first_imgSaint Mary’s will begin screening testing Sept. 22, the College announced an update posted to the Live.Learn.Work. website.“Screening testing allows an organization to discover positive cases, in particular among asymptomatic individuals,” the website said.The current plan will test 60 students a week, approximately 5% of the student population, through early November. According to the website, all undergraduate and graduate students who attend in-person classes are eligible for testing, and faculty and staff will not be tested at this time.Students that will be removed from the random selection pool include “anyone who tested positive within 12 weeks of the current week, students who are currently in quarantine/isolation and students who withdraw effective immediately, during the semester.”The testing will take place every Tuesday and Thursday from 4-5:30 p.m. in the Health and Counseling Center. Students will be informed of their selection on Friday by email and text message. They will then be required to make an appointment via SignUpGenius. Students who do not attend their appointments will be subject to a disciplinary process.These rapid antigen tests will be free of charge to students.Tags: Health and Counseling Center, random testing, saint marys covid response, screening testinglast_img read more

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first_imgWNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.MAYVILLE — The number of active COVID-19 cases in Chautauqua County dropped from 23 to 19 on Thursday.That’s according to Chautauqua County Health Officials, who also reported two new cases of a young adult and a male in his 20s.Officials say 325 cases are under quarantine/isolation orders by the Public Health Director and are being monitored. Not all of those being monitored are confirmed to have COVID-19 but have either shown symptoms, are awaiting results, or have risk factors.A total of 779 people are under domestic traveler quarantine for having arrived to Chautauqua County from a state listed on the New York State travel advisory. One person is hospitalized in Chautauqua County as of Tuesday. To date:190 recovered cases;8 deaths;217 total confirmed cases; and20,798 negative test results. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_img A former Pussycat Doll wants you to shake your maracas! Olivier nominee Nicole Scherzinger will head to the small screen for ABC’s remake of Dirty Dancing, according to The Hollywood Reporter. She’ll take on the role of Penny Johnson, Johnny’s initial dance partner. The role was played in the 1987 film by Cynthia Rhodes. The West End alum joins a cast that includes the previously announced Abigail Breslin as Baby, Broadway dancer Colt Prattes as Johnny and Debra Messing as Marjorie.Scherzinger recently starred as Grizabella in the London revival of Cats and is rumored to reprise her Olivier-nominated performance on Broadway later this year. Her additional credits include Maureen in Rent at the Hollywood Bowl, as well as a winning turn on Dancing with the Stars, How I Met Your Mother, Men in Black 3 Half & Half and My Wife and Kids.The TV event (not a live telecast) will be directed by Wayne Blair and choreographed by Hamilton’s Andy Blankenbuehler. Shooting is set for this spring. Additional casting will be announced later. View Comments Nicole Scherzinger(Photo: Bruce Glikas)last_img read more

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first_imgOver the 25 years that the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has offered its Certificate in International Agriculture, more than 125 certificate students have traveled to dozens of countries throughout the world to conduct internships with UGA partners.While all certificate students have similar international interests and experiences, they tend to complete their certificate programs individually. They have not had the benefit of a community where they can get together and share those experiences until now.The Office of Global Programs hosted the first International Agriculture Certificate Student Night on Sept. 1 in an effort to the give certificate students the chance to network and get to know one another.The event provided an opportunity for students in the program to share a meal, travel stories, advice and encouragement.“We are excited to bring this group together to help build a community of exceptional and internationally minded students within CAES,” said Vicki McMaken, associate director of the CAES Office of Global Programs. “These students are working hard to internationalize their degree programs at UGA and can provide support and inspiration to one another. Our certificate students end up in some really exciting careers after graduation, and we hope that better connecting them while they are at UGA may encourage networking among certificate alumni in the years to come.”Students got to swap stories during dinner, and then the college showcased the work of standout international students.Rachel Wigington, who is pursuing her master’s degree in agricultural and environmental education, presented about her summer internship in France working on a community garden project, and agribusiness student Chris Reynolds shared about his horticulture-focused internship in Morocco.Students spent the remainder of the evening in small groups brainstorming ideas for potential group service projects and plans for future networking events.CAES works continuously to make sure students have the opportunity to engage in experiential learning activities during their academic career.These enrichment opportunities are designed to give students real-world experience that broadens their horizons and makes them more marketable to employers when they graduate. By the 2016 fall semester, every college within UGA will be required to provide experiential learning opportunities to their students. Until then, students can find these opportunities readily available to them now in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The Certificate in International Agriculture offers students a unique opportunity to internationalize their degree program while learning about international agricultural issues and to gain firsthand experience living and working abroad. Consisting of foreign language study, internationally relevant coursework, and an international internship, the certificate’s curriculum requirements are flexible and can be arranged to fit each student’s particular interests.Students participating in the certificate program concentrate on a specific country or region of the world. They gain knowledge of a relevant language as well as an understanding of the environmental, social, political and cultural issues in that part of the world.For more information about study abroad programs offered through the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences or the Certificate in International Agriculture, visit http://www.global.uga.edu.last_img read more

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York U.S. Marshals and Suffolk County police are asking for the public’s help in finding a 20-year-old man wanted for allegedly raping an 11-year-old girl in Manorville two years ago.Carlos Zhunio has a warrant out for his arrest on charges of first-degree rape, second-degree rape and endangering the welfare of a child.Special Victims detectives said he forcibly raped the victim at a residence in Manorville on June 16, 2013. Zhunio, who lived in Manorville at the time, may still be staying in the area or in Brooklyn.Anyone with information about this crime is asked to call anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. All calls will be kept confidential.Suffolk County Crime Stoppers is offering a cash reward of up to $5,000 for information that leads to an arrest.last_img read more

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first_imgSep 21, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – State Public Health Veterinarian Mira Leslie, DVM, MPH, hopes to greatly expand Washington’s disease surveillance network Oct 1 when she speaks at a statewide veterinary meeting.She will explain how a $75,000 grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lets veterinarians test domestic animals for plague and tularemia at a university diagnostic lab. It’s one prong of a statewide biosurveillance project that will include screening of wild mammals as well as pets.The grant has several goals: gathering baseline data for understanding zoonotic diseases that could be used as biological weapons, identifying emerging infections, improving communication between vets and public health workers, and paying for diagnostic testing, Leslie told CIDRAP News.Leslie expects to receive samples from healthy and sick outdoor pets from vets in each of 10 regions in the state, allowing health officials to map the distribution of exposure to endemic diseases such as plague and tularemia. In addition to providing routine samples, veterinarians as well as wildlife biologists and other experts can submit the bodies of domestic pets and wild animals with suspicious signs for full necropsy.The Washington project is one example of a growing national and international movement to link the monitoring of human and animal diseases.”That discussion about national animal disease surveillance is just beginning,” Leslie said. “Some (US states) had programs before bioterrorism and some are implementing things now with bioterrorism funds.”The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) has encouraged countries to develop and maintain wildlife disease surveillance programs in conjunction with farm animal disease programs, said Thomas DeLiberto, DVM, PhD, with the US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Wildlife Services branch in Colorado. And a World Health Organization (WHO) regional director said on Sep 14 that WHO must pay closer attention to animal health because zoonotic diseases will keep emerging.It’s important to assess animal populations, said Tracee Treadwell, DVM, MPH, chief of the epidemiology, surveillance, and response branch of the bioterrorism response program in the National Center for Infectious Diseases at CDC in Atlanta.More than half of the diseases considered most likely to be used as bioweapons are zoonotic, and they may be seen in the animal population first, she added.Surveillance efforts are improving, she said. For example, the CDC’s Public Health Information Network includes detection and monitoring for bioterror threats. She is pushing for equity for the growing number of veterinary diagnostic labs joining the Laboratory Response Network, which CDC describes as state and local public health, federal, military, and international labs that can respond to biological and chemical terrorism.”It’s very, very important that public health take on a broader definition and be inclusive not only of humans but of animals,” Treadwell said. “Ultimately, it affects everyone.”While the trend is broad, efforts vary. The CDC is funding a program at Purdue University’s School of Veterinary Medicine in West Lafayette, Ind., that uses an electronic database of animal health information assembled by veterinarians at clinics in PETsMART stores nationwide. Because the database covers many states, it could help identify patterns in the event of an outbreak such as monkeypox, Treadwell said.Another example is plague monitoring, which has been part of the mission at APHIS since its creation in the late 1800s, DeLiberto said.Concern about bioterrorism, animal outbreaks, and zoonotic diseases has escalated in recent years, he added. Sep 11, 2001, spurred the unease, as have outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease, chronic wasting disease, mad cow disease, and exotic Newcastle disease.In roughly the past year, APHIS has hired 23 wildlife biologists specializing in diseases to assist in surveillance efforts. In addition to developing a national plan for plague and tularemia, DiLiberto said, his agency is tracking feral swine, a potential host for many diseases.”If we had an outbreak of avian influenza jumping into pigs, we’d already have this surveillance system in place and could adapt it,” he said.Training those who report diseases is also important, said Nora Wineland, DVM, MS, co-leader for the National Center for Animal Health Surveillance and Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Health, part of APHIS veterinary services.”The eyes and ears are the producers, the veterinarians, and our action at the federal level is to help with educating them on knowing what to look for and what to report,” Wineland said. Her office encourages states to bring their reportable disease lists in line with OIE’s.Public health efforts have gotten a boost from bioterrorism-related grants, sources said.”The terrorism dollars have done a great service to public health in terms of providing staffing and getting us to see things a little bit differently,” said the CDC’s Treadwell.Agencies need more funding for animal disease diagnostic labs and to strengthen the link between human health and animal health at the federal level, she added.Boosting animal disease surveillance was not high on Lee Myers’ priority list on Sep 17. Myers, DVM, the Georgia state veterinarian, was trying to figure out how to recover the surviving chickens from five poultry houses flooded by Hurricane Ivan’s storms.”You address an incident the same from our purposes whether it’s bioterror or not,” she said. “The different component is law enforcement, and it’s still not clear how we’ll work with them. What authorities do they have? How do we train them to prevent spreading disease?””In an ideal world, we would like to know the prevalence of a lot of [animal diseases], but it’s expensive,” Myers said. “A lot of focus has been on bioterrorism, but most states are charged with emergency management in any emergency . . . whether hurricane, biological agent, truck wreck, regardless.”Myers cited a variety of challenges to collaboration between the veterinary and public health realms: improving computer technology, speaking a common language, and understanding jurisdictions.Gail Hansen, DVM, MPH, president of the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, said veterinary–public health collaborations require a shift in thinking. “Public health traditionally has not worked with vets in private practice very much, except with rabies,” she said.Teamwork could mean faster identification of zoonotic disease outbreaks, because animal tests have outpaced their human counterparts, and also because a sick animal may be euthanized for testing, Hansen said.But identifying the best solutions will remain a local task, she added. “Every state needs to make decisions about how to shore up their public health.”last_img read more

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first_img 1/1 Read More Comment SPONSORED Rio Ferdinand tells Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop struggling 1 min. story Ceballos was forced off with injury against Vitoria (Picture: Getty)Ceballos will be a big miss against Leicester City, with many billing the contest as a crucial game in the fight for the Premier League top four.AdvertisementAdvertisementArsenal are six points behind third-placed Leicester and are without a win in their last three league games.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityThe match against Leicester City is Arsenal’s final game before a two-week international break.Arsenal resume club action on 23 November against Southampton, but it is unclear if Ceballos will be fit again after the international fixtures.The Gunners do not have any other injury concerns heading into the clash with Leicester City, although the under-fire Granit Xhaka is expected to be left out again.MORE: Arsenal’s Sokratis Papastathopoulos tells Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang captaincy doesn’t matterMORE: Charlie Nicholas slams shocking Matteo Guendouzi and tells Unai Emery to drop Arsenal star for Leicester clash Coral BarryFriday 8 Nov 2019 9:52 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.9kShares Read More Read More 00:02 / 00:30 Full Screen Read More Read More Coming Next Manchester United captain Harry Maguire Skip Ad About Connatix V67539 PLAY Ceballos will miss Arsenal’s next game (Picture: Getty)Dani Ceballos will miss Arsenal’s trip to Leicester City on Saturday with a hamstring injury, the club have confirmed.The midfielder asked to be taken off just five minutes into Arsenal’s Europa League game against Vitoria on Wednesday night, appearing to pick up a muscle injury.Arsenal issued an update on Ceballos’ injury ahead of their Premier League fixture this weekend, but are unsure when the Spaniard will return to action.‘[Dani Ceballos is] currently being assessed, but will miss Saturday’s match at Leicester City,’ a club statement said.ADVERTISEMENT Top articles Visit Advertiser website GO TO PAGE by Metro Arsenal star Dani Ceballos to miss Leicester City clash with hamstring injury Advertisement Advertisement Skip in 3s Video Settings Top articles: Chelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he rejected deadline day move to West Hamlast_img read more

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first_imgClearly Glass is seeing a growing trend of fancy glass wine cellars in Queensland homes. Photo: Supplied Norman Park couple Paul and Jenny Fraser built their home last year and designed a stunning cellar “from a display point of view”.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours agoMr Fraser said the 500-bottle cellar was a key feature of their home. “It’s floor-to-ceiling glass and an L-shaped wine cellar,” Mr Fraser said. “It’s one of the first things you see from the front door. It’s very unique.” 72 Botticelli St, Fig Tree Pocket.A new multimillion-dollar home at Fig Tree Pocket, by Tabrizi Home Builders, features a 400-bottle wine cellar.It is a “fabulous conversation-starter”, according to selling agent Cathy Lammie, of Cathy Lammie Property.Ms Lammie said the wine cellar was a major feature of the three-level home.At East Brisbane, a home with two wine cellars, one worth $100,000, sold for $4 million last year. The five-bedroom, seven-bathroom home was built by Zephyr Industries. Paul and Jenny Fraser at their Norman Park home with their wine cellar. Photo: Peter WallisGone are the days of storing wine in an underground cellar.Queenslanders love a good drop and are spending up to $100,000 on fancy cellars, displaying their finest bottles and making it a focal point of their households.Clearly Glass general manager Matt Sinn said the clever and modern display of wine bottles was gaining popularity, while improving accessibility.“Cellars are the new must-have,” Mr Sinn said. “The new trend is to have the wine cellar as part of the entertaining area of the home, or at the very least, an attractive storage facility.”Brisbane company Clearly Glass has installed wine cellars in several blue-chip suburbs, including Paddington, Norman Park, Ascot and Teneriffe.“The cellars can be temperature controlled and locked up and vary in size from holding a hundred bottles to thousands,” Mr Sinn said. “Costs vary from a few thousand dollars to tens of thousands, depending on the importance of the wine cellar in the scope of the overall design.” Another great design byClearly Glass. Photo: SuppliedMr Sinn said Clearly Glass specialised in frameless products and architectural glass installation.“The wine cellar is the latest room to get the frameless glass make over,” he said.“Frameless glass as a building product is very fashionable currently and it makes perfect sense for the wine cellar to get the frameless look.“The ability to showcase the bottles without any obstruction to the view makes frameless glass the obvious choice.”He said many builders and architects, such as CGH Constructions, Graya Constructions, M2 Construct and MKW, were using frameless cellars in their projects.last_img read more

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first_imgILOILO City – Be courteous when dealing with people at quarantine and border control points, the Police Regional Office 6 (PRO-6) reminded policemen. Pamuspusan encouraged people to report misbehaving policemen. He said the PRO-6 has a hotline – 09989673651. “They must also avoid taking photos of private documents during inspections. Strictly adhere to the PNP’s ethical standards and good conduct. Be dignified when discharging police functions everyday,” he added. “Supervisor and commanders will be directly liable for failure of supervision if their subordinates publicly misbehave and disrespect people,” he stressed. “Internal cleansing” of the PRO-6 is one of the thrusts of the police director. He made this clear on his first day   of office in Camp Delgado after formally assuming his post on June 27, 2019. “Philippine National Police (PNP) personnel must, at all times, be polite, most especially with elderly people and women,” said Police Brigadier General Rene Pamuspusan, regional police director. “So far wala pa naman may nag-report sa akin about the arrogant behavior of my personnel,” said Pamuspusan. Arrogant and disrespectful police officers would not be tolerated; there would be sanctions, said Pamuspusan. “I assure the men and women of PRO-6 that I will not demand from you those which I am not willing to do myself,” said Pamuspusan, the 34th director of the PRO-6./PNlast_img read more

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first_imgElda Jean “Boots” Atkins, 92, of Lawrenceburg, Indiana, passed away Tuesday November 27, 2018 in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.She was born August 29, 1926, daughter of the late George Meyer and Clara (Bode) Meyer.Boots worked as a cook for Central Elementary school, with over 20 years of service.She was a life member of St John Lutheran Church (Bellaire). Boots was active in the WELCA and the quilting group.Her passion was quilting, and she taught many others her craft. She has made over 75 quilts, all hand cut and hand sewn. She touched many lives with her crafts, from quilts to baby blankets. She also loved to crochet afghans and scarves. Boots was a great cook, she was famous for her potato salad, BBQ and homemade goetta. She loved time with her family and friends and she will be greatly missed.Boots is survived by her children, Cheryl (Myron) Cors of Lawrenceburg, IN, Danny (late Ruth Ann) Atkins of Lawrenceburg, IN, Linda Sechrest of Aurora, IN, Barbara Kaffenberger Scherzinger (late Michael) of Lawrenceburg, IN; grandchildren, Stephanie (Vernon) Johnson, Amy (Gordon) Barrett, Jason (Jill) Kaffenberger, Shelly (Ki) Yoon, Jennifer Atkins, Brian (Amy) Atkins, Brandon (Andrea Golden) Atkins, Travis Atkins (Jodie Peters) , Jamey (Tonia) Sechrest, Andrew Sechrest (Lisa Collins); 15 great grandchildren, and 2 great, great grandchildren.She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Herbert Melvin Atkins; brother, Harold Meyer, sister, Lavern Rosenbaum; great-grandchildren, Josie Yoon, and Jesse Barrett.Friends will be received Sunday, December 2, 2018, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm at the St. John Lutheran Church (Bellaire), 4937 State Road #48, Lawrenceburg, Indiana 47025.Services will be held at the Church at 3:00 pm with Pastor Mathew Voyer STS officiating.Interment will follow in the St. John’s Lutheran Cemetery (Bellaire), Lawrenceburg, Indiana.Contributions may be made to the St. John Lutheran Church. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

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