first_imgA multiple choice exam. (Creative Commons photo by Alberto G. )The Juneau School District is one of the first in Alaska to make the AP District Honor Roll, a prestigious recognition for districts that increased the percentage of students who took and passed Advanced Placement tests.Listen NowJuneau School District Superintendent Mark Miller explained how the tests work.“(A) student takes a college level course that we give at high school and at the end they take a test,” Miller said. “If they score a three, four (or) five, typically colleges will give them credit.”Five is the highest score.The College Board, the organization that offers AP tests, has an honor roll for districts. To make the list, a district has to meet three criteria over three consecutive years.“One, increase the number of AP tests given – meaning more students are taking more tests,” Miller said. “Second, while you increase the number of students taking tests, you also increase the scores … average scores of students taking the tests.”Juneau School District’s percentage of students who took the exam had to go up by at least 11 percent to qualify. Larger districts have to increase participation by 4 to 6 percent.For its third requirement, the district had to increase or maintain its percentage of minority students who scored at least a three on at least one exam.Miller believes having two separate high schools has made it easier to schedule students into AP courses. He also thinks the achievement is a result of training more teachers to teach AP classes and the administration’s work to make the tests available to as many students as possible.“It’s really about pushing for equity, pushing to make sure all of our students succeed, pushing students to do their best regardless of their background or where they come from,” Miller said.Miller said the AP courses and tests prepare students for college-level classes, and if they score well, they could save thousands of dollars in college tuition.The honor roll dates back to 2011. According to the College Board, Juneau School District is the second Alaskan school district to make the list. The Anchorage School District made last year’s honor roll.last_img read more

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first_imgFacebook software developer Tom Occhino talked more about React Native in a blog post, explaining that developers still have to write two sets of code—Web and mobile—for React.js and React Native. But developers will now be able to apply the same principles to iOS and soon Android development.“React forces us to break our applications down into discrete components, each representing a single view,” Occhino wrote. “These components make it easier to iterate on our products, since we don’t need to keep the entire system in our head in order to make changes to one part of it. More important, though, React wraps the DOM’s mutative, imperative API with a declarative one, which raises the level of abstraction and simplifies the programming model.”React Native combines aspects of the React.js Web framework with the Rebound Java library for dynamic spring animations and the Flux application architecture within the open-source iOS framework. React Native offers application features and capabilities such as integrating native iOS components, asynchronous execution, touch handling, polyfills and extensibility.More details are available on the React Native website. Facebook captured the hearts of the open-source community this week by announcing the release of the iOS version of React Native on GitHub during its F8 developer conference.React, a JavaScript framework for native development environments, allows developers to build mobile UIs without browser or WebView involvement. React Native for Android will be coming soon, according to the F8 keynote from Mike Schroepfer, Facebook’s CTO. React Native is focused on cross-platform developer efficiency, and has been used in-house by Facebook to build multiple applications.Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer announces Reactive Native during F8 keynotelast_img read more

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first_imgCall it the digital sword of Damocles: Like some torturous situation out of an Edgar Allan Poe story, the entire world’s population of Android users is currently waiting with baited breath for Joshua Drake (Jduck) to release his claimed super exploit for Android. The famous security researcher claims his exploit can take advantage of 95% of all Android devices.The actual exploit has yet to arrive, as it will be released formally at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas this coming week. It’s such a big deal that Jduck and Zimperium Labs (his security company) are hosting an exploit release party at the event. I’ve been in the security industry for almost 20 years now, and I have never heard of an exploit release party.The core of the supposed exploit comes from libstagefright: a library in Android that handles the rendering of moving images. The result of this library having exploitable code inside of it is that Jduck has crafted an SMS message with a picture attached. Send that picture to someone, and even if they don’t look at the image, their phone is compromised with arbitrary code execution. That’s a major downer for the Android community, and hopefully it won’t last long: an update to the included library could patch the arbitrary code execution exploit. But then, if we were all using the same phone, we could easily patch, right? Instead, we’re all using 10,000 different devices, and they’ll all require their own patch from the manufacturer.In the somewhat less doom and gloom news category, Android Developer Conference will also be hosting some quality talks on the Android ecosystem. Keynote speaker Aparna Chennapragada, product director at Google, will be discussing the future of search and apps on Android, tomorrow.Additional keynotes will be given from Qualcomm and Intel. Qualcomm will be discussing the benefits of using its Android development boards for protyping, while Intel will be discussing the advantages of Android on Intel.Android Developer Conference kicks off today and runs through Friday.last_img read more

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first_imgDevelopers and hackers that want to make their side projects profitable or well-known now have a new platform to try: Indie Hackers. It allows individuals to learn how other developers are “writing their own paychecks.”Indie Hackers is a platform that is focused on community and openness, and was recently launched and created by recent MIT graduate and full-stack developer Courtland Allen. According to Allen, thousands of hackers run their own side-businesses, but no one ever hears about them because they are not mainstream or covered by large publications.“Many hackers are eager to make money, but there are few examples to draw from,” Allen wrote. Indie Hackers provides a place where founders can share their projects and inspire other hackers to create their own ideas.Projects on Indie Hackers are listed by revenue, funding, founders and categories. Some of the projects that are live on Indie Hackers includes a daily planning app named Complice, a scalable sentiment analysis API named Semantria, and a food delivery software company named Trackin, to name a few. Developers interested in submitting their own business can send in this form. New Amazon Web Services Application Load BalancerAmazon Web Services launched a new Application Load Balancer option for Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), which has become a key component for several AWS applications. The Application Load Balancer option runs at Layer 7, which makes it more powerful and allows for more support of advanced features. The original option is still available to developers, and it continues to offer both Layer 4 and Layer 7 functionality. Available features in the Application Load Balancer includes support for content-based routing, and support for applications that run in containers. The Application Load Balancer also supports industry standard protocols like WebSocket and HTTP/2, according to an AWS blog. Developers can get started creating a new Application Load Balancer of their own, and use it to benefit their websites and mobile apps that run in containers. CoreOS delivers Tectonic v1.3CoreOS’s release of Tectonic version 1.3 aims to allow enterprises to run containers with Kubernetes securely and reliably — anywhere. New enterprise features in Kubernetes are available today in Tectonic v1.3, and it includes an authorization framework that allows for managing rights on a cluster. There is also enterprise authentication in this version of Tectonic, giving enterprises better LDAP support so they can leverage their existing authentication infrastructure. Tectonic v1.3 includes the updated Tectonic Console, which gives teams a high level graphical view of the state of a cluster. It provides a visualization of Distributed Trusted Computing node status, and the ability for DevOps teams to scale cluster application deployments as well. BDR 1.0 release notes 2ndQuadrant, a group of PostgreSQL support and development analysts, released Postgres-BDR 1.0, based on PostgreSQL 9.4.9 today. This release contains improvements to DDL replication locking, global sequences, documentation, and performance. It also removes the deprecated UDR component in favor of pglogical, according to a blog. The release sets a foundation to port BDR to PostgreSQL 9.6, and it enhances its high-availability capabilities, according to the team. The most important changes include improvements to DDL locking to reduce operational impact, a fix for dropped column handling when cloning new nodes via bdr_node_join, and the removal of UDR. Postgres-BDR is an asynchronous multi-master replication system for PostgreSQL, and it specifically allows geographically distributed clusters. A full list of changes to this stable release is available here.last_img read more

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