credit: George Pimentel. Christopher Bates at Toronto Fashion Week. Photo credit: George Pimentel. Donna Bishop (L) and Gersha Phillips (R), Star Trek Discovery’s Costume Designer chat about Fashion and Designing for the Future during the live taping of Fashion Talks™. Photo credit: George Pimentel. Designer Ross Mayer (centre) showcases his first men’s collection in the RE\SET™ Studio at Toronto Fashion Week. Photo credit: George Pimentel. Eleventy at Toronto Fashion Week. Photo credit: George Pimentel. Triarchy at Toronto Fashion Week. Photo credit: George Pimentel. UNTTLD at Toronto Fashion Week. Photo credit: George Pimentel. Toronto Fashion Week F/W 2018 (CNW Group/Toronto Fashion Week) In the studio, Mayer Man showcased a static presentation of Ross Mayer’s very first men’s collection. Offering a sophisticated perspective on classic street style looks, the collection focused on pants, outerwear and textured suits. First to hit the runway was Italian-designer, Eleventy followed by sustainable Canadian denim brand Triarchy, who put on an eco-friendly show centered on high-quality pieces built to last. Each look incorporated trendier twists, patchwork, fringe and linen prints. UNTTLD’s jewel-toned collection offered a mix of romantic volume and textures juxtaposed with strong shoulders.NARCES put on a show-stopper with elegant pieces that drew inspiration from the 70s and early 80s era. Ending the night was fashion powerhouse Christopher Bates who showcased his distinct looks, which incorporated textured fabrics and structured tailored suits offering a modern take on classic styles. Advertisementcenter_img Login/Register With: Facebook UNTTLD at Toronto Fashion Week.Photo credit: George Pimentel. Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgBetween 1955 and 1985, more than 20,000 Indigenous children were taken from their mothers and placed inside the child-welfare system. The devastation and trauma resulting from what came to be known as the “Sixties Scoop” is incalculable, although the story isn’t entirely without a happy ending—or four. In the NFB’s Birth of a Family, we’re introduced to three sisters and one brother, all in their 50s, who gather together for the first time during a weeklong trip to Banff. Betty Ann Adam calls it “the best-ever vacation/photo album anybody ever had”.“All four of us were fortunate in that we were all placed, some of us immediately, some of us eventually, in stable homes that made us part of their families,” she tells the Straightin a call from Saskatoon. But this wasn’t the case for many, and Betty Ann further acknowledges that her own family summit pivots, with often gutting effect for the viewer, between joy and grief. (This movie is a weeper, for sure.) “Certainly, we’re all aware, as [brother] Ben expressed very poignantly, that we missed a lot,” she says. Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgAdvertisement Facebook Jacob Tremblay is a huge fan of Keanu Reeves, so much so that one of Reeves’ iconic films was an inspiration for a scene in “Good Boys”.The 12-year-old Canadian cutie chatted with Vulture about his new R-rated comedy, revealing “The Matrix” helped him prepare for the paintball fight scene in the movie. Login/Register With: Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Jacob Tremblay (REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni) Twitterlast_img

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first_imgAPTN National NewsAboriginal fishers in Manitoba are protesting against the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation — an entity similar to the Canadian Wheat Board that markets and sells Canadian fish abroad.They’re looking to the provincial government for support, but the province says it’s a federal issue.APTN National News reporter Meagan Fiddler has the story.last_img

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first_imgAPTN National NewsAboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan doesn’t testify before the Aboriginal affairs committee very often, but when he does, committee members expect answers.Some are saying that the minister’s appearance this week was less than stellar.A minister’s appearance before committee is a time to show that he is on top of the issues and their department.Did Duncan show that this week.Everyone on APTN National News’ political panel was at that meeting.last_img

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first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA-–The “permanent legacy” of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is at risk and a complete record of the Indian residential school system may never materialize if the current disorder surrounding the handling and transferring of historical documents continues, according to the Auditor General of Canada.In Auditor General Michael Ferguson’s spring 2013 report, his office found that nearly three years after the work began and with a year left before the money runs out, no one knows how much it will cost to gather all the historical documents, who will pay for it or what materials are even “relevant” for the project.The report found that the TRC and the federal department of Aboriginal Affairs had failed to find “common ground” on the transfer of historical documents from Ottawa’s vaults.“We concluded that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada had not taken adequate steps in relations to the creation of as complete a historical record as possible of the Indian residential school system and legacy,” said the report, in a section titled, Creating a Historical Record of Indian Residential Schools.The report found that the TRC and the federal department couldn’t agree on what constituted relevant documents, where to search, what time frames the documents would cover, what formats to use and who would pay for it all.“The scope of the undertaking is still undefined. Canada and the Commission need to cooperate in order to assess what has been accomplished, what remains to be done, how long this will take and what resources are required,” said the report.Both the TRC and Aboriginal Affairs agreed with the report’s findings and recommendations.The TRC and Aboriginal Affairs said they would jointly work to define “the work to be completed” and “develop a project plan for the provision of documents.”The Library and Archives Canada estimates that the total cost of gathering historical Indian Residential School documents could hit at least $40 million and take 10 years to find and digitize all the material. The documents are scattered across 24 departments and agencies and that, laid side by side, would stretch for about 20 kilometres or fill 69,000 boxes.The TRC has a total budget of $55 million, plus $8 million additionally for administrative costs. The TRC’s mandate ends in July 2014.Aboriginal Affairs told the Auditor General’s Office that it has obtained about $20 million to provide the documents, but $5 million of those funds could not be used as a result bureaucratic obstacles.The search for documents faced a rough initial start following the signing of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement in 2006. Despite the agreement including a section requiring Canada to provide “all relevant” documents to the commission, Ottawa failed to make one department responsible for coordinating and gathering the material. It wasn’t until February 2010 that the Clerk of the Privy Council tapped Aboriginal Affairs to lead the project.The TRC and Aboriginal Affairs, however, then failed to come to any conclusion on the definition of “relevant” documents, and the squabble eventually ended up in Federal Court. There were also disputes from other federal departments about their roles and responsibilities in tracking down Indian residential school documents for the TRC.Aboriginal Affairs at one point claimed that it had already found the relevant documents for the TRC, but based this assertion on documents it had compiled in relation to settling claims from individual Indian residential school survivors.“The department’s view was that most of the relevant residential school documents in Library and Archives Canada had already been collected,” said the Auditor General’s report. “There was no analysis from the department supporting that view.”The department then took the position that Canada’s responsibility did not include searching for additional archival documents and federal departments did not have to go digging for documents at Library and Archives Canada. It effectively transferred that responsibility to the TRC which “strongly disagreed” and held to its claim that the federal government’s responsibility included finding archived documents.The issue hit Federal Court and on Jan. 30, 2012, the court ruled that Canada’s obligation included documents held in the vaults of Library and Archives Canada.The Auditor General’s report also found that the TRC’s plan to create a national research centre to hold the estimated over one million residential school document has also been fraught with problems.Despite having selected an organization to handle this project in October 2012, the TRC had still not developed a “detailed plan to guide its work and resolve a number of issues affecting the transfer” of historical material. The report found that the TRC had not set “the terms and conditions of the agreement with the selected organization, the description of the historical record…or the process of transferring the documents…to the national research centre.”The TRC had also failed to obtain “disposition authority” from Library and Archives Canada, which is required by federal law, to dispose of its documents.The TRC said that it is developing a detailed plan and was in the process of having detailed discussions with the selected organization, federal government departments and the Manitoba government. The TRC said it was also in discussion with Library and Archives Canada to get disposition authority.“It remains to be seen what impacts the disagreements to date will have on achieving a fair, comprehensive and lasting resolution to the legacy of residential schools,” said the Auditor General’s report.news@aptn.ca@APTNNewslast_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National News OTTAWA–The UN special rapporteur on the rights of Indigenous peoples is scheduled to hold a press conference in Ottawa the day before the Harper government delivers its Throne Speech setting the agenda for the next parliamentary session.James Anaya is scheduled to appear on Oct. 15 at the National Press Theatre at the conclusion of his 9 day tour of Canada that will take him across the country from Ottawa to Vancouver, according an itinerary of his visit posted on the rapporteur’s website.Gov. Gen. David Johnston is scheduled to deliver the Harper government’s Throne Speech which is expected re-announce Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s commitment to have legislation governing First Nations education in place by next September.The passing of the First Nations Education Act into law is being described as one of Harper’s primary goals on the First Nation file. The proposed legislation is already facing resistance from First Nations leaders across the country.Anaya, who begins his tour next Monday, is scheduled to remain in Ontario for two days before heading to Quebec on Oct. 9.He is then scheduled to be in Vancouver the next day, Edmonton the day after and Winnipeg on Oct. 12. Anaya will then visit Saskatchewan before returning to Ontario on Oct. 14.Anaya had been requesting permission to visit since February 2012. He wrote the Harper government at least three times requesting he be allowed in on an official visit.Special rapporteurs that hold mandates from the UN Human Rights Council can’t enter countries without official consent.Anaya said in a March 2013 letter to the Union of BC Indian Chiefs that he was also considering finding unofficial channels to meet with Indigenous people in Canada if Ottawa continued to ignore his requests.news@aptn.calast_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National News OTTAWA–The recently formed Senate Liberal caucus plans to discuss the ongoing issue of murdered and missing Indigenous women during its first open caucus meeting next month.The 32 Senators once formed part of the Liberal caucus until Liberal leader Justin Trudeau banished them from the fold.Now freed from party discipline, these Senators plan to “make Parliament work better for Canadians, to make it respond to the needs of Canadians, rather than the needs of political parties and their leaders.”The Independent Senators plan to open up some of their caucus meetings to the public, turning them into forums on public policy issues that often go overlooked, said Sen. James Cowen, the leader of the Senate Liberal caucus.Their first open caucus meeting is planned for March 26 and will focus on discussions around the issue of murdered and missing Indigenous women.“This is an issue that has shocked the conscience of Canadians,” said Sen. Art Eggleton, who also referred to the ongoing search for Loretta Saunders, an Inuk university student from Labrador who went missing in Halifax.Eggleton said the caucus would be inviting speakers to the caucus to discuss the issue.The Senate Liberals will also be asking Canadians to submit questions for the Senators to use during the Senate’s question period, post their expenses on a separate website, make all votes free of party discipline and start an ongoing “national conversation” around equalization, where richer provinces help poorer provinces pay their bills.news@aptn.calast_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Tagish First Nation in the Yukon has launched a program to build new homes for residents.As Marty O’Brien reports, it is also giving people there the chance to gain new skills.last_img

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first_imgAPTN National NewsNews spread fast Wednesday of a young girl being attacked and left for dead in Winnipeg who was a ward of the state – housed in a hotel.It’s since been learned a 15-year-old boy has been charged for the attack.The province promised Wednesday to stop housing child welfare kids in hotels by June 1.As APTN’s Jaydon Flett reports it’s not the first time the Manitoba government has made that promise.last_img

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first_imgThe Canadian PressManitoba Premier Brian Pallister is suggesting the federal government could take over the Port of Churchill as one way to help revive the subarctic town’s broken rail line and economy.“The federal government has the responsibility for ports,” Pallister said Thursday. “They run dozens of them and maybe they could run one more.”Pallister has said he is hopeful the federal government will find a solution to the crisis facing Churchill, which lost its only ground connection to the outside world in the spring when flooding damaged the rail line.People and goods have had to be flown in at much higher cost, and the town of 900 residents on the coast of Hudson Bay fears a long-term economic hit.The railway and port used to be federally owned but were sold to Denver-based Omnitrax in 1997.Omnitrax closed the port’s grain terminal last year. Its biggest customer used to be the Canadian Wheat Board before the agency lost its monopoly on western wheat and barley sales.Omnitrax has been trying to sell the rail line and has said it cannot afford the repairs needed to get a 250-kilometre section of the line back up _ at an estimated cost of $43.5 million.Read more: Report says Churchill rail line could be repaired soon for $43 million or lessPallister said a revived port would help the viability of the rail line and the economy as a whole.“That is of great importance to the long-term sustainability of the community as it exists today and for northern development,” he said. “It’s a tremendous asset for the country of Canada, quite frankly.”Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in July that Omnitrax has a legal obligation to fix and operate the line. He did not directly answer when asked whether the government might sue Omnitrax.The company has been in talks with a First Nations consortium to sell the line. That could pave the way for government subsidies for repairs, but there is no sign of a deal.Pallister is not the only politician touting the idea of a federal takeover. New Democrat member of Parliament Niki Ashton, who represents the Churchill area, has called on Ottawa to nationalize both the port and the rail line.“We know the privatization experiment failed,” she said in a written statement last year.“It’s time to develop a model that benefits our North and Canada as a whole.”Contact APTN National News here: news@aptn.calast_img read more

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first_imgIn Vancouver, Hastings Street was closed so veterans and other dignitaries could march to the cenotaph. Traditional drummers greeted them as wreaths were laid to honour the war dead.“Our true respect for those who sacrificed before us,” said Mayor Gregor Robertson.Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, was there, too.“It’s just a reflection of what an amazing people Indigenous peoples are, and how selfless we are in terms of always rising to the occasion of being on the right side of history,” he said, “and fighting for the common good, so to speak.”Viviane Sandy brought her granddaughter to honour her late, great-uncle George Gilbert, who fought in the Second World War.  She says he suffered post-traumatic stress and had a hard time adjusting after he came home.“I remember as a child watching him cry, and my mother telling stories about how she would just wrestle and wrestle him when he would go through those triggers. My mother said she wouldn’t give up on him.”It has been documented that Aboriginal veterans were treated poorly upon their return to Canada. With the government stripping them of their Indian status and often barring them from entering their reserves to visit family and friends.Sandy says that happened to her great-uncle.“He didn’t get any medical help; he had to take care of himself. I remember he had a limp but he would still got to the woods and work.”Winnipeg is the site of the first Aboriginal Veterans Day – some 23 years ago.Here’s a look at the ceremonies held in Winnipeg. More than 12,000 Aboriginal men and women served the country through the First, Second and Korean wars.“I’m a proud Metis who has served in the military for 35 years,” said Beaudry. “Gave my time and service to protect our peoples in Canada.”Bill Greenwalt said the day is also for educating the youth of tomorrow.“It’s all part of that history that we have to make sure that we transfer down to our young people,” said the former member of the United States Marine Corps.Greenwalt, who served four years before moving to Canada, said he’s noticed a severe lack of mental health services for veterans – himself included.“Right now, whether it’s either Canada or the United States, there are 22 veterans a day committing suicide because of post-traumatic stress disorder,” Greenwalt said.“Do i want to get bitter about it? Yeah, I do want to get bitter about it. I don’t see Canada doing anything for our Afghanistan veterans.” Photo by Brittany HobsonBrittany Hobson Tina House APTN News A ceremony Wednesday marked the sacrifice of hundreds of Indigenous veterans from Manitoba – as well as thousands across Canada.It was National Aboriginal Veterans Day.“A lot of our Metis people and our First Nations people, when they came back from the wars, they got nothing,” said Sgt. Devin Beaudry of the Royal Canadian Air Force.“To be able to celebrate it on its separate day from everything else in Canada is an honour.”Beaudry was one of more than a hundred people who gathered in Winnipeg to pay their respects.Various ceremonies took place across the nation.Here’s a look at the ceremonies held in Vancouver.last_img read more

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first_imgWillow FiddlerAPTN NewsThe federal government is investing $16 million to complete an investment designed to keep First Nations students safe in Thunder Bay.Leaders who gathered for the announcement said it was years in the making.“It will help bring people together and that can only be a positive, not only for the Matawa students that will go here but for the people of Thunder Bay, the people in the neighborhood,” said Don Rusnak, the Liberal MP for Thunder Bay-Rainy River.“These are kids coming here for an education, to better their lives.”For students from the nine Matawa First Nations, the centre is a home away from home.The centre use to house a long-term care home before it closed its doors.In 2017, the city of Thunder Bay gifted it to Matawa First Nations.Now it’s being developed into an education and care centre for up to 200 students.And for the many people involved, including Matawa’s education manager, it’s personal.“This is not just a job for us, many of the staff that are here have lived that experience of leaving the north and coming to the city basically on their own,” said Sharon Nate.“It’s still happening today. It happened to my parents, it happened to myself, it happened to my child.”In 2018, Indigenous Services invested $1.9 million to start the development of the education and care centre.The push to have such a centre came from recommendations out of the student inquiry that looked into the deaths of seven First Nations students who died while attending school in Thunder Bay.The recommendations said students needed a residence, or living facility for students who come to the city away from their parents and communities.“This will go a long way in bridging those cultural divides in the city of Thunder Bay,” said Rusnak. “It’s just one step, it’s not the panacea, it’s not the answer but it’s an important and a big step in bridging those divides between communities here in Thunder Bay.”Andy Beaver is a Grade 12 student from Nibinamik says the new centre, which will have 100 beds and a fully equipped gym, can offer more for its students.“It’s completely different, you get to socialize more with students and teachers and they have cultural activities here as well as after-school programs,” said Beaver.“It’s a really good experience.”For now students use the centre for their studies and other programming.The project is expected to be completed in the fall of 2020.“It helps create safe space for their safety as well to keep things in check, I guess you can say,” said Beaver.wfiddler@aptn.ca@willowblasizzolast_img read more

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first_imgPORTAGE LA PRAIRIE, Man. – A major expansion project has been announced for a Manitoba potato-processing plant that’s expected to create about 90 new full-time jobs.J.R. Simplot Co. and the provincial government have outlined details of the $460-million expansion of the Portage la Prairie complex.A joint government-company release says the plant’s size will grow to nearly 43,000 square metres from about 17,000 square metres.Work is to start this spring and completion is set for the fall of 2019.The project, which is not expected to affect current operations, will more than double the plant’s need for potatoes from regional growers.Manitoba growers annually harvest about 2,630 hectares of potatoes — one-fifth of Canada’s total potato crop.The province is providing tax-increment financing of up to $6.3 million for capital investments and road improvements, along with about $522,000 in employee training contributions, based on the number of new positions.Manitoba Hydro is to provide $1 million for electrical and natural gas efficiency projects, based on the plant meeting guidelines of the Crown utility’s PowerSmart program.Simplot plans to incorporate similar industry-leading energy and water efficiencies first established at the company’s plant in Caldwell, Idaho.J.R. Simplot is headquartered in Boise, Idaho and has operations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand and China.It markets products to more than 40 countries.last_img read more

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first_imgEDMONTON – Premier Rachel Notley told business leaders from B.C. that legislation which could curtail oil flows to the west coast is about the long-term health of the entire country.Notley says her government doesn’t want to impose hardship on B.C. businesses and families, but says Alberta also must safeguard its interests.About 100 business leaders from B.C. flew over the Rockies to join 200 colleagues from the Edmonton and Calgary chambers to hear Notley speak in Edmonton.Val Litwin, with the B.C. Chamber of Commerce, says turning down the taps would not be received well in his province but says the legislation is focusing attention and spurring debate on the Trans Mountain pipeline.Notley’s government passed legislation this week that would allow it to intervene in the energy sector to reduce oil and natural gas exports to B.C. and elsewhere.The B.C. government has been fighting the expansion of the Trans Mountain line and Alberta’s legislation, if implemented, could lead to gasoline price spikes and other higher fuel fees in B.C.The Trans Mountain expansion, which has been approved by Ottawa, would triple the amount of oil flowing from Alberta to tankers on the B.C. coast.last_img read more

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first_imgSome of the most active companies traded Monday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (16,331.03, up 7.32 points)Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Healthcare. Up $1.11, or 17.08 per cent, to $7.61 on 30.6 million shares.Belo Sun Mining Corp. (TSX:BSX). Miner. Up two cents, or 11.76 per cent, to 19 cents on 17.5 million shares.Canopy Growth Corp. (TSX:WEED). Healthcare. Up $4.84, or 10.96 per cent, to $49.02 on 12.66 million shares.Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B). Aerospace, rail equipment. Down five cents, or 1.08 per cent, to $4.59 on 6.97 million shares.Nemaska Lithium Inc. (TSX:NMX). Miner. Up two cents, or 2.67 per cent, to 77 cents on 6.9 million shares.Aphria Inc. (TSX:APH). Healthcare. Up 79 cents, or 7.47 per cent, to $11.37 on 6.1 million shares.Kinross Gold Corp. (TSX:K). Miner. Down six cents, or 1.58 per cent, to $3.74 on 5 million shares.last_img read more

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first_imgLOS ANGELES — Movie sequels are having their own Thanksgiving feast at the box office.Studios on Sunday said the “Wreck-It Ralph” sequel “Ralph Breaks the Internet” has earned an estimated $55.7 million over the three-day weekend and $84.5 million since its Wednesday opening to top the North American charts.The Rocky spinoff “Creed II” has placed second with $35.3 million from the weekend and $55.8 million since Wednesday, far surpassing the first film’s Thanksgiving debut in 2015.There was little left at the table for the latest version of “Robin Hood,” starring Taron Egerton. The poorly reviewed pic grossed only $14.2 million in its first five days in theatres against a reported production budget of nearly $100 million.Lindsey Bahr, The Associated Presslast_img

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first_imgDAWSON CREEK, B.C. — The Dawson Creek chapter of 100 Women Who Care, the first chapter of the 100 Women movement to get set up in the Peace Region, will be hosting their fourth meeting this Thursday.The Dawson Creek chapter was co-founded by Annette Jalbert and Chante Patterson-Elden nearly two years ago. The group gets 100 or women to each give $100 to a pool, which is then donated to one of three charities that make a presentation during the group’s bi-annual meetings. On December 1st, 2016 the group hosted its Inaugural Gala which saw 186 women participate. The South Peace Seniors Access Service Society was the group’s first recipient, and received a donation of over $18,600. In April 2017, 216 members participated in the group’s second Gala, where The Ark – Dawson Creek Youth Centre Society received $21,600. The Network Ministries received $16,000 at the group’s third meeting last November. Organizers say that at this week’s meeting, the group will also be starting up registration for the Dawson Creek chapter of 100 Kids/Teens Who Care. The group will be holding registration this Thursday, with their inaugural meeting set to take place this fall.The Dawson Creek chapter of 100 Women Who Care will be meeting at the George Dawson Inn this Thursday, April 26th starting at 6:00 p.m.For more information, email the group at 100womendawsoncreek@gmail.com or call Annette at 250-784-4321 or Chante at 250-219-4403. You can also join their Facebook page.last_img read more

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first_imgKITIMAT, B.C. — The company behind a controversial natural gas pipeline in northern British Columbia says construction began in a number of places before archaeological assessments were complete.Coastal GasLink says an internal audit found there were two areas along the right of way east of Kitimat where land was cleared before archaeological impact assessments occurred.It says the assessments are conditions of the permits issued by the BC Oil and Gas Commission and the B.C. government’s Environmental Assessment Certificate. “I have directed the team to complete a thorough investigation of these incidents and have halted clearing work in the area until the investigation is complete and recommendations are put into practice,” Pfeiffer said in a statement Thursday.The Canadian Press Coastal GasLink says it has suspended all clearing activity in the area until an internal review is complete and actions are taken to prevent it from happening again.It says it has also notified affected Indigenous communities and welcomes their participation in post-impact assessments.The Coastal GasLink pipeline inspired global protests when hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation said it had no authority without their consent.The company says it had signed agreements with all 20 elected First Nations along the 670-kilometre route to LNG Canada’s export terminal on the coast in Kitimat, including the Wet’suwet’en council.It says the land cleared in the affected areas measure 600-by-50-metres and 240-by-10-metres respectively and assessments of neighbouring lands had identified them as having low likelihood of archaeological significance.Coastal GasLink president David Pfeiffer says he regrets the errors that led to the construction.last_img read more

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first_imgChicago: Rapper R. Kelly has been released from jail here after the $161,000 he owed in child support was paid. The Cook County sheriff’s office said the money was paid on Saturday morning and he was set free shortly afterwards, reports bbc.com. It is unclear who made the singer’s payment. The R&B artist was last month charged with 10 counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse, involving four alleged victims, three of whom were minors. Also Read – Hilarie Burton, Jeffery Dean Morgan tie the knot He pleaded not guilty to all the charges and was released on bail after spending three nights in jail. If convicted, he faces three to seven years in prison on each charge. As he walked out of jail on Saturday, CNN quoted him as saying: “We’re going to straighten all this stuff out.” The singer had been prepared to pay up to $60,000 of what he owed to his former wife, Andrea Kelly, and their three children, but the judge had required the full amount and ordered him detained. The singer’s defence attorney had previously said the singer was having financial difficulties and his finances were a “mess”. Kelly has been a target of a boycott campaign, and his recording contract has been cancelled.last_img read more

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