first_imgThis piece was produced by KALW and is republished here with permission as part of a collaboration with KALW.  Click the audio player above to hear the story.For more information on organizations that can assist with more housing and displacement help, see links below:Causa JustaSan Francisco Tenants UnionLegal Assistance for the Elderly DENISE ALVARADO: I wake up sometimes, really positive and then I remember that I’m losing my home, and my neighborhood, and this city I love, and that I have nowhere to go; my heart will start to pound. San Francisco tenant law provides some protections for vulnerable populations being evicted, but although Denise Alvarado is a senior and on disability, she doesn’t qualify. So, the San Francisco native is trying to figure out where she’ll go next. 0% Two months ago, 63-year-old Outer Mission Resident Denise Alvarado received an eviction notice. The reason: her building was sold and the new owners say they want to move in.It’s called Owner-Move-In Occupancy, and it’s one of the more common types of evictions for rent-controlled units in the city. According to the San Francisco Rent Board, they are on the rise, up 26 percent in the past two years. Tags: displacement • housing Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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first_img 0% Arrests in the Mission were up 15 percent from last year. So far this year, in the Mission District, police have arrested 2,795 people.Individuals between 18 to 29 years old comprised 40 percent of all arrests in the Mission, while people between 30 to 39 made up 28 percent of the arrests. Calls to report violent crime prompted 22.3 percent of the use of force incidents in the Mission, while calls to report property crime accounted for 18.7 percent. “Mental health-related” and persons with a knife each comprised 10.1 percent of the incidents. Search and arrest warrant calls led to 9.4 percent of the times officers used force, “person with a gun” led to 7.2 percent, and suspicious persons lead to 6.4 percent. Other calls for service — traffic-related, terrorist threats, restraining order violations, field interviews, disturbance calls and weapon carrying — accounted for less than five percent apiece. Despite a citywide reduction in police using force in the third quarter of this year, the Mission District accounted for the highest number of times officers used force — and has actually seen an uptick, according to use-of-force data released by the SFPD. In the third quarter of 2017, the police reported 622 uses of force citywide, down 32.1 percent from 916 in the same period of 2016. However, the Mission police district — which encompasses most of the Mission and the Castro — saw a 13-percent increase in the number of times officers used force, from 123 in the third quarter of 2016 to 139 during the same period this year. The Mission District accounted for 22.35 percent of the times in which police used force in the city.  In a recent interview with Mission Local, San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott attributed the reduction in citywide use of force to more crisis-intervention-trained officers — which he said was now at 800, about a third of the department. He also said that it might also be attributed in part to the department’s use of body-worn cameras, which the department adopted in June 2016. He also pointed to the department’s revised use-of-force policy, which now emphasizes “de-escalation” and time-and-distance in lieu of quicker, at times more violent, methods of quelling a situation. “Now you have a generation of police officers that are being trained, and de-escalation is on the forefront of their thoughts,” he said. He prefaced his remarks on the fact that the SFPD is seeking an academic analysis of the data so the department can “make some sense of all this.” He said the department is working on an Memorandum of Understanding with an outside organization, which he said he couldn’t disclose. “The biggest challenge for us is keeping that train going in the right direction,” he added. “At the end of the day, what we want to do is use the least amount of force to resolve the situation — and, hopefully, no force.” Scott was unclear why officers’ use of force in the Mission District was so high.“Mission is a very busy district, and geographically it’s a very large district,” he said, although he did not want to discuss the reasons further without proper academic analysis.  The Mission is indeed one of the busiest stations; in 2016, it had more than 90,000 calls for service, by far the most of any police district.Map of “uses of force” by police district for the third quarter of 2017. Image courtesy of the SFPD.In the first three quarters of 2017, the Mission logged 467 separate times force was used by individual officers, and 196 use-of-force incidents. Officers used force on a total of 251 people in the Mission. “Use of force” can include a variety of actions, including pointing a firearm at an individual or using an impact weapon, such as a baton. A use-of-force “incident” is any time an officer or group of officers responds to a crime and uses force. Multiple uses of force can be take place during a use-of-force incident. Although the incident may involve one crime, each officer involved can commit a separate use of force, and can use force more than once, which helps to explain the differences between the people, the number of incidents, and the number of times force is used per incident. In the Mission, most uses of force involved “pointing of firearms” at 84 — the most of any district. The second highest was “physical control” at 39, “strike by object/fist” at 11, less-lethal firearm at 3, and “impact weapon” at 2. These uses of force occurred during 64 total use-of-force incidents. In the third quarter alone, the number of people on whom police used force was up 19.4 percent in the Mission to 74 in the third quarter of this year, compared to the same period last year.  The 74 — the highest of any police district — accounted for 20.9 percent of the citywide total. That total was down by 16.3 percent to 354 people, compared to 423 during the same period last year.  Citywide, force was used disproportionately on black men, as they accounted for 43.7 percent of the of the times force was used, but make up less than 6 percent of the city’s population. White men accounted for 22.5 percent of the times force was used and are more than 53.5 percent of the population, while Hispanic men accounted for 16.2 percent of the incidents and make up 15.2 percent of the population.  The quarterly use of force report did not offer a district-by-district breakdown of the gender and ethnicity of the subjects on whom police used force, but did detail arrests by district and the kinds of people who were arrested. Hispanic and black men accounted for more than half of all arrests in the Mission during the reporting period. In the third quarter of 2017, police arrested 955 individuals in the Mission, the most of any district at 17.28 percent of all arrests.  Hispanic men made up 28.4 percent of the arrests in the Mission, white men, 24.3 percent and black men, 24.1 percent. Tags: Mission Police Station • police • SFPD Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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first_img Tags: housing Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% DaleDuncan is trying to be a nice guy. He’s trying real, real hard. But, sometimes, it’s just too much. Anne Kihagi is just too much. And not just sometimes. “I’m not a big schadenfreude guy,” says the former Kihagi tenant who, last year, won a $3.5 million ruling against his erstwhile landlord after a fraudulent eviction from his family’s longtime Mission District flat — purportedly the largest such judgment in state history. “But,” he continues after a thoughtful pause, “It’s hard not to feel some schadenfreude right now.” Anne Kihagi’s tenants are now writing their rent checks directly to the city — to the tune of perhaps $120,000 a month That’s because the city, which has already secured a $5.5 million judgment against Kihagi regarding her mountain of tenant harassment and unpermitted construction violations, this month has commenced collecting on that debt. It is doing so by collecting Kihagi’s rents. “I just got the letter from the City Attorney,” affirms Sheila Hembury, a decades-long resident at 1135-1139 Guerrero, whom Kihagi has attempted — and failed — to evict on multiple occasions. “It said that now we should send our rent checks to the City and County of San Francisco.” She has: Deputy City Attorney Peter Keith confirms that, even by late January, the rent checks were trickling in. Now those funds — which he estimates as upwards of $100,000 a month and perhaps more than $123,000 a month — will no longer go toward Kihagi hiring a small army of attorneys to fight every last legal move from the city or funding various illegal construction projects. They’ll go toward paying off her heaping fine. Or, more accurately, they’ll begin to pay off the interest on that fine, which has been accruing at 10 percent yearly since mid-2017. That’s more than half a million dollars a year. That’s about $1,500 a day. “I don’t trust her as far as I could throw a piano,” notes Hembury. “I am sure she has something else up her sleeve.” That’s understandable. For years, Kihagi and her family members, employing a tangled web of LLCs, bought up building after building in this city and, particularly, the Mission. Harassment of tenants, especially long-standing rent-controlled tenants, many of whom are elderly and disabled, followed thereafter, as did evictions and new, market-rate rentals. “The paper value of the building skyrockets, so there’s more to borrow against to make the next down payments on the next buildings,” Keith told me last year. It’s a lucrative business model — in the short-term. More to the point, it sounds an awful lot like a Ponzi scheme. With the city now elbowing in and taking the rental income from the seven buildings covered by its litigation — five of which are in the Mission — Kihagi may have reached the capacity on tricks one can store in one’s sleeve. No Ponzi scheme lasts forever. The question always is: who’ll be left holding the bag? It looks like it may well be Kihagi.Local reporting isn’t free. Join Mission Local today and support feet-on-the ground reporting.Anne Kihagihas turned out to be the Sandy Koufax of bad San Francisco landlords. There are many who worked at it longer. There are many who owned more properties and ruined more tenants’ lives. But Kihagi put together an explosive, electric run, defined by manic energy and overall brevity; it was barely five years ago when she bought her first San Francisco property, followed in short order by at least 10 more — a $30 million whirlwind of acquisitions. These days, billionaire venture capitalist Ron Conway is being portrayed as the living embodiment of all the destruction tech and money have wrought on San Francisco. In much the same way, one could install Kihagi as the poster child for the rapaciousness that has expelled long-standing tenants from this city (and, particularly, the Mission, her base of operations). But say what you will about Ron Conway, he’s no Anne Kihagi.The cartoonish excess of her behavior at times feels too on-the-nose for even a parody. But this is no parody. It wasn’t enough for Kihagi to attempt to hound elderly people out of her buildings or cut off their electric or water or leave the front door busted so vagrants could amble in and befoul the foyer. It wasn’t enough to point “security” cameras at residents’ doors and windows reducing life in a Kihagi building to time served in the panopticon; it wasn’t enough to wander, uninvited, into tenants’ dwellings; it wasn’t enough to disable the mailbox so that elderly renters had to travel miles to the post office on the off-chance they were given a three-day eviction notice. Kihagi did all that, but she also had to be theatrical. She accused the city of West Hollywood of discriminating against her because she is a heterosexual. She made protection-racket-like threats regarding a tenant’s pet and how “it would be a shame” if anything happened to it. She posted a notice — in writing, mind you — on the door of Guerrero Street tenant Sylvia Smith accusing the septuagenarian of operating a “900-SEX-TALK”  line out of her house (a judge later noted that there was “not a scintilla” of evidence of this, but it did leave Smith mortified, with neighbors shouting, “Sylvia! Give me your number!”). That theatricality spilled into the courtroom, with onlookers describing Kihagi as blatantly micromanaging her attorneys. She sued three of them after failing to evict Hambury and her husband, Leonard Johnson, pinning the outcome on their “professional negligence” — and not her own unnerving behavior and testimony (or the facts of the case).  This continued in 2018, when Kihagi made a somewhat surreal Jan. 18 appearance in bankruptcy court. To stave off the city’s plan to collect her rents starting on Jan. 1, she had declared four of her LLCs to be bankrupt simultaneously. She failed, however, to hire an attorney — or complete the necessary paperwork disclosing her holdings. Judge Hannah Blumenstiel was not amused. “This is federal court, not a parking garage,” the judge lectured Kihagi. “When you seek relief in bankruptcy court, you get significant protections. The price for that protection is transparency.” Blumenstiel dismissed Kihagi’s case in a mere 20-minute hearing. The city then moved to collect her February rent and has employed a debt-collection attorney to pry away January’s. A mere five days later, Kihagi skipped a court appearance for, her attorney claimed, medical reasons. And yet, Keith alleges, there she was “looking fit as a fiddle” when he walked out of the courtroom. Her attorney spirited her away and Keith hasn’t seen her since.   Kihagi’s creditors are smelling blood. Umpqua Bank wants its pound of flesh, and litigation with the city over the diverted Kihagi rents seems imminent. Kihagi claims she’s paid her mortgages, but the bank — which ought to know such things — claims she has not. Meanwhile, Duncan and his family are owed $3.5 million, and other wronged tenants also have their pending days in court (Kihagi is also due back in court: The city, on Feb. 1, filed contempt charges, claiming she not only failed to fork over January’s rents but is actively instructing her tenants to not pay the city).“There is a special place in the abusive landlord hall of shame reserved for Anne Kihagi,” says City Attorney Dennis Herrera. “She has tried every trick in the book to subvert tenant protections and the rule of law. Predatory landlords should take note: She is not getting away with it, and they won’t, either.”It required a tremendous amount of time and effort and legal costs, but Anne Kihagi’s reign of terror has been checked. But remunerations have not yet materialized; Duncan, for one, hasn’t seen one cent. And plenty of landlords slightly less cavalier and demonstrative — and theatrical — slip beneath the city’s radar altogether. “I just keep saying that we have to trust the process,” affirms Duncan. “Three years ago, Kihagi was driving around town with that big smile, buying up buildings and sending out eviction notices. Now she’s driving around town from trial to trial and losing. That’s the process.” Still, it’d be nice if the process paid him some money for his troubles. “We have justice, and that does feel good. But if we could get not even 10 cents on the dollar, man, that’s a down payment.” 0%last_img read more

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first_imgTHE U20s end of season revival continued against yet more opposition higher placed in the table with this fine 34-10 victory over a typically competitive FC side, writes Graham Henthorne.Bolstered by the returning Gary Wheeler the Reserves looked to be in control from the off and could have scored on their first two sets. Josh Jones’ weaving run in and out down the right ended with him being stopped short of the line and some sparkling interplay down the left between Wheeler, Matty Ashurst and Scott Hale deserved more.The Saints finally opened their account as Dan Brotherton scored the first of his three for the afternoon. Jones again did the damage down the right but Ben Karalius’ cross kick on the last was fumbled by the defence giving Brotherton the easiest of scores.The lead could and should have been doubled from the kick off but the overlap was squandered.Crucially the Saints ball control started to slip and with it the visitors grew in confidence taking the lead with two well taken tries.From the kick off the restart was allowed to bounce into touch and the Saints made the visitors pay. Karalius’s grubber on the last was knocked back by Wheeler as it threatened to run dead and was pounced on by Ashurst for the go ahead score.Despite opening the second half with no completions in the first seven sets the Reserves still managed to bomb two good opportunities as first Scott Hale’s break came to nothing and then Tommy Johnson knocked on over the line.But as the Saints held onto the ball so the tries came.Dan Brotherton won the battle of the speedsters as Reece Lyne missed the high bomb it was gathered by Brotherton who beat two then stretched his legs to go 95 metres for the scoreA quick tap on the FC line gave Ant Walker a stroll in and the game was well and truly up when Alex Trumper finished a great handling move involving Ashurst, Nathan Ashe, Karalius and Aaron Lloyd.The last word was Brotherton’s hat-trick score in the corner after a good drive on his debut from 6 foot 7 inch Irishman Aaron McCluskey who got better and more menacing to the opposition as the game went on.For a moment in the second half the Reserves of earlier in the year would have buckled under their own pressure but this time, as last week, they battled through the bad times and came good. The hard defensive work put in by Assistant Coaches Glyn Walsh and Mick Oxley with all the players has shown itself in the past couple of weeks making the Saints a harder side to beat.Walker, Carl Forster and the robot that is Jordan Hand laid the platform for Ashurst and Wheeler to weave their magic.Oh, if only those injuries hadn’t wiped out most of the season!!Match Summary:Saints: Tries: Dan Brotherton 3, Anthony Walker, Matty Ashurst, Alex Trumper.Goals: Tommy Johnson 5.Hull FC:Tries: Tom Lineham, Chris Green.Goals: James Newton.Half Time: 12-10Full Time: 34-10Teams:Saints:1. Tommy Johnson; 2. Simon Atherton, 3. Josh Jones, 4. Gary Wheeler, 5. Dan Brotherton; 6. Nathan Ashe, 7. Ben Karalius; 8. Carl Forster, 9. Aaron Lloyd, 10. Anthony Walker, 11. Scott Hale, 12. Joe Greenwood, 13. Matty Ashurst. Subs: 14. Marcus Baines, 15. Alex Trumper, 16. Aaron McCluskey, 17. Jordan Hand.Hull FC:1. Danny Swales; 2. Tom Lineham, 3. Nev Morrison, 4. Shane Simpson, 5. Reece Lyne; 6. Luke Briscoe, 7. Lee Williams; 8. Josh Bowden, 9. James Newton, 10. Jack Aldous, 14. Laurence Pearce, 12. Alec Norris, 13. Chris Green. Subs: 11. Reece Lazenby, 15. Austin Bell, 16. Crawford Matthews, 17. Chad McGlane.last_img read more

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first_imgIT was all go at Langtree Park today (Saturday) as not only did the Saints Superstore host Josh Perry, Willie Manu and Jordan Turner but fans turned up to help clear the pitch of snow ahead of Sunday’s match against Wakefield.At present Jon Wilkin’s Testimonial match is going ahead as planned but we will let you know as soon as possible if that changes.last_img

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first_imgSAINTS have announced their squad for Friday’s Super League XVIII Round 12 match against Catalan Dragons.Carl Forster is drafted into the line-up in the only change from last week’s 19 – replacing the injured Mark Flanagan.Nathan Brown will choose from:1. Paul Wellens, 3. Jordan Turner, 4. Sia Soliola, 5. Francis Meli, 6. Lance Hohaia, 10. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 12. Jon Wilkin, 14. Anthony Laffranchi, 16. Paul Clough, 19. Josh Jones, 21. Tom Makinson, 22. Carl Forster, 23. Nathan Ashe, 24. Joe Greenwood (pictured), 25. Alex Walmsley, 26. Adam Swift, 30. Mark Percival, 32. James Tilley, 36. Stuart Howarth.Laurent Frayssinous will choose his Catalan side from:2. Damien Blanch, 3. Leon Pryce, 4. Zeb Taia, 6. Thomas Bosc, 9. Ian Henderson, 10. Rēmi Casty, 11. Steve Menzies, 12. Louis Anderson, 13. Gregory Mounis, 14. William Barthau, 16. Eloi Pelissier, 17. Kevin Larroyer, 18. Daryl Millard, 20. Mickael Simon, 22. Jamel Fakir, 23. Lopini Paea, 24. Jason Baitieri, 26. Frederic Vaccari, 28. Morgan Escarē.The game kicks off at 8pm and the referee is Phil Bentham.Ticket details are here.Stat Pack:Last 10 Meetings:Catalan Dragons 15, St Helens 20 (SLR21, 20/7/12)St Helens 32, Catalan Dragons 34 (SLR4, 24/2/12)St Helens 40, Catalan Dragons 18 (SLR22, 15/7/11)Catalan Dragons 16, St Helens 22 (SLR4, 5/3/11)St Helens 20, Catalan Dragons 30 (SLR21, 9/7/10)Catalan Dragons 12, St Helens 42 (SLR3, 20/2/10)St Helens 12, Catalan Dragons 24 (SLR27, 11/9/09)Catalan Dragons 28, St Helens 32 (SLR13, 16/5/09)St Helens 42, Catalan Dragons 8 (CCR5, 10/5/09)St Helens 28, Catalan Dragons 10 (SLR14, 17/5/08)Super League Summary:St Helens won 9Catalan Dragons won 6Highs and Lows:St Helens highest score: 53-10 (H, 2007) (also widest margin)Catalan Dragons highest score: 34-32 (A, 2012) (Widest margin: 21-0, H, 2007)last_img read more

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first_imgSAINTS will have two players in Saturday night’s England v Wales youth test match.We’d like to wish Aaron Smith (England) pictured above and Morgan Knowles (Wales) pictured below the very best of luck in the game in Cardiff.Both will tour Australia with the Saints in October and have recently signed part time professional contracts to graduate from the Scholarship to the Academy.Lewis Fairhurst misses out on the Test because of a broken hand.last_img

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first_img Trooper A. J. Knoerzer said Oscar Rameriz, 23, of Wilmington, was driving a 2007 Pontiac Solstice. His girlfriend, Amy Yepez, 24, also of Wilmington, was a passenger in the car.The highway patrol says Rameriz ran off the road and into a ditch before striking a tree.He died at the scene. Yepez suffered non life-threatening injuries and was transported to New Hanover Regional Medical Center.Related Article: Currie man charged in fatal DWI crashYepez told the trooper she fell asleep prior to the crash but she was unsure if Rameriz dozed off before the car ran off the highway.The highway patrol said wet road conditions may have contributed to the accident. Speed did not appear to be a factor in the crash, Knoerzer said. BURGAW, NC (WWAY) — Driver fatigue may have caused a fatal accident in Pender County early Monday morning.According to the North Carolina Highway Patrol, the single-vehicle crash occurred around 5:30 a.m. in the eastbound lanes of I-40 slightly east of the Highway 53 exit for Burgaw.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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first_img Proctor said the towns of Holly Ridge, North Topsail Beach, Surf City, and Topsail Beach bought buckets and covered them in stickers. She said anyone willing can come by town hall and take a bucket to the beach and fill it with trash. When you bring it back to town hall, Proctor said you will be able to choose from six different companies giving away a gift or a coupon.“Each town has a different personality, but they all have common ground in the condition of the beaches and waterways,” Proctor said.Proctor said the companies offering gifts and coupons are The Daily Grind, Ecological Marine Adventures, Carolina Décor and More, Gallagher’s Bar and Grill, Shuckin’ Shack, and Whisky Tactical.Related Article: Police: Man back in custody after escaping from Pender Co. jailProctor said there is no end date set. She said they hope for this to be an on-going project. (Photo: Christina Burke/Town of Topsail Beach) PENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Four towns in Pender County are offering incentives to get the community to pick up trash on area beaches.Pender County Tourism Director Tammy Proctor said the beach clean-up initiative started right after Labor Day on Tuesday.(Photo: Christina Burke/Town of Topsail Beach)- Advertisement – last_img read more

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first_img Board of Elections Director Sara Knotts says they did an audit over the weekend of the 2,172 ballots cast at the LCAC when it was brought to their attention. That’s when they determined 147 voters were given incorrect ballots.Knotts said they very swiftly put procedures in place at all locations to have lead workers review the process of pulling up the voter ballot and making sure it is right.The Brunswick County Board of Election is working with the State Board of Elections. They will send out a letter, they hope by tomorrow, notifying the affected voters of the error. Those voters will then be told to come back and vote again.Related Article: Pelosi elected speaker, will lead Dems confronting TrumpKnotts stressed that voters will not get two votes. The first ballot is going to be tossed out and the correct one put in its place.Knotts said the only difference between the two ballots is the House District seat.For voters who decide to vote new ballots, the original ballot will be discarded, and only the new, correct ballot will be counted. For voters who decide not to vote new ballots, their votes will be counted for all races, except for the state House race in question.Some Brunswick County residents vote for House District 17 and others vote for House District 18.If the affected voters provided a phone number when they registered, Board of Elections staff also will call the phone number on record this week. Citizens who voted at the Leland Cultural Arts Center during those dates can email their name, address and phone number to sara.knotts@brunswickcountync.gov to find out if they are among the affected voters. Voters cast ballots at Leland Cultural Arts Center on October 17, 2018 (Photo: Randy Aldridge/WWAY) LELAND, NC (WWAY) — Nearly 150 voters will have to recast their ballots due to ‘human error’ at a polling location in Leland.The Brunswick County Board of Elections confirms one, possibly two, poll workers at the Leland Cultural Arts Center did not pull up the ballots correctly and gave some voters the incorrect ballot.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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